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Academics - Political Science Faculty & Staff

Academics - Political Science Faculty & Staff

Lorraine McCrary

BKT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
Picture of McCrary, Lorraine
CONTACT:
Baxter Hall 129
765-361-6117
mccraryl@wabash.edu

Lorraine Krall McCrary is a political theorist whose research brings together disability studies and the feminist ethic of care; she also writes about Arendtian natality, as well as the relationship between the family and politics. She often draws on literature in her research.

Before coming to Wabash, McCrary taught at Washington University in St. Louis and Villanova University.

Born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, the home of Little League baseball, she lives with her husband, Lewis, and their young sons in Crawfordsville.

EDUCATION

Ph.D. Georgetown University
M.A. Georgetown University
B.A. Grove City College

RECENT COURSE OFFERINGS

Introduction to Political Theory
Disability and Politics
The Family, Gender and Politics
Tocqueville and the Idea of Fraternity in America
Citizenship and Dystopia
American Political Thought
The Social Contract
Justice, Virtue, and Duty

RECENT PRESENTATIONS

“Politics in Community: L’Arche and Agency in People with Intellectual Disabilities”; American Political Science Association Conference; Washington, DC: August 30, 2019.

“The Pariah, Disability, and Identity Politics: A Position of Critique”; American Political Science Association Conference; Boston, MA: September 1, 2018.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

“From Hull-House to Herland: Engaged and Extended Care in Jane Addams and Charlotte Perkins Gilman.” Politics & Gender 15 (2019): 62-82.

“Natality and Cognitive Disability: From Augustine to Arendt and Back.” Arendt Studies Vol. 2 (August 2018): 75-98.

“Re-envisioning Independence and Community: Critiques from the Independent Living Movement and L'Arche.” Journal of Social Philosophy 48, no. 3 (September 2017): 377-393.

“Geel’s Family Care Tradition: Toward the Social Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities.” Disability and Human Rights Special Issue of the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies 11, no. 3 (August 2017): 285-301.