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23/SP Course Faculty Days Comments/Requisites Credits Course Type Location
ACC - ACCOUNTING
ACC-202-01
Management Accounting
Hensley E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
ACC-201
1.00
BAX 202
ACC-202-02
Management Accounting
Foos J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
ACC-201
1.00
BAX 214
ART - ART
ART-104-01
Roman Art & Archaeology
Hartnett J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ART-104-01=CLA-104-01
1.00 LFA
HAY 104
ART-125-01
Drawing
Mohl D
M W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00 LFA
FIN A133
ART-210-01
Contemporary African Am Art
Mahady A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ART-210-01=BLS-270-04 African American Contemporary art synthesizes approaches from art history, Black Studies and visual culture studies to investigate race and representation in the United States since 1919. In this course we will discuss historical art movements such as the Red Summer, the Harlem Renaissance, Social Realism, Abstraction, Magical Realism, and Afrofuturism. We will utilize digital humanities investigation techniques such as mapping and network theory to explore how African American artists addressed ideas about race and belonging through works of art, and through the ties they forged within artist communities, collectives, and social movements.

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1.00 LFA
CEN 305
ART-210-02
Gender, Art and Media
Mahady A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
This course takes an intersectional approach to the study of art through movies and video games. Rather than viewing works of art as discrete objects on display in a gallery, we will explore the ways that films, video games, painting, drawing and sculpture shape societal and individual ideas about gender. We will analyze how fine art informs popular media such as John Wick, The Harder They Fall, Birds of Prey, and the Assassin's Creed franchise, and what these media communicate about representations of gender identity and performance.

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1.00 LFA
FIN M120
ART-219-01
Auteur Cinema
Mohl D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Mystery and atmosphere, abstract logic and absurdity, psychological surrealism, and genre stylization are just a few of the topics we will examine in this course on contemporary auteur filmmakers. Auteur theory connects a director to a film in the same way an author is connected to a book; as the primary creative force that distinctly links a myriad of decisions and ideas into a unified vision. A film can be much more than a spectacle that momentarily entertains, it can serve as a window into the mind of a director and allow an audience to view the world in imaginative, challenging, and unexpected new ways. Through screenings and discussions, we will analyze unique stylistic tonalities, thematic preoccupations, and philosophical perspectives that define auteur films and the directors who create them. In doing so, students will develop a deeper appreciation and understanding of the medium and its limitless possibilities.

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1.00 LFA
FIN M120
ART-225-01
Experimental Filmmaking
Mohl D
TU TH
08:00AM - 10:50AM
This course re-evaluates the tropes and mainstream conventions of narrative filmmaking and focuses on the methodologies of the artist/filmmaker who uses the medium as a personal form of expression. It examines alternative modes of cinematic production, revolving around the Avant-guard, underground, abstract, poetic, transcendental, and visionary. Students will learn basic camera operation, editing software, audio field recording, and sound design. They will have the opportunity to explore their ideas through project prompts, with parameters designed to develop specific skill sets and aesthetic sensibilities. Depending on the semester, projects may include: remixing current/archival images and footage, time and repetition experiments, compositing/2D collage, nonlinear narratives, and site-specific projection. No previous camera or editing experience is required.

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1.00 LFA
FIN A133
ART-225-02
Art and Social Practice
Strader A, Corona-Aguilera J
TU TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
The field of Social Practice blurs the line between life and art, emphasizing creative work that connects to current social and cultural issues. Students will develop projects in response to social and cultural issues that are relevant to them, once areas of interest are identified they will research various strategies for expression to create socially engaged art projects. The course pays particular attention to underrepresented artists to better understand the ways in which social practice artists use evocative and agitational strategies to subvert oppressive systems. Among other topics we will consider issues of place, identity, immigration, climate, the role of the global majority in the social fabric, the nature of public space, and using art as a conduit for creative transformation in our contemporary life.

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1.00 LFA
FIN A124
ART-225-03
Advanced Photography
Weedman M
M W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
This course dives further into photoshop, in compositing, portrait enhancement, along with layout strategies and methods. Photography advancements will explore stroboscopic, macro and experimental methods along with advanced lighting techniques. Pre-requisites for the course are Art - 224 Photography or intermediate experience with photoshop and mastery of basic manual exposure DSLR techniques.

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1.00 LFA
FIN A113
ART-331-01
Advanced Studio
Strader A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Two credits from ART-125,
ART-126,
ART-223,
ART-224, ART-225,
ART-227,
and ART-228. At least one credit must be from the 200 level.
This course is open to junior or seniors or Instructor permission.
1.00
FIN A119
ART-433-01
Senior Studio
Weedman M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ART-330 or ART-331
1.00
FIN A113
ASI - ASIAN STUDIES
ASI-112-01
Japanese Manga and Anime
Whitney J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
ASI-112-01=ENG-180-01 From Akira Toriyama's Dragon Ball to Sui Ishida's Tokyo Ghoul, Japanese manga and anime have earned a reputation for being globally influential genres of literature and entertainment. Japanese manga artists often use their manga to interrogate complex themes of humanity, technology, gender, race, existential beliefs, and culture. Likewise, Japanese anime uses cinematic visual storytelling to raise questions about adolescence, identity, and personal growth. This course will delve into a variety of Japanese anime and manga genres in order to discover how these mediums function as literature. Assigned reading material includes Naoko Takeuchi's Sailor Moon, Akira Toriyama's Dragon Ball, Sui Ishida's Tokyo Ghoul, Hiromu Arakawa's Fullmetal Alchemist, and other works. We will also engage several anime adaptations, such as Noriyuki Abe's Yu Yu Hakusho: Ghost Files, Mitsuru Hongo's Outlaw Star, Shinichiro Watanabe's Cowboy Bebop and Daisuke Nishio's Dragon Ball Z. Major assignments will include quizzes, short literary analysis papers, an in-class oral presentation, a midterm exam, and a comprehensive final exam on the material.

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1.00 LFA
HAY 319
ASI-112-02
Chinese Science Fiction
Healey C
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
ASI-112-02=ENG-180-02 Over the past decade, Chinese science fiction in translation has garnered attention worldwide, winning international awards and bringing Chinese literature to a wider audience than ever before. The genre is often seen as a way of representing China's breakneck economic and technological development in a political environment where censorship is the norm. This course will consider the development of Chinese science fiction from the early twentieth century to the present. Stories will touch on themes ranging from cyborgs to alien invasion to environmental catastrophe. We will consider Chinese science fiction's unique contributions to both Chinese literary tradition and global science fiction. All readings will be in English.

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1.00 LFA
DET 111
ASI-260-01
Modern China
Healey C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
ASI-260-01=HIS-262-01 An introduction to modern Chinese history and cultural traditions from the late 1800s to the present, outlining themes such as nation-building, socialism, social movements, economic development, memory, gender, international relations, and the relationship between art and politics. The class will analyze a variety of primary sources (in translation), such as speeches, editorials, memoirs, fiction, film, documentary, photography, visual art, and popular music. All readings in English.

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1.00 HPR
DET 111
ASI-260-02
World Hist Since 1500
Royalty B
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
ASI-260-02=HIS-102-02
1.00
BAX 101
ASI-260-03
World Hist Since 1500
Morillo S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
BAX 202
ASI-277-01
The Economics of Asia
Saha S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prerequisite: ECO-101
ASI-277-01=ECO-277-01 This is an introductory course on the economic development in East and Southeast Asian Countries. The course explores the elements of emerging markets with a focus on the impact of capital flows, globalization, economic and financial development, social and economic inequality, social system, and poverty. Several Asian economies experienced speedy economic growth in the last sixty to seventy years. After World War II, Japan was the first high-growth economy in Asia. It was quickly followed by a set of very diverse countries, for example, China, India, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore, and Vietnam. China and India had sudden emergence onto the world stage as active traders, investors, and consumers. Common characteristics of these countries' growth success are macroeconomic stability, relatively less inequality and investment in people, export promotion, etc. This course focuses on the economic characteristics and socio-economic development of these Asian economies to examine similarities and differences among them, how the Asian regions grew from an agricultural area into a newly developed area, and how the institutional environment supported the economic growth. Finally, it is worth noting that growth has also levied a toll on these countries' environment and has led to the rapid degradation of their natural resources. The goal of this course is to explore the key components and features of the rapidly growing/grown East and Southeast Asian economies and to analyze the development strategies and socio-economic conditions of the individual countries.

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1.00
BAX 214
BIO - BIOLOGY
BIO-101-01
Human Biology
Bost A, Sorensen-Kamakian E, Wetzel E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00 SL
HAY 104
BIO-101L-01
Human Biology Lab
Bost A
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-101
0.00
HAY 110
BIO-101L-02
Human Biology Lab
Wetzel E
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-101
0.00
HAY 110
BIO-101L-03
Human Biology Lab
Bost A
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-101
0.00
HAY 110
BIO-101L-04
Human Biology Lab
Sorensen-Kamakian E
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-101
0.00
HAY 110
BIO-103-01
Environmental Science
Carlson B
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
BIO-103-01=GHL-103-01
1.00 SL
DET 209
BIO-103L-01
Environmental Science Lab
Carlson B
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Concurrent registration required in BIO-103
0.00
HAY 103
BIO-103L-02
Environmental Science Lab
Carlson B
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Concurrent registration required in BIO-103
0.00
HAY 103
BIO-112-01
General Biology II
Burton P, Ingram A
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prerequisite: BIO-111.
1.00 SL
HAY 104
BIO-112L-01
General Biol II Lab
Ingram A
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
BIO-112
0.00
HAY 111
BIO-112L-02
General Biol II Lab
Ingram A
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
BIO-112
0.00
HAY 111
BIO-112L-03
General Biol II Lab
Burton P
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
BIO-112
0.00
HAY 111
BIO-112L-04
General Biol II Lab
Burton P
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
BIO-112
0.00
HAY 111
BIO-212-01
Cell Biology
Walsh H
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prerequisite: BIO-211 or BIO-213
1.00 QL, SL
HAY 003
BIO-212L-01
Cell Biology Lab
Walsh H
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-requisite: BIO-212
0.00
HAY 214
BIO-212L-02
Cell Biology Lab
Walsh H
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-requisite: BIO-212
0.00
HAY 214
BIO-311-01
Molecular Genetics
Sorensen-Kamakian E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
BIO-211
1.00
HAY 001
BIO-311L-01
Molecular Genetics Lab
Sorensen-Kamakian E
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co Req BIO-311
0.00
HAY 212
BIO-322-01
Biology of Invertebrates
Wetzel E
M W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Prerequiste: BIO-112
Lecture and Lab are integrated
1.00
HAY 101
BIO-371-01
Molecular Endocrinology
Walsh H
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
BIO-212
BIO-371-01=NSC-310-01 Hormones, the chemical signals of the endocrine system, rely on receptors and signal transduction pathways to carry out their powerful physiological, neural, and behavioral effects. This course will examine the molecular and cellular mechanisms of hormone action through primary scientific literature analysis and extensive writing. Students will learn to integrate concepts from molecular biology, cell biology, neuroscience, physiology, and pharmacology while emphasizing the contributions basic endocrine research to human health. This course counts as an elective for the Biology and Biochemistry majors and the Neuroscience minor.

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1.00
HAY 001
BLS - BLACK STUDIES
BLS-201-01
Introduction to Black Studies
Lake T
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
BLS-201-01=ENG-260-01
1.00
CEN 305
BLS-270-01
French Colonial Hist. & Media
Altergott R
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FRE-277-01=HIS-230-02=BLS-270-01 Who gets to write History? This seminar will approach French colonial history through the lens of the "archive" as a site of knowledge and power. What alternative modes of knowledge production and preservation have risen to challenge dominant historical narratives across the Francophone world? How do the formal aspects and possibilities of a medium change how memories get transmitted? Drawing from historical sources, novels, and multimedia objects-from podcasts to photographs, graphic novels, and video games-we will learn to critique imperial modes of representation and elaborate a new definition of "the archival" through orality, repertoire, testimony, historical fiction, and other Francophone cultural productions. This course will be taught in English, and we will use English translations of French texts. Those taking the course for credit towards the French major or minor will be expected to do the readings and written assignments in French. This course is cross-listed with History and Black Studies. It also satisfies requirements for the Film and Digital Media minor, as well as the diversity requirement for PPE majors.

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1.00 HPR, LFA
DET 128
BLS-270-02
Law & Literature
Whitney J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
ENG-270-01=BLS-270-02 What does reading literature teach us about the connections between race and law? How can legal and literary texts be read to understand issues of race and justice? In this class, we will discuss how literature (both fiction and non-fiction) examines the way the law negotiates and reinforces systems of race, bias and racism. We will think about the ways in which different literary works depict the law and encourage us to be skilled interpreters/critics of the law. Assigned reading material will include Bryan Stevenson's Just Mercy, Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, and legal writings from a number of legal scholars such as Michelle Alexander and Cheryl Harris. Major assignments will include quizzes, short literary analysis essays, an in-class oral presentation, and a final exam. Students interested in either attending law school or doing any public policy work are highly encouraged to take the course.

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1.00 LFA
CEN 304
BLS-270-03
Black Dance
Lake T
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
What is the connection between spiritual dance and twerking? They are both dances inspired by African rhythmic and aesthetic movements. African and African Diasporic dance traditions are deployed for a range of ritual and cultural expressions. Spiritual movements in worship are meant to free the body from the mundane world bracketed by time and space while stylized movements in the club and on music videos are evocative of a worldly freedom. What is the source of these movements and gestures? How are we to make sense of the various religious and social articulation of Black bodies in the past and today? This course will explore Black dance across history and geography and at the intersections of race, class, gender and our modern hyper-media economy. Students will be able to trace the history of Black people through dance and critically engage dance for its social, political and economic valences.

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1.00
CEN 215
BLS-270-04
Contemporary African Am Art
Mahady A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ART-201-01=BLS-270-04 African American Contemporary art synthesizes approaches from art history, Black Studies and visual culture studies to investigate race and representation in the United States since 1919. In this course we will discuss historical art movements such as the Red Summer, the Harlem Renaissance, Social Realism, Abstraction, Magical Realism, and Afrofuturism. We will utilize digital humanities investigation techniques such as mapping and network theory to explore how African American artists addressed ideas about race and belonging through works of art, and through the ties they forged within artist communities, collectives, and social movements.

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1.00 LFA
CEN 305
BLS-280-01
Malcolm and Mandela
Thomas S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HIS-240-02=BLS-280-01 This course considers the overlapping lives and legacies of Malcolm X and Nelson Mandela, two revolutionary figures whose influence on the fight for civil rights in America and Africa was profound and far reaching. Though the American public rarely imagined them as political bedfellows in their time, their lives had striking autobiographical similarities and pan-African connections. Students will examine the convergences and confluences of their biographies, political ideologies, and activism while exploring broader issues including colonialism, civil disobedience, cultural resistance, social justice, and freedom. We will consider how their lives intersected in the transnational struggle for racial equality and how their legacies continue to shape contemporary debates about black identity and the continued crisis of American race relations. Notably, students will also connect the lives of both men to Black experience at Wabash College and the Crawfordsville community since the 1950s.

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1.00
MXI 214
BLS-280-02
Black Germany
Thomas S, Tucker B
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HIS-230-01=GER-312-01=BLS-280-02 Despite its widespread image as a white, racially homogenous country, Germany is home to a vibrant and growing Black community with a long and complicated history. Students in this course will explore the history of Black Germany beginning with the 19th century colonial encounters between Germany and the African diaspora and the emergence of a German born Black population. The course will consider questions of nationality, citizenship, race, and identity, such as "What does it means to be German?" and "What does it mean to be Black?" from transnational and transracial perspectives.

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1.00 LFA
MXI 214
BLS-280-03
Educational Policy & Eval
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
EDU-240-01=BLS-280-03
1.00
MXI 109
BLS-280-04
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
EDU-201-01=BLS-280-04
1.00
MXI 109
BLS-280-05
Protest & Policy in the Us
Gelbman S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PSC-210-01=PPE-238-01=BLS-280-05 This course examines the role of protest as a means of political expression that has been used by a variety of political actors seeking to change the policies and political practices of the United States throughout its history. The focus will be on two overarching questions: Why has protest been such a fixture of American politics? And to what extent does it actually influence public policy outcomes? In addition to considering frameworks for making sense of the role of protest in the development of US public policy in general, we'll take a close look at the experiences of three specific protest movements: the mid-twentieth-century Civil Rights Movement; the Tea Party, and the contemporary Environmental Justice Movement. Students will also have the opportunity to research the policy impact of a US-based protest initiative of their choosing.

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1.00
BAX 201
BLS-280-06
Africa Since 1885
Warner R
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
HIS-272-01=BLS-280-06=HIS-370-01
1.00
MXI 109
BLS-300-01
Anti-Racist Christian Theology
Nelson D
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
REL-373-01=BLS-300-01 "Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Sometimes we must interfere." -- Elie Wiesel, Holocaust survivor. The world is finally understanding that there can be no teaching about race that is not also teaching against racism. This course will compare the Black experience in the United States, and theological reflection thereon, with Black experience under the brutal Apartheid regime in South Africa. We begin by examining first-person narratives from Black and White Americans on the harms done by racism. We will do the same with Black (Bantu), White and the so-called "Cape-Coloured" South Africans. Then we will look at histories told about how the parallel systems of oppression were conceived, installed and how they functioned. The last half of the class explores arguments made by James Cone on how the cross of Jesus Christ looks like (and unlike) a lynching tree; by South African Allan Boesak on the dangerous but tantalizing specter of "hope"; and by the womanist theologian Kelly Brown Douglas on theology in the wake of the killing of teenager Trayvon Martin.

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1.00
CEN 300
BLS-300-02
Diversity & Multicultural Ed
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:15PM - 03:25PM
EDU-303-01=BLS-300-02
1.00
DET 112
BLS-300-03
Southern Gothic Literature
Benedicks C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
ENG-310-01=GEN-300-01=BLS-300-03 This class is about the ghosts that haunt the literature of the American South. After the Civil War, when the ideal of the pastoral plantation crumbled, Southern writers sought to contend with the brutal historic realities that had always lurked behind the white-pillared façade: poverty, violence, slavery, racism, patriarchy. Southern Gothic literature-which emerged in the early 19th century and continues strong today-is marked by dark humor, transgressive desires, grotesque violence, folk spiritualism, hereditary sins, emotional and environmental isolation, supernatural forces, and punishing madness. In this class, we will listen to the stories that the ghosts of the American South have told, and still tell today.

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1.00 LFA
CEN 215
CHE - CHEMISTRY
CHE-101-01
Survey of Chemistry
Wysocki L
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00 QL, SL
HAY 319
CHE-101L-01
Survey Chemistry Lab
Kalb A
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
0.00
HAY 316
CHE-101L-02
Survey Chemistry Lab
Kalb A
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
0.00
HAY 316
CHE-241-01
Inorganic Chemistry
Porter L, Scanlon J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: CHE-111.
1.00 QL, SL
HAY 104
CHE-241L-01
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Porter L
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
0.00
HAY 315
CHE-241L-02
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Scanlon J
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
0.00
HAY 315
CHE-241L-03
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Scanlon J
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
0.00
HAY 315
CHE-321-01
Organic Chemistry II
Wysocki L
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: CHE-221
1.00
HAY 319
CHE-321L-01
Organic Chem II Lab
Wysocki L
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Corequisite: CHE-321
0.00
HAY 314
CHE-321L-02
Organic Chem II Lab
Wysocki L
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Corequisite: CHE-321
0.00
HAY 314
CHE-331-01
Analytical Chemistry
Kalb A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
CHE-241 (must be completed prior to taking this course)
1.00
HAY 002
CHE-331L-01
Analytical Chemistry Lab
Kalb A
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Corequisite: CHE-331
0.00
HAY 002
CHE-361-01
Biochemistry
Taylor A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisite: CHE-211,
CHE-241,
or CHE-321,
or permission of instructor
1.00 QL, SL
HAY 319
CHE-361L-01
Biochemistry Lab
Taylor A
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-361
0.00
HAY 211
CHE-361L-02
Biochemistry Lab
Taylor A
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-361
0.00
HAY 211
CHE-451-01
Advanced Physical Chemistry
Scanlon J
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CHE-351 (must be completed prior to taking this course)
1st half semester course
0.50
HAY 003
CHE-471-01
Computational Chemistry
Scanlon J
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CHE-241 (must be completed prior to taking this course)
2nd half semester course This course is designed as an introduction to the many applications of computational chemistry. The background theory of methods will be discussed briefly so that the proper method for each chemical topic can be chosen. The focus of the course will be to showcase how to use computational chemistry to solve chemical problems. Students will run calculations to answer chemical questions.

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0.50
HAY 003
CHI - CHINESE
CHI-102-01
Elementary Chinese II
Li Y
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
CHI-101,
or CHI-102 placement
1.00 WL
DET 111
CHI-102L-01
Elementary Chinese II Lab
Y. Chou
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
0.00
DET 211
CHI-102L-02
Elementary Chinese II Lab
Y. Chou
TU
03:10PM - 04:00PM
0.00
DET 212
CHI-102L-03
Elementary Chinese II Lab
Y. Chou
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
0.00
DET 212
CHI-202-01
Intermediate Chinese II
Healey C
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CHI-201,
or CHI-202 placement
1.00 WL
DET 220
CHI-202L-01
Intermediate Chinese II Lab
Y. Chou
TH
03:10PM - 04:00PM
0.00
DET 212
CHI-311-01
Studies in Chinese Language
Li Y
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisite: CHI-301,
or CHI-311 placement
1.00 WL
DET 220
CLA - CLASSICS
CLA-101-01
Classical Mythology
Barnes R
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
CLA-101-01=GEN-171-01
1.00 LFA
DET 209
CLA-104-01
Roman Art & Archaeology
Hartnett J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
CLA-104-01=ART-104-01
1.00 LFA
HAY 104
CLA-162-01
New Testament
Reed Jay J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
CLA-162-01=REL-162-01
1.00 HPR, LFA
CEN 216
CLA-212-01
Uncovering Greek Religion
Wickkiser B
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
CLA-212-01=REL-290-03 The Greeks were a polytheistic society: they worshipped numerous gods. Moreover, they did so in a variety of modes and for a multitude of reasons. Using ancient literature and archaeological remains, we will consider the nature and function of the gods of the Greek pantheon, as well as the sacred spaces, festivals, dedications, and rituals through which the Greeks worshipped their deities from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period and the rise of Christianity. As we explore these topics, we will situate religion within the changing social and historical contexts of the ancient world. This entails analysis of the relation between cults and the state, especially Athenian democracy; the impact of deities and festivals on warfare, the economy, athletics, and literature; and the role of refugees, slaves, women, and other marginalized groups. The course is discussion oriented; most class periods will be spent in conversation about assigned readings. An intensive immersion component rounds out the course: we will travel to Greece from May 7-17, 2023.

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1.00 HPR, LFA
HAY 321
CLA-213-01
Greek and Roman Science
Gorey M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
CLA-213-01=HIS-210-01 Archimedes, the famous Sicilian-Greek mathematician and inventor, is said to have founded the discipline of fluid dynamics in a moment of inspiration while taking a bath. But beyond the confines of Archimedes' bathtub, the evolution of what we now think of as "science" was often a freewheeling and haphazard affair, with many fascinating detours and dead ends along the way. This course will investigate ancient Greek and Roman innovations in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math, along with their varied connections to the modern world. We will study the earliest attempts to understand, quantify, and control the natural world of the ancient Mediterranean, tracing the origins and growth of modern "STEM" fields from Ancient Egypt and Babylonia to Classical Greece and Imperial Rome.

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1.00 HPR, LFA
DET 112
CLA-400-01
Senior Seminar
Wickkiser B
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00 LFA
TBA TBA
COL - COLLOQUIUM
COL-402-01
Important Books
Blix D, Howland F
W
07:30PM - 09:00PM
1.00 LFA
CEN 304
CSC - COMPUTER SCIENCE
CSC-101-01
Intro to Computer Science
McKinney C
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00 QL
HAY 003
CSC-111-01
Intro to Programming
McKinney C
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prerequisite: CSC-101,
CSC-106,
or MAT-112; or permission of the instructor.
1.00 QL
HAY 003
CSC-211-01
Intro to Data Structures
Westphal C
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: CSC-111 with a minimum grade of C-.
1.00
GOO 101
CSC-243-01
Algorithm Design and Analysis
Ansaldi K
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
MAT-111,
CSC-211,
and MAT-108 or MAT-219
1.00
GOO 104
CSC-271-01
Image Processing
Borjigin S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisite: CSC-111 and MAT-223
CSC-271-01=MAT-277-01 This course provides an introduction to basic concepts and techniques in digital image processing. Topics may include intensity transformations, spatial filtering, filtering in the frequency domain, image restoration and reconstruction, color image processing, wavelets and multiresolution processing, image compression, and image segmentation.

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1.00
HAY 003
CSC-371-01
Retrocomputing: 8-BIT/6502 Era
McKinney C
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Minimum grade of C- in CSC-241
In 1977, The "Trinity" of mass-produced microcomputers hit the market: the TRS-80, the Apple II, and the Commodore PET. The latter two computers, like the Apple I before them, were powered by the venerable MOS 6502 processor. The 6502 though was not enough; building a computer around it required an array of auxiliary support processors. Thus, each computer of the era had different capabilities for sound, graphics, and storage; each had a different array of peripheral devices designed to work with them. Even today, millions of 6502 processors are manufactured; they are used in everything from industrial systems to the Tamagotchi toy. Fictional characters even use them, including Bender from Futurama and the T-800 series from Terminator. This intensely project-based class will focus on the 6502 processor and family of supporting auxiliary processors. We'll look at how the family was used in popular systems of the time, such as the Commodore 64 and the Famicom/Nintendo Entertainment System. We'll program in a variety of languages, including BASIC, Pascal, Forth, C, and TONS OF ASSEMBLY, using both modern emulators and real hardware. We'll look at how graphics and sound work, how data is stored, and how the user was able to interact with the system. We'll look at how the limitations of the 6502 and auxiliary processors fostered creative programming and clever thinking. Finally, we'll look at the legacy of the 6502 and its 16-bit descendent, the 65816.

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1.00
HAY 003
DV1 - DIVISION I
DV1-178-01
Forensic Chemistry
Porter L
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
The continued popularity of crime scene analysis dramas and literary whodunits reflect society's fascination with criminal investigation. This introductory survey course in chemistry will focus on the theme of forensic science. Designed for non-science concentrators, this class explores the historical and philosophical developments in chemistry, as well as applications of chemical principles to criminalistics in the laboratory setting. Topics include the development of the atomic theory of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, the chemistry of life (organic and biochemistry), and forensic analysis. In addition, the course will explore the role of forensics in law enforcement, data ethics, bias, and issues relating to equity and social justice. Some elementary mathematics and simple statistics will be required for problem solving in class and lab. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Partially fulfills the College laboratory science requirement but cannot be combined with CHE101 or CHE 111 to complete the laboratory science requirement. This course does not satisfy requirements for the chemistry major or minor.

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1.00 QL, SL
HAY 319
DV1-178L-01
Forensic Chemistry Lab
Porter L
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-requisite: DV1-178
0.00
HAY 316
DV3 - DIVISION III
DV3-252-01
Stats Soc Sciences
Howland F
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1st half semester course
0.50 QL
BAX 214
ECO - ECONOMICS
ECO-101-01
Principles of Economics
Saha S
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00 BSC
BAX 214
ECO-101-02
Principles of Economics
Dunaway E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00 BSC
BAX 202
ECO-101-03
Principles of Economics
Snow N
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00 BSC
BAX 114
ECO-224-01
Econom & Political Development
Burnette J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Prerequisite: ECO-101
ECO-224-01=PPE-264-01=GHL-224-01
1.00 BSC
BAX 201
ECO-231-01
Law & Economics
Snow N
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: ECO-101
ECO-231-01=PPE-251-01
1.00 BSC
BAX 311
ECO-241-01
Game Theory
Dunaway E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00 BSC, QL
BAX 202
ECO-251-01
Economic Approach With Excel
Howland F
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: ECO-101
2nd half semester course
0.50 BSC, QL
BAX 214
ECO-253-01
Intro to Econometrics
Dunaway E
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisites: ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C-,
MAT-110 or MAT-111 with a minimum grade of C-,
One of the following courses or combinations with minimum grade(s) of C-: DV3-252,
or PSC-300,
or MAT-253 and MAT-353, or PSY-201 and PSY-202
1.00 BSC, QL
HAY 003
ECO-262-01
Financial Markets & Inst
Saha S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Pre-requisite: ECO-101
1.00 BSC
BAX 214
ECO-277-01
The Economics of Asia
Saha S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prerequisite: ECO-101
ECO-277-01=ASI-277-01 This is an introductory course on the economic development in East and Southeast Asian Countries. The course explores the elements of emerging markets with a focus on the impact of capital flows, globalization, economic and financial development, social and economic inequality, social system, and poverty. Several Asian economies experienced speedy economic growth in the last sixty to seventy years. After World War II, Japan was the first high-growth economy in Asia. It was quickly followed by a set of very diverse countries, for example, China, India, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore, and Vietnam. China and India had sudden emergence onto the world stage as active traders, investors, and consumers. Common characteristics of these countries' growth success are macroeconomic stability, relatively less inequality and investment in people, export promotion, etc. This course focuses on the economic characteristics and socio-economic development of these Asian economies to examine similarities and differences among them, how the Asian regions grew from an agricultural area into a newly developed area, and how the institutional environment supported the economic growth. Finally, it is worth noting that growth has also levied a toll on these countries' environment and has led to the rapid degradation of their natural resources. The goal of this course is to explore the key components and features of the rapidly growing/grown East and Southeast Asian economies and to analyze the development strategies and socio-economic conditions of the individual countries.

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1.00 BSC
BAX 214
ECO-291-01
Intermediate Micro Theory
Burnette J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisites: ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C-,
and MAT-110,
MAT-111,
MAT-112 or MAT-223 with a minimum grade of C-.
1.00 BSC
BAX 201
ECO-292-01
Intermediate Macro
Mikek P
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisites: ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C-,
and MAT-110 or 111 with a minimum grade of C-.
1.00 BSC
BAX 202
ECO-322-01
International Finance
Mikek P
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
ECO-253 and ECO-292
1.00 BSC
BAX 202
ECO-358-01
Crime and Punishment
D'Amico D
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisites: ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C- and one 200 level ECO course with a minimum grade of D,
OR with the consent of the instructor
ECO-358-01=PPE-358-01 This class will investigate the social phenomena of crime and punishment through the analytical tool kit of political economy. Students will learn a variety of theoretical approaches and apply them to understand and explain historic and contemporary trends of crime and punishment. Theoretical approaches will include rational and strategic decision making, public goods theory, bureaucratic incentives, comparative institutional analysis, and industrial organization. Key applied topics covered during the semester will include criminal behavior, the historic origins of criminal law and law enforcement services, the potentials and limits of both public and private provisions of policing and punishment, and the historic and contemporary patterns of crime and punitive trends across social contexts. Finally, students will assess the viability of historic and current criminal justice reform movements.

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1.00 BSC
BAX 201
ECO-361-01
Corporate Finance
Howland F
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Prerequisites: ECO-251,
ECO-253,
and ECO-291
1.00 BSC
BAX 312
EDU - EDUCATION
EDU-101-01
Intro Child & Adolescent Devel
Pittard M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00 BSC
DET 209
EDU-201-01
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequisite: ENG-101 or established proficiency
EDU-201-01=BLS-280-04
1.00 HPR
MXI 109
EDU-230-01
Teaching Jazz Improvisation
Williams S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
EDU-230-01=MUS-204-01 This course will focus on learning how to improvise with the Blues, and then teaching that improvisational skill to K - 12 school-age students in their native educational environment. Students will spend the first six weeks of the course on the Wabash campus learning, first, how to improvise with the blues and, second, how to teach this skill to younger students. Wabash students will be divided up into groups of 2 - 3 who will then be placed in a classroom corresponding with their age-level interests. The second half of the course will then be spent in an area K - 12 music classroom, teaching school-age students these improvisational skills. Wabash students will receive specific pedagogical methods appropriate for the age group in which they will be working, and the instructor will be able to observe their in-classroom teaching several times throughout the second half of the semester. While the ability to read music is not a requirement for this class, the willingness to sing for others (for teaching and demonstration) is a necessity.

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1.00 LFA
FIN CONC
EDU-235-01
Studies in Rural Education
Pittard M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1st half semester course.
0.50
DET 111
EDU-240-01
Educational Policy & Eval
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Prerequisite: FRT-101 Freshman Tutorial
EDU-240-01=BLS-280-03
1.00 QL
MXI 109
EDU-303-01
Diversity & Multicultural Ed
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:15PM - 03:25PM
Prerequisite: FRT-101 (required),
EDU-201 (recommended)
EDU-303-01=BLS-300-02
1.00 BSC
DET 112
EDU-330-01
Studies in Urban Education
Pittard M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
2nd half semester course.
0.50
DET 111
ENG - ENGLISH
ENG-109-01
Genocide & Refugees
Brewer A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
The course will explore representations of genocide and exile in Polish, Senegalese, South African, and Irish literatures and film. We will discuss the rise of fascism in Europe, the pre-WW II anti-Semitic rhetoric in the media, and the atrocities of the Holocaust itself from an interdisciplinary point of view, combining history, political science, and literature.

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1.00
CEN 300
ENG-109-02
Dante's Divine Comedy
Lamberton J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Travel with Dante through hell, purgatory, and the celestial sphere-and also deep into the world of Medieval Italy. Dante Alighieri's Divina Commedia (in English, The Divine Comedy), is an epic poem written by a man in crisis. Depressed and driven from his homeland, Dante dedicated a decade of his life to this work, seeking to find meaning in heartbreak, exile, and tragic loss. What is the narrator looking for? Himself. His first love. Home. Revenge. Salvation. God. Each of these answers is correct, yet none is sufficient. Along the way, the poem is unsparing, as it exposes the corruption of politicians, popes, priests, and commoners alike. On this literary journey, we will read about the people, places, beliefs, and questions that moved the spiritual seekers of the Middle Ages, and line them up against the questions that plague our own age. Past students in this course have been surprised and pleased by how Dante's search for moral and ethical clarity-and his boldness in speaking truth to power-has inspired them on their own journeys.

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1.00
CEN 300
ENG-121-01
Language Variation & Change
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prerequisite: ENG-122 or HUM-122 or MLL-122
MLL-121-01=HUM-121-01=ENG-121-01 2nd half semester course
0.50 LS
DET 209
ENG-122-01
Modern Linguistics
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MLL-122-01=HUM-122-02=ENG-122-01 1st half semester course
0.50 LS
DET 209
ENG-180-01
Japanese Manga and Anime
Whitney J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
ENG-180-01=ASI-112-01 From Akira Toriyama's Dragon Ball to Sui Ishida's Tokyo Ghoul, Japanese manga and anime have earned a reputation for being globally influential genres of literature and entertainment. Japanese manga artists often use their manga to interrogate complex themes of humanity, technology, gender, race, existential beliefs, and culture. Likewise, Japanese anime uses cinematic visual storytelling to raise questions about adolescence, identity, and personal growth. This course will delve into a variety of Japanese anime and manga genres in order to discover how these mediums function as literature. Assigned reading material includes Naoko Takeuchi's Sailor Moon, Akira Toriyama's Dragon Ball, Sui Ishida's Tokyo Ghoul, Hiromu Arakawa's Fullmetal Alchemist, and other works. We will also engage several anime adaptations, such as Noriyuki Abe's Yu Yu Hakusho: Ghost Files, Mitsuru Hongo's Outlaw Star, Shinichiro Watanabe's Cowboy Bebop and Daisuke Nishio's Dragon Ball Z. Major assignments will include quizzes, short literary analysis papers, an in-class oral presentation, a midterm exam, and a comprehensive final exam on the material.

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1.00
HAY 319
ENG-180-02
Chinese Science Fiction
Healey C
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
ASI-112-02=ENG-180-02 Over the past decade, Chinese science fiction in translation has garnered attention worldwide, winning international awards and bringing Chinese literature to a wider audience than ever before. The genre is often seen as a way of representing China's breakneck economic and technological development in a political environment where censorship is the norm. This course will consider the development of Chinese science fiction from the early twentieth century to the present. Stories will touch on themes ranging from cyborgs to alien invasion to environmental catastrophe. We will consider Chinese science fiction's unique contributions to both Chinese literary tradition and global science fiction. All readings will be in English.

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1.00 LFA
DET 111
ENG-202-01
Writing With Power and Grace
Whitney J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00 LS
DET 211
ENG-210-01
Writing for the Web
Pavlinich E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
This course unfolds at the intersections of creative writing and technology. Design your own website. Create an interactive environment. Manipulate code to make poetry. We will explore a range of digital humanities, including open-access research design, digital mapping, and multimodal writing. Students will craft texts in multiple genres, such as personal narratives, free-verse poetry, and drama. Then, we will practice using a series of digital platforms that enhance storytelling by representing narratives in multiple modes: visual, auditory, spatial, and more. By the end of the semester, students will have experience with computer coding, digital mapping, crafting original work in Google Sites, and video production. There are no prerequisites or tech requirements for this course. No previous knowledge of coding is necessary. Computers, cameras, and apps will be made available, so it is not necessary to own a personal laptop to complete this course successfully. Most of the resources featured here are freely available so students develop multimodal writing skills for diverse media and contexts that are applicable beyond our class together.

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1.00
BAX 312
ENG-214-01
Intro. British Lit. After 1900
Brewer A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
CEN 300
ENG-260-01
Introduction to Black Studies
Lake T
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ENG-260-01=BLS-201-01
1.00
CEN 305
ENG-270-01
Law & Literature
Whitney J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
ENG-270-01=BLS-270-02 What does reading literature teach us about the connections between race and law? How can legal and literary texts be read to understand issues of race and justice? In this class, we will discuss how literature (both fiction and non-fiction) examines the way the law negotiates and reinforces systems of race, bias and racism. We will think about the ways in which different literary works depict the law and encourage us to be skilled interpreters/critics of the law. Assigned reading material will include Bryan Stevenson's Just Mercy, Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, and legal writings from a number of legal scholars such as Michelle Alexander and Cheryl Harris. Major assignments will include quizzes, short literary analysis essays, an in-class oral presentation, and a final exam. Students interested in either attending law school or doing any public policy work are highly encouraged to take the course.

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1.00 LFA
CEN 304
ENG-310-01
Southern Gothic Literature
Benedicks C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
ENG-310-01=BLS-300-03=GEN-300-01 This class is about the ghosts that haunt the literature of the American South. After the Civil War, when the ideal of the pastoral plantation crumbled, Southern writers sought to contend with the brutal historic realities that had always lurked behind the white-pillared façade: poverty, violence, slavery, racism, patriarchy. Southern Gothic literature-which emerged in the early 19th century and continues strong today-is marked by dark humor, transgressive desires, grotesque violence, folk spiritualism, hereditary sins, emotional and environmental isolation, supernatural forces, and punishing madness. In this class, we will listen to the stories that the ghosts of the American South have told, and still tell today.

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1.00 LFA
CEN 215
ENG-310-02
The Classic Stage
Cherry J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
THE-215-01=ENG-310-02
1.00 LFA
FIN TGRR
ENG-370-01
Neurodiversity Lit,Film,TV
Benedicks C
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
This class addresses multiple ways of knowing, experiencing, and representing the world. We will explore literary and media representations of and by people on the Autism Spectrum. While neurodivergency is often considered "abnormal," we will take it seriously as a valid form of meaning-making. We will read novels and short stories by people on the Autism Spectrum as well as analyze film and TV representations of neurodivergency. We will also address the growing body of theory on neurodiversity and its place in education and society. I welcome everyone to this class regardless of major or experience; however, I would like to have a brief conversation with you before you enroll in the course.

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1.00 LFA
MXI 109
ENG-411-01
Business & Technical Writing
Pavlinich E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prerequisite: FRC-101 Enduring Questions,
and junior or senior standing
1.00 LS
GOO 104
ENG-499-01
Capstone Portfolio
Benedicks C
TBA
TBA - TBA
ENG-311,
312,
or 313
0.50 LS
TBA TBA
FRC - FRESHMAN COLLOQUIUM
FRC-101-01
Enduring Questions
Poffald E
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
GOO 006
FRC-101-02
Enduring Questions
Burton P
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
HAY 001
FRC-101-03
Enduring Questions
Krause D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
GOO 305
FRC-101-04
Enduring Questions
Himsel S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
BAX 212
FRC-101-05
Enduring Questions
Gower J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
CEN 304
FRC-101-06
Enduring Questions
Bost A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
HAY 002
FRC-101-07
Enduring Questions
Royalty B
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
BAX 201
FRC-101-08
Enduring Questions
Pavlinich E
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
DET 112
FRC-101-09
Enduring Questions
Pittard M
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
MXI 214
FRC-101-10
Enduring Questions
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
BAX 301
FRC-101-11
Enduring Questions
Reed Jay J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
CEN 305
FRC-101-12
Enduring Questions
Makubuya J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
DET 211
FRC-101-13
Enduring Questions
Lindsay E
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
LIB LSEM
FRC-101-14
Enduring Questions
Carlson B
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
HAY 321
FRC-101-15
Enduring Questions
Vogel H
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
FIN M140
FRC-101-16
Enduring Questions
Drury J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
MXI 109
FRC-101-17
Enduring Questions
Mikek P
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
BAX 311
FRE - FRENCH
FRE-102-01
Elementary French II
Altergott R
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: FRE-101,
or FRE-102 placement
1.00 WL
DET 112
FRE-102L-01
Elementary French II Lab
M. Cuoc
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Corequisite: FRE-102
0.00
DET 226
FRE-102L-02
Elementary French II Lab
M. Cuoc
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Corequisite: FRE-102
0.00
DET 226
FRE-103-01
Accelerated Elementary French
Quandt K
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00 WL
DET 212
FRE-103L-01
Accelerated Elem French Lab
M. Cuoc
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
0.00
DET 226
FRE-103L-02
Accelerated Elem French Lab
M. Cuoc
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
0.00
DET 220
FRE-103L-03
Accelerated Elem French Lab
M. Cuoc
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
0.00
DET 226
FRE-202-01
French Lang & Francophone Cult
Quandt K
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisite: FRE-201,
or FRE-202 placement
Immersion study in Paris and Normandy
1.00 WL
DET 226
FRE-202L-01
French Lng/Francophne Cult Lab
M. Cuoc
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Corequisite: FRE-202
0.00
DET 226
FRE-277-01
French Colonial Hist. & Media
Altergott R
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FRE-277-01=HIS-230-02=BLS-270-01 Who gets to write History? This seminar will approach French colonial history through the lens of the "archive" as a site of knowledge and power. What alternative modes of knowledge production and preservation have risen to challenge dominant historical narratives across the Francophone world? How do the formal aspects and possibilities of a medium change how memories get transmitted? Drawing from historical sources, novels, and multimedia objects-from podcasts to photographs, graphic novels, and video games-we will learn to critique imperial modes of representation and elaborate a new definition of "the archival" through orality, repertoire, testimony, historical fiction, and other Francophone cultural productions. This course will be taught in English, and we will use English translations of French texts. Those taking the course for credit towards the French major or minor will be expected to do the readings and written assignments in French. This course is cross-listed with History and Black Studies. It also satisfies requirements for the Film and Digital Media minor, as well as the diversity requirement for PPE majors.

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1.00 HPR, LFA
DET 128
FRE-302-01
Intro to Literature
Quandt K
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequisite: FRE-301
Immersion study in Paris and Normandy
1.00 LFA
DET 220
GEN - GENDER STUDIES
GEN-101-01
Intro to Gender Studies
Vogel H
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00 HPR, LFA
FIN M140
GEN-171-01
Classical Mythology
Barnes R
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
CLA-101-01=GEN-171-01
1.00 LFA
DET 209
GEN-209-01
Charlotte Perkins Gilman
McCrary L
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
GEN-209-01=PSC-330-01=PPE-338-02 Learn from a polymath, pioneering social reformer-a woman who was also an economist, sociologist, novelist, lecturer, and feminist. In this class, we will read Gilman (1860-1935) on eugenics, utopia, architecture, clothing, children, the family, and more. We will study her as a Machiavellian, a pragmatist, and a pull-yourself-up-by-your-bootstraps American. Students will conduct original research into The Forerunner, a magazine Gilman wrote from front to back-even the advertisements. Students will read sections of The Forerunner and come together to discuss the political ideas they encounter there, before developing their own original analysis of those sections.

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1.00
LIB LSEM
GEN-300-01
Southern Gothic Literature
Benedicks C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
ENG-105,106,107,109,160,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,260,
or 297
GEN-300-01=ENG-310-01=BLS-300-03 This class is about the ghosts that haunt the literature of the American South. After the Civil War, when the ideal of the pastoral plantation crumbled, Southern writers sought to contend with the brutal historic realities that had always lurked behind the white-pillared façade: poverty, violence, slavery, racism, patriarchy. Southern Gothic literature-which emerged in the early 19th century and continues strong today-is marked by dark humor, transgressive desires, grotesque violence, folk spiritualism, hereditary sins, emotional and environmental isolation, supernatural forces, and punishing madness. In this class, we will listen to the stories that the ghosts of the American South have told, and still tell today.

[show more]

1.00 LFA
CEN 215
GEN-304-01
Bioethics
Rognlie D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
ENG-105,106,107,109,160,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,260,
or 297
PHI-319-01=PPE-329-01=GHL-310-01=GEN-304-01 Controversies in bioethics have become a regular part of contemporary life. We are in the midst of a biological and technological revolution that raises interesting and important ethical, political, and philosophical questions. Focused especially on concepts of autonomy and dependency, we will explore asking: When does life begin? How do we define death? What life is worth living, who decides, and how? What does it mean to suffer from disease and disability? Should we mandate vaccination for disease? Should we use new technologies for human enhancement? What is a good relationship between a patient and caregivers? What is informed consent and how do we decide who is competent to give it? What is trauma-informed care? Gender-affirming care? Who should take care of our elders and how should we approach end-of-life care? What is our responsibility for providing a just distribution of health-care resources in our communities, both local and global? We'll consider these questions and more in a seminar discussion format. Background in biology suggested. Interested students who don't satisfy the prerequisites should contact the instructor.

[show more]

1.00
CEN 300
GEN-324-01
Sports, War, and Masculinity
Thomas S
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
HIS-240,
241,
242,
244,
or 245
HIS-340-01=GEN-324-01 Throughout history, sport has been an expression and a reflection of human conflict and aggression and a critical tool for teaching the virtues of manliness and defining masculinity. In America, sport has often been associated with war-preparing good soldiers-the better the athlete the better the soldier, while making boys into men. This course will explore the connection between sports, war and masculinity. It will examine and interpret the role of sports in America since the colonial era, and consider how sports have created an ideal of American masculinity that has contributed to American foreign policy goals. This is a course in American social and cultural history and will explore issues of gender, race, and class. It is also a course in American foreign policy and American militarism and will examine the relationship between sports, war, and masculinity within the geopolitical context of military conflict. Prerequiste: One history credit or permission of Instructor.

[show more]

1.00 HPR
CEN 304
GER - GERMAN
GER-102-01
Elementary German II
van der Kolk J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prerequisite: GER-101,
or GER-102 placement
1.00 WL
DET 212
GER-102-02
Elementary German II
van der Kolk J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: GER-101,
or GER-102 placement
1.00 WL
DET 211
GER-102L-01
Elementary German II Lab.
S. Sackniess
M
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Corequisite: GER-102
0.00
DET 220
GER-102L-02
Elementary German II Lab.
S. Sackniess
TU
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Corequisite: GER-102
0.00
DET 220
GER-102L-03
Elementary German II Lab.
S. Sackniess
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Corequisite: GER-102
0.00
DET 220
GER-102L-04
Elementary German II Lab.
S. Sackniess
TH
09:45AM - 10:35AM
Corequisite: GER-102
0.00
DET 220
GER-102L-05
Elementary German II Lab.
S. Sackniess
F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Corequisite: GER-102
0.00
DET 220
GER-202-01
German Language & Culture
Tucker B
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: GER-201,
or GER-202 placement
1.00 WL
DET 109
GER-202L-01
German Lang. & Culture Lab.
S. Sackniess
TU
09:45AM - 10:35AM
CoReq GER-202
0.00
DET 220
GER-202L-02
German Lang. & Culture Lab.
S. Sackniess
W
09:00AM - 09:50AM
CoReq GER-202
0.00
DET 220
GER-202L-03
German Lang. & Culture Lab.
S. Sackniess
W
02:10PM - 03:00PM
CoReq GER-202
0.00
DET 220
GER-302-01
Intro to Literature
van der Kolk J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: GER-301
1.00 LFA
DET 212
GER-312-01
Black Germany
Tucker B, Thomas S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
GER-312-01=HIS-230-01=BLS-280-02 Despite its widespread image as a white, racially homogenous country, Germany is home to a vibrant and growing Black community with a long and complicated history. Students in this course will explore the history of Black Germany beginning with the 19th century colonial encounters between Germany and the African diaspora and the emergence of a German born Black population. The course will consider questions of nationality, citizenship, race, and identity, such as "What does it means to be German?" and "What does it mean to be Black?" from transnational and transracial perspectives.

[show more]

1.00 LFA
BAX 114
GER-401-01
Senior Seminar in German
Redding G, Tucker B, van der Kolk J
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
GHL - GLOBAL HEALTH
GHL-103-01
Environmental Science
Carlson B
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
BIO-103-01=GHL-103-01
1.00 SL
DET 209
GHL-107-01
Health Psychology
Gunther K
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PSY-107-01=GHL-107-01
1.00 BSC
BAX 311
GHL-201-01
Sociology & Politics of Health
Gelbman S
M F
02:10PM - 03:25PM
This course is open to sophomore, juniors and seniors by Instructor permission. PSC-201=SOC-201=GHL-201.
1.00 BSC
BAX 202
GHL-212-01
The Poor and Justice
Himsel S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PSC-212-01=HIS-240-01=PPE-234-01=GHL-212-01 The economic impact of the COVID pandemic, including the evictions it caused, reflects a harsh reality: tens of millions of Americans still live in poverty although this is the richest nation on earth. What should government do about this? From the New Deal to the present, have our federal, state and local poverty initiatives done more harm or good? Have government benefits lifted citizens out of poverty or created dependency that traps them in poverty? Has government integrated citizens or continued to segregate them based upon race or wealth? Or should the focus instead be on our courts? Do they extend equal justice to the poor, or do they favor landlords and others with whom the poor do business? This is a critical time to ask these questions. Even before the pandemic struck, America had one of the highest levels of economic inequality and one of the lowest levels of economic mobility in its own history and among other industrialized nations. In addition, while the poor are participating less in politics, wealthy Americans are participating and funding politics more and more. Given the importance and difficulty of these issues, we will consider a wide variety of views including those of liberals, conservatives, and libertarians. We will ground our study not only in history but also in the present, lived experience of the urban poor as reported in Matthew Desmond's Evicted and the rural poor as reported in JD Vance's Hillbilly Elegy.

[show more]

1.00
BAX 212
GHL-224-01
Econom & Political Development
Burnette J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Prerequisite: ECO-101
ECO-224-01=PPE-264-01=GHL-224-01
1.00 BSC
BAX 201
GHL-310-01
Bioethics
Rognlie D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PHI-319-01=PPE-329-01=GHL-310-01=GEN-304-01 Controversies in bioethics have become a regular part of contemporary life. We are in the midst of a biological and technological revolution that raises interesting and important ethical, political, and philosophical questions. Focused especially on concepts of autonomy and dependency, we will explore asking: When does life begin? How do we define death? What life is worth living, who decides, and how? What does it mean to suffer from disease and disability? Should we mandate vaccination for disease? Should we use new technologies for human enhancement? What is a good relationship between a patient and caregivers? What is informed consent and how do we decide who is competent to give it? What is trauma-informed care? Gender-affirming care? Who should take care of our elders and how should we approach end-of-life care? What is our responsibility for providing a just distribution of health-care resources in our communities, both local and global? We'll consider these questions and more in a seminar discussion format. Background in biology suggested. Interested students who don't satisfy the prerequisites should contact the instructor.

[show more]

1.00
CEN 300
GRK - GREEK
GRK-102-01
Beginning Greek II
Gorey M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: GRK-101
1.00 WL
HAY 002
GRK-102L-01
Elem Greek Lab
Gorey M
TBA
TBA - TBA
Co-requisite: GRK-102
0.00
TBA TBA
GRK-301-01
Advanced Greek Reading: Poetry
Wickkiser B
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisite: GRK-201.
1.00 WL, LFA
DET 128
GRK-400-01
Senior Seminar
Wickkiser B
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00 LFA
TBA TBA
HIS - HISTORY
HIS-102-01
World Hist Since 1500
Morillo S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
HIS-102-01=ASI-260-03
1.00 HPR
BAX 202
HIS-102-02
World Hist Since 1500
Royalty B
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
HIS-102-02=ASI-260-02
1.00 HPR
BAX 101
HIS-210-01
Greek and Roman Science
Gorey M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
CLA-213-01=HIS-210-01 Archimedes, the famous Sicilian-Greek mathematician and inventor, is said to have founded the discipline of fluid dynamics in a moment of inspiration while taking a bath. But beyond the confines of Archimedes' bathtub, the evolution of what we now think of as "science" was often a freewheeling and haphazard affair, with many fascinating detours and dead ends along the way. This course will investigate ancient Greek and Roman innovations in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math, along with their varied connections to the modern world. We will study the earliest attempts to understand, quantify, and control the natural world of the ancient Mediterranean, tracing the origins and growth of modern "STEM" fields from Ancient Egypt and Babylonia to Classical Greece and Imperial Rome.

[show more]

1.00 HPR, LFA
DET 112
HIS-230-01
Black Germany
Thomas S, Tucker B
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HIS-230-01=GER-312-01=BLS-280-02 Despite its widespread image as a white, racially homogenous country, Germany is home to a vibrant and growing Black community with a long and complicated history. Students in this course will explore the history of Black Germany beginning with the 19th century colonial encounters between Germany and the African diaspora and the emergence of a German born Black population. The course will consider questions of nationality, citizenship, race, and identity, such as "What does it means to be German?" and "What does it mean to be Black?" from transnational and transracial perspectives.

[show more]

1.00
BAX 114
HIS-230-02
French Colonial Hist. & Media
Altergott R
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FRE-277-01=HIS-230-02=BLS-270-01 Who gets to write History? This seminar will approach French colonial history through the lens of the "archive" as a site of knowledge and power. What alternative modes of knowledge production and preservation have risen to challenge dominant historical narratives across the Francophone world? How do the formal aspects and possibilities of a medium change how memories get transmitted? Drawing from historical sources, novels, and multimedia objects-from podcasts to photographs, graphic novels, and video games-we will learn to critique imperial modes of representation and elaborate a new definition of "the archival" through orality, repertoire, testimony, historical fiction, and other Francophone cultural productions. This course will be taught in English, and we will use English translations of French texts. Those taking the course for credit towards the French major or minor will be expected to do the readings and written assignments in French. This course is cross-listed with History and Black Studies. It also satisfies requirements for the Film and Digital Media minor, as well as the diversity requirement for PPE majors.

[show more]

1.00 HPR, LFA
DET 128
HIS-230-03
The Beatles
Royalty B
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HIS-230-01=MUS-204-03 The four lads from Liverpool were arguably the most significant cultural event of the mid-20th c, from popular music to fashion, politics, and religion. This course will study the Beatles in their social, political and cultural context, from post-war Britain of the 1940s, through the economic and social recovery of the 50s, and the swinging and turbulent 60s. We will use a range of methods including social and cultural history as well as musicology.

[show more]

1.00 HPR, LFA
BAX 114
HIS-240-01
The Poor and Justice
Himsel S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HIS-240-01=PSC-212-01=PPE-234-01=GHL-212-01 The economic impact of the COVID pandemic, including the evictions it caused, reflects a harsh reality: tens of millions of Americans still live in poverty although this is the richest nation on earth. What should government do about this? From the New Deal to the present, have our federal, state and local poverty initiatives done more harm or good? Have government benefits lifted citizens out of poverty or created dependency that traps them in poverty? Has government integrated citizens or continued to segregate them based upon race or wealth? Or should the focus instead be on our courts? Do they extend equal justice to the poor, or do they favor landlords and others with whom the poor do business? This is a critical time to ask these questions. Even before the pandemic struck, America had one of the highest levels of economic inequality and one of the lowest levels of economic mobility in its own history and among other industrialized nations. In addition, while the poor are participating less in politics, wealthy Americans are participating and funding politics more and more. Given the importance and difficulty of these issues, we will consider a wide variety of views including those of liberals, conservatives, and libertarians. We will ground our study not only in history but also in the present, lived experience of the urban poor as reported in Matthew Desmond's Evicted and the rural poor as reported in JD Vance's Hillbilly Elegy.

[show more]

1.00 BSC, HPR
BAX 212
HIS-240-02
Malcolm and Mandela
Thomas S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HIS-240-02=BLS-280-01 This course considers the overlapping lives and legacies of Malcolm X and Nelson Mandela, two revolutionary figures whose influence on the fight for civil rights in America and Africa was profound and far reaching. Though the American public rarely imagined them as political bedfellows in their time, their lives had striking autobiographical similarities and pan-African connections. Students will examine the convergences and confluences of their biographies, political ideologies, and activism while exploring broader issues including colonialism, civil disobedience, cultural resistance, social justice, and freedom. We will consider how their lives intersected in the transnational struggle for racial equality and how their legacies continue to shape contemporary debates about black identity and the continued crisis of American race relations. Notably, students will also connect the lives of both men to Black experience at Wabash College and the Crawfordsville community since the 1950s.

[show more]

1.00 HPR
MXI 214
HIS-243-01
US Since 1945
Warner R
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00
MXI 109
HIS-252-01
Peoples & Nations of Lat Amer
Warner R
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
MXI 109
HIS-262-01
Modern China
Healey C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
ASI-260-01=HIS-262-01=HIS-360-01 An introduction to modern Chinese history and cultural traditions from the late 1800s to the present, outlining themes such as nation-building, socialism, social movements, economic development, memory, gender, international relations, and the relationship between art and politics. The class will analyze a variety of primary sources (in translation), such as speeches, editorials, memoirs, fiction, film, documentary, photography, visual art, and popular music. All readings in English.

[show more]

1.00 HPR
DET 111
HIS-272-01
Africa Since 1885
Warner R
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
HIS-272-01=BLS-280-05=HIS-370-01
1.00
MXI 109
HIS-300-01
Swords, Sorcery and Reality
Morillo S
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequisite: at least 0.5 credit in HIS
This course will examine some of the great works of fantasy literature, especially in the subgenre described as "Sword and Sorcery" -- that is fantasy lit that describes combat that derives from (popular) impressions of medieval warfare -- including Tolkien and some visual fantasy such as Game of Thrones. It will place that literature in comparison with descriptions of and analysis of actual medieval warfare, especially as seen in primary source documents describing medieval combat and warfare more generally. The twin goal of the course will be to better understand medieval military history, and to evaluate how well medieval fantasy authors captured the essentials of that history in fictional form (with added magic!). A final project will involve students writing their own sword and sorcery short story that incorporates the lessons of the course.

[show more]

1.00 HPR
BAX 212
HIS-340-01
Sports, War, and Masculinity
Thomas S
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
Prerequisite: One previous credit in History
HIS-340-01=GEN-324-01 Throughout history, sport has been an expression and a reflection of human conflict and aggression and a critical tool for teaching the virtues of manliness and defining masculinity. In America, sport has often been associated with war-preparing good soldiers-the better the athlete the better the soldier, while making boys into men. This course will explore the connection between sports, war and masculinity. It will examine and interpret the role of sports in America since the colonial era, and consider how sports have created an ideal of American masculinity that has contributed to American foreign policy goals. This is a course in American social and cultural history and will explore issues of gender, race, and class. It is also a course in American foreign policy and American militarism and will examine the relationship between sports, war, and masculinity within the geopolitical context of military conflict. Prerequiste: One history credit or permission of Instructor.

[show more]

1.00 HPR
CEN 304
HIS-360-01
Modern China
Healey C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1 course from HIS
ASI-260-01=HIS-262-01=HIS-360-01 Instructor consent and one previous credit in history. An introduction to modern Chinese history and cultural traditions from the late 1800s to the present, outlining themes such as nation-building, socialism, social movements, economic development, memory, gender, international relations, and the relationship between art and politics. The class will analyze a variety of primary sources (in translation), such as speeches, editorials, memoirs, fiction, film, documentary, photography, visual art, and popular music. All readings in English.

[show more]

1.00 HPR
DET 111
HIS-370-01
Africa Since 1885
Warner R
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
.5 credits from HIS HIST
HIS-272-01=BLS-280-06=HIS-270-01
1.00
MXI 109
HIS-497-01
Historiography
Morillo S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
BAX 201
HSP - HISPANIC STUDIES
HSP-252-01
Peoples & Nations of Lat Amer
Warner R
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HSP-252-01=HIS-252-01
1.00 HPR
MXI 109
HSP-300-01
Hispanic Democracy
Rogers D
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.5 credit from HIS
1.00
TBA TBA
HSP-300-02
Return Migration in Mexico
R. Hernandez
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.5 credit from HIS
1.00
TBA TBA
HSP-312-01
History of Mexican Film
Rogers D
TU
01:10PM - 03:55PM
TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
SPA-312-01=HSP-312-01
1.00
DET 109
HSP-312-02
Art and Social Practice
Strader A, Corona-Aguilera J
TU TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
PreReq SPA-301 and 302
The field of Social Practice blurs the line between life and art, emphasizing creative work that connects to current social and cultural issues. Students will develop projects in response to social and cultural issues that are relevant to them, once areas of interest are identified they will research various strategies for expression to create socially engaged art projects. The course pays particular attention to underrepresented artists to better understand the ways in which social practice artists use evocative and agitational strategies to subvert oppressive systems. Among other topics we will consider issues of place, identity, immigration, climate, the role of the global majority in the social fabric, the nature of public space, and using art as a conduit for creative transformation in our contemporary life.

[show more]

1.00 LFA
FIN A124
HUM - HUMANITIES
HUM-121-01
Language Variation and Change
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prerequisite: ENG-122 or HUM-122 or MLL-122
MLL-121-01=HUM-121-01=ENG-121-01 2nd half semester course
0.50 LS
DET 209
HUM-122-02
Modern Linguistics
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MLL-122-01=HUM-122-02=ENG-122-01 1st half semester course
0.50 LS
DET 209
HUM-176-01
Religion and Film
Nelson D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
REL-194-01=HUM-176-01
1.00
BAX 101
HUM-295-01
Religion and Film
Nelson D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
REL-294-01=HUM-295-01
1.00
BAX 101
LAT - LATIN
LAT-102-01
Beginning Latin II
Hartnett J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Prerequisite: LAT-101,
or LAT-102 placement
1.00 WL
DET 111
LAT-102L-01
Beginning Latin Lab II
Hartnett J
TU
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CoReq LAT-102
0.00
DET 111
LAT-102L-02
Beginning Latin Lab II
Hartnett J
TU
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq LAT-102
0.00
DET 111
LAT-303-01
Advanced Latin Reading: Virgil
Gorey M
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prerequisite: LAT-201
1.00 WL, LFA
DET 128
LAT-400-01
Senior Seminar
Wickkiser B
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00 LFA
TBA TBA
MAT - MATHEMATICS
MAT-103-01
Probability
Westphal C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1st half semester course.
0.50 QL
GOO 101
MAT-111-01
Calculus I
Pervenecki T
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
MAT-100 with a minimum grade of C-,
or MAT-111 placement,
or permission of the instructor
1.00 QL
HAY 003
MAT-111-02
Calculus I
Poffald E
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
MAT-100 with a minimum grade of C-,
or MAT-111 placement,
or permission of the instructor
1.00 QL
GOO 101
MAT-112-01
Calculus II
Borjigin S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prerequisite: MAT-110 or MAT-111 with a minimum grade of C-, or MAT-112 placement
1.00 QL
GOO 101
MAT-112-02
Calculus II
Borjigin S
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: MAT-110 or MAT-111 with a minimum grade of C-, or MAT-112 placement
1.00 QL
HAY 003
MAT-219-01
Combinatorics
Ansaldi K
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
MAT-223
1.00
HAY 001
MAT-223-01
Linear Algebra
Westphal C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisite: MAT-112 with a minimum grade of C-,
or MAT-223 placement.
1.00 QL
GOO 101
MAT-224-01
Differential Equations
Pervenecki T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prereq MAT-112 with a minimum grade of C- and 223.
1.00
GOO 101
MAT-225-01
Multivariable Calculus
Poffald E
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisites: MAT-112 with a minimum grade of C-,
and MAT-223
1.00 QL
TBA TBA
MAT-254-01
Statistical Models
Pervenecki T
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
MAT-112
1st half semester course.
0.50
GOO 101
MAT-277-01
Image Processing
Borjigin S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisites: CSC-111 and MAT-223.
MAT-277-01=CSC-271-01 This course provides an introduction to basic concepts and techniques in digital image processing. Topics may include intensity transformations, spatial filtering, filtering in the frequency domain, image restoration and reconstruction, color image processing, wavelets and multiresolution processing, image compression, and image segmentation.

[show more]

1.00
HAY 003
MAT-331-01
Abstract Algebra I
Ansaldi K
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prerequisite: MAT-223 with a minimum grade of C-
1.00
HAY 002
MAT-344-01
Complex Analysis
Poffald E
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
MAT-223
1.00
GOO 006
MAT-355-01
Regression Models
Pervenecki T
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
MAT-223,
MAT-253,
and MAT-254
2nd half semester course.
0.50
GOO 101
MLL - MODERN LANGUAGES
MLL-121-01
Language Variation & Change
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prerequisite: ENG-122 or HUM-122 or MLL-122
MLL-121-01=HUM-121-01=ENG-121-01 2nd half semester course
0.50 LS
DET 209
MLL-122-01
Modern Linguistics
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MLL-122-01=HUM-122-02=ENG-122-01 1st half semester course
0.50 LS
DET 209
MSL - MILITARY SCIENCE & LEADERSHIP
MSL-001-01
Leadership Lab (ROTC)
Staff
TH
03:30PM - 05:20PM
This is a course for ROTC students at the campus of Purdue University and follows Purdue's term dates. Purdue's Spring semester dates are January 9 - April 29, 2023. Purdue's Spring Break is March 13-18, 2023 (Monday - Saturday).
0.00
TBA TBA
MSL-102-01
Foundations of Leadershp ROTC
Staff
TH
12:30PM - 01:20PM
This is a course for ROTC students at the campus of Purdue University and follows Purdue's term dates. Purdue's Spring semester dates are January 9 - April 29, 2023. Purdue's Spring Break is March 13-18, 2023 (Monday - Saturday).
0.00
TBA TBA
MSL-202-01
Army Doctrine/Decis Mkng ROTC
Staff
TU TH
01:30PM - 02:20PM
This is a course for ROTC students at the campus of Purdue University and follows Purdue's term dates. Purdue's Spring semester dates are January 9 - April 29, 2023. Purdue's Spring Break is March 13-18, 2023 (Monday - Saturday).
0.00
TBA TBA
MSL-302-01
App Ldrshp Small Unit Op ROTC
Staff
TU TH
01:30PM - 02:45PM
This is a course for ROTC students at the campus of Purdue University and follows Purdue's term dates. Purdue's Spring semester dates are January 9 - April 29, 2023. Purdue's Spring Break is March 13-18, 2023 (Monday - Saturday).
0.00
TBA TBA
MSL-402-01
Company Grade Ldrshp ROTC
Staff
TU TH
10:30AM - 11:45AM
This is a course for ROTC students at the campus of Purdue University and follows Purdue's term dates. Purdue's Spring semester dates are January 9 - April 29, 2023. Purdue's Spring Break is March 13-18, 2023 (Monday - Saturday).
0.00
TBA TBA
MUS - MUSIC
MUS-052-01
Chamber Orchestra (No Credit)
Abel A
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
MUS-053-01
Glee Club (No Credit)
Williams S
M TU W TH
04:15PM - 06:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
MUS-055-01
Jazz Ensemble (no Credit)
Pazera C
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
MUS-101-01
Music in Society: A History
Ables M
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00 LFA
FIN M120
MUS-107-01
Music Fundamentals
Ables M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00 LFA
FIN M120
MUS-152-01
Chamber Orchestra
Abel A
M
04:00PM - 06:30PM
0.50
FIN CONC
MUS-153-01
Glee Club
Williams S
M TU W TH
04:15PM - 06:00PM
0.50 LFA
FIN CONC
MUS-155-01
Jazz Ensemble
Pazera C
TU
07:00PM - 09:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
MUS-156-01
Wamidan World Music Ensemble
Makubuya J
W F
04:15PM - 05:30PM
0.50 LFA
FIN CONC
MUS-160-01
Beginning Applied Music
Abel A
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or departmental exam,
or instructor permission
0.00
TBA TBA
MUS-160-03
Beginning Applied Music
Everett C
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or departmental exam,
or instructor permission
0.00
TBA TBA
MUS-160-05
Beginning Applied Music
Norton D
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or departmental exam,
or instructor permission
0.00
TBA TBA
MUS-160-06
Beginning Applied Music
Pazera C
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or departmental exam,
or instructor permission
0.00
TBA TBA
MUS-161-01
Beginning Applied Music
Abel A
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or department placement exam,
and MUS-160,
or instructor permnission.
0.50
TBA TBA
MUS-161-03
Beginning Applied Music
Everett C
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or department placement exam,
and MUS-160,
or instructor permnission.
0.50
TBA TBA
MUS-161-04
Beginning Applied Music
C. Pingel
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or department placement exam,
and MUS-160,
or instructor permnission.
0.50
TBA TBA
MUS-161-05
Beginning Applied Music
Norton D
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or department placement exam,
and MUS-160,
or instructor permnission.
0.50
TBA TBA
MUS-161-06
Beginning Applied Music
Pazera C
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or department placement exam,
and MUS-160,
or instructor permnission.
0.50
TBA TBA
MUS-202-01
Instruments & Culture
Makubuya J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
FIN M120
MUS-204-01
Teaching Jazz Improvisation
Williams S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MUS-204-01=EDU-230-01 This course will focus on learning how to improvise with the Blues, and then teaching that improvisational skill to K - 12 school-age students in their native educational environment. Students will spend the first six weeks of the course on the Wabash campus learning, first, how to improvise with the blues and, second, how to teach this skill to younger students. Wabash students will be divided up into groups of 2 - 3 who will then be placed in a classroom corresponding with their age-level interests. The second half of the course will then be spent in an area K - 12 music classroom, teaching school-age students these improvisational skills. Wabash students will receive specific pedagogical methods appropriate for the age group in which they will be working, and the instructor will be able to observe their in-classroom teaching several times throughout the second half of the semester. While the ability to read music is not a requirement for this class, the willingness to sing for others (for teaching and demonstration) is a necessity.

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1.00 LFA
FIN CONC
MUS-204-03
The Beatles
Royalty B
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
The four lads from Liverpool were arguably the most significant cultural event of the mid-20th c, from popular music to fashion, politics, and religion. This course will study the Beatles in their social, political and cultural context, from post-war Britain of the 1940s, through the economic and social recovery of the 50s, and the swinging and turbulent 60s. We will use a range of methods including social and cultural history as well as musicology.

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1.00
BAX 114
MUS-206-01
European Music Since 1750
Ables M
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
FIN TGRR
MUS-260-01
Intermediate Applied Music I
Abel A
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-161,
or two semesters of MUS-160.
0.00
TBA TBA
MUS-260-05
Intermediate Applied Music I
Norton D
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-161,
or two semesters of MUS-160.
0.00
TBA TBA
MUS-260-06
Intermediate Applied Music I
Pazera C
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-161,
or two semesters of MUS-160.
0.00
TBA TBA
MUS-261-02
Intermediate Applied Music I
B. Wilson
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-260.
0.50
TBA TBA
MUS-261-03
Intermediate Applied Music I
Everett C
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-260.
0.50
TBA TBA
MUS-261-04
Intermediate Applied Music I
C. Pingel
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-260.
0.50
TBA TBA
MUS-261-05
Intermediate Applied Music I
Norton D
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-260.
0.50
TBA TBA
MUS-360-05
Intermediate Applied Music II
Norton D
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-261 or two semesters of MUS-260.
0.00
TBA TBA
MUS-361-03
Intermediate Applied Music II
Everett C
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-360.
0.50
TBA TBA
MUS-361-04
Intermediate Applied Music II
C. Pingel
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-360.
0.50
TBA TBA
MUS-460-06
Advanced Applied Music
Pazera C
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-361,
or two semesters of MUS-360.
0.00
TBA TBA
MUS-461-06
Advanced Applied Music
Pazera C
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-460.
0.50
TBA TBA
NSC - NEUROSCIENCE
NSC-204-01
Principles of Neuroscience
Gunther K
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
NSC-204-001=PSY-204-01
1.00
BAX 202
NSC-310-01
Molecular Endocrinology
Walsh H
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
NSC-310-01=BIO-371-01 Hormones, the chemical signals of the endocrine system, rely on receptors and signal transduction pathways to carry out their powerful physiological, neural, and behavioral effects. This course will examine the molecular and cellular mechanisms of hormone action through primary scientific literature analysis and extensive writing. Students will learn to integrate concepts from molecular biology, cell biology, neuroscience, physiology, and pharmacology while emphasizing the contributions basic endocrine research to human health. This course counts as an elective for the Biology and Biochemistry majors and the Neuroscience minor.

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1.00
HAY 001
NSC-332-01
Rsrch in Sensation & Percept
Gunther K
TU
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Prerequisite: PSY-232.
NSC-332-01=PSY-332-01
0.50 BSC
BAX 312
OCS - OFF CAMPUS STUDY
OCS-01-01
Off Campus Study
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
PE - PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE-011-01
Advanced Fitness
J. Riordan
M TU W TH
06:00AM - 07:00AM
0.00
TBA TBA
PHI - PHILOSOPHY
PHI-105-01
Intr to Philosophy: Videogames
Carlson M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00 HPR
LIB LGL
PHI-105-01SR
Intr to Philosophy: Videogames
Carlson M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00 HPR
LIB LGL
PHI-106-01
Intro to Phil: Humans & Robots
Trott A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00 HPR
CEN 215
PHI-110-01
Philosophical Ethics
Rognlie D
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00 HPR
CEN 216
PHI-110-01F
Philosophical Ethics
Rognlie D
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00 HPR
CEN 216
PHI-124-01
Philosophy and Film
Gower J
TU
01:10PM - 02:25PM
TH
01:10PM - 03:55PM
1.00 HPR
CEN 216
PHI-124-01F
Philosophy and Film
Gower J
TU
01:10PM - 02:25PM
TH
01:10PM - 03:55PM
Freshmen only
1.00 HPR
CEN 216
PHI-144-01
Introduction to Existentialism
Rognlie D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00 HPR
BAX 301
PHI-144-01F
Introduction to Existentialism
Rognlie D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Freshmen only
1.00 HPR
BAX 301
PHI-218-01
Philosophy of Commerce
Gower J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PHI-218-01=PPE-218-01
1.00 HPR
CEN 216
PHI-242-01
Foundations Modern Philosophy
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00 HPR
CEN 215
PHI-249-01
19th Cent. European Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
This course approaches 19th-century European philosophy through the treatment of four major figures whose influence continues to be felt: Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. Responding to Hegel's precedent, the three later thinkers must grapple with the relationship between systematic knowledge and history. Hegel produces a unified system of philosophy by articulating the history of knowledge in a way that denies the division of knowledge into various sub-disciplines (logic, ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, politics, and so forth). This insight into the history of knowledge guides the three other thinkers who follow even as they find various positions from which to criticize Hegel. Marx wants a more materialist philosophy, and so turns Hegel's dialectic on its head. Kierkegaard begins to expose the cracks in the project of universal systematic thinking, showing its limits by affirming the singularity of religious experience. Nietzsche makes the system break by developing a critique of metaphysics, which is to say, of any philosophical thinking purporting to operate outside of history, context, and particular motivations. So, the course begins by laying out a system of metaphysics and ends by considering why that very project might be a problem. The course will provide historical context that enriches students' understanding of existentialism and continental philosophy, but it presupposes no philosophical background.

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1.00 HPR
TBA TBA
PHI-270-01
Elem Symbolic Logic
Carlson M
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00 HPR, QL
BAX 114
PHI-272-01
Philosophy of Science
Carlson M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00 HPR
HAY 321
PHI-319-01
Bioethics
Rognlie D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Recommended prerequisite: BIO-101 or BIO-111.,
Required prerequisite: one credit from FRC-101,
PHI-110, PHI-216,
or PHI-217. Interested students who don't satisfy the prerequisites should seek instructor permission.
PHI-319-01=GHL-310-01=PPE-329-01=GEN-304-01 Controversies in bioethics have become a regular part of contemporary life. We are in the midst of a biological and technological revolution that raises interesting and important ethical, political, and philosophical questions. Focused especially on concepts of autonomy and dependency, we will explore asking: When does life begin? How do we define death? What life is worth living, who decides, and how? What does it mean to suffer from disease and disability? Should we mandate vaccination for disease? Should we use new technologies for human enhancement? What is a good relationship between a patient and caregivers? What is informed consent and how do we decide who is competent to give it? What is trauma-informed care? Gender-affirming care? Who should take care of our elders and how should we approach end-of-life care? What is our responsibility for providing a just distribution of health-care resources in our communities, both local and global? We'll consider these questions and more in a seminar discussion format. Background in biology suggested. Interested students who don't satisfy the prerequisites should contact the instructor.

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1.00 HPR
CEN 300
PHI-319-02
Social Morality
Salomon A
M W
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequisite: Take one of the following: PHI-110 PHI-218 PHI-240 or PHI-242
PHI-319-02=PPE-329-02 In order to enjoy the benefits of social cooperation, we need to live under common social rules. But, since many of us disagree about moral matters, living under common social rules risks subjecting some to the authority of others, which would threaten their freedom. How, then, can we live under moral norms that are justifiable to all (i.e., norms that are publicly justifiable)? In this course, we will closely investigate this question with the help of both classical and contemporary philosophical texts. (Readings will draw from the work of philosophers such as Gerald Gaus, Thomas Hobbes, John Stuart Mill, David Schmidtz, Peter Strawson, and Kevin Vallier.) In addition to grappling with the aforementioned question, we will address related topics such as: What role does freedom of expression play in allowing those who disagree about morality to live together without pushing each other around? What is the relationship between public justification and social trust?

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1.00
CEN 300
PHY - PHYSICS
PHY-101-01
Astronomy
Ross G
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00 QL, SL
GOO 104
PHY-101L-01
Astronomy Lab
Ross G
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-101
0.00
GOO 205
PHY-101L-02
Astronomy Lab
Ross G
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-101
0.00
GOO 205
PHY-110-01
Physics II - Algebra
Tompkins N
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prerequisite: PHY-109 or PHY-111,
or approval of instructor
1.00 QL, SL
GOO 104
PHY-110L-01
Physics II - Algebra Lab
Tompkins N
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Corequisite: PHY-110
0.00
GOO 201
PHY-110L-02
Physics II - Algebra Lab
Tompkins N
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Corequisite: PHY-110
0.00
GOO 201
PHY-112-01
Physics II - Calculus
Krause D
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Prerequisite: PHY-111 with a minimum grade of C-
1.00 QL, SL
GOO 104
PHY-112L-01
General Physics Lab
Krause D
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Corequisite: PHY-112
0.00
GOO 201
PHY-112L-02
General Physics Lab
Krause D
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Corequisite: PHY-112
0.00
GOO 201
PHY-210-01
Intro Quantum Theory & Apps
Brown J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisite: PHY-209 with a minimum grade of C-,
and MAT-223
1.00
GOO 310
PHY-210L-01
Intro Quantum Theor & App Lab
Brown J
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Corequisite: PHY-210
0.00
GOO 306
PHY-220-01
Electronics
Brown J
M W F
08:00AM - 09:50AM
This a class/lab period combined.
1.00 QL, SL
GOO 307
PHY-314-01
Electromagnetic Theory
Ross G
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Prerequisite: PHY-112 with a minimum grade of C-,
MAT-224, and MAT-225
1.00
GOO 305
PHY-381-01
Advanced Laboratory I
Tompkins N
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Prerequisite: PHY-210
0.50
GOO 305
PHY-382-01
Advanced Laboratory II
Tompkins N
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Prerequisite: PHY-381
0.50
GOO 305
PPE - PHILOSOPHY POLITICS ECONOMICS
PPE-200-01
Introduction to PPE
Snow N, Salomon A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisite: completion or concurrent enrollment in ECO-101,
PHI-110,
and one of the PSC intro courses,
each with a minimum grade of C-,
or consent of the instructor.
1.00 BSC
MXI 213
PPE-200-02
Introduction to PPE
McCrary L, Salomon A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: completion or concurrent enrollment in ECO-101,
PHI-110,
and one of the PSC intro courses,
each with a minimum grade of C-,
or consent of the instructor.
1.00 BSC
CEN 215
PPE-218-01
Philosophy of Commerce
Gower J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PHI-218-01=PPE-218-01
1.00 HPR
CEN 216
PPE-234-01
The Poor and Justice
Himsel S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PSC-212-01=HIS-240-01=PPE-234-01=GHL-212-01 The economic impact of the COVID pandemic, including the evictions it caused, reflects a harsh reality: tens of millions of Americans still live in poverty although this is the richest nation on earth. What should government do about this? From the New Deal to the present, have our federal, state and local poverty initiatives done more harm or good? Have government benefits lifted citizens out of poverty or created dependency that traps them in poverty? Has government integrated citizens or continued to segregate them based upon race or wealth? Or should the focus instead be on our courts? Do they extend equal justice to the poor, or do they favor landlords and others with whom the poor do business? This is a critical time to ask these questions. Even before the pandemic struck, America had one of the highest levels of economic inequality and one of the lowest levels of economic mobility in its own history and among other industrialized nations. In addition, while the poor are participating less in politics, wealthy Americans are participating and funding politics more and more. Given the importance and difficulty of these issues, we will consider a wide variety of views including those of liberals, conservatives, and libertarians. We will ground our study not only in history but also in the present, lived experience of the urban poor as reported in Matthew Desmond's Evicted and the rural poor as reported in JD Vance's Hillbilly Elegy.

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1.00
BAX 212
PPE-238-01
Protest & Policy in the Us
Gelbman S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PSC-210-01=PPE-238-01-BLS-280-05 This course examines the role of protest as a means of political expression that has been used by a variety of political actors seeking to change the policies and political practices of the United States throughout its history. The focus will be on two overarching questions: Why has protest been such a fixture of American politics? And to what extent does it actually influence public policy outcomes? In addition to considering frameworks for making sense of the role of protest in the development of US public policy in general, we'll take a close look at the experiences of three specific protest movements: the mid-twentieth-century Civil Rights Movement; the Tea Party, and the contemporary Environmental Justice Movement. Students will also have the opportunity to research the policy impact of a US-based protest initiative of their choosing.

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1.00
BAX 201
PPE-251-01
Law & Economics
Snow N
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Take ECO-101
ECO-231-01=PPE-251-01
1.00 BSC
BAX 311
PPE-264-01
Econom & Political Development
Burnette J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Take ECO-101
ECO-224-01=PPE-264-01=GHL=224-01
1.00 BSC
BAX 201
PPE-329-01
Bioethics
Rognlie D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PHI-319-01=PPE-329-01=GHL-310-01=GEN-304-01 Controversies in bioethics have become a regular part of contemporary life. We are in the midst of a biological and technological revolution that raises interesting and important ethical, political, and philosophical questions. Focused especially on concepts of autonomy and dependency, we will explore asking: When does life begin? How do we define death? What life is worth living, who decides, and how? What does it mean to suffer from disease and disability? Should we mandate vaccination for disease? Should we use new technologies for human enhancement? What is a good relationship between a patient and caregivers? What is informed consent and how do we decide who is competent to give it? What is trauma-informed care? Gender-affirming care? Who should take care of our elders and how should we approach end-of-life care? What is our responsibility for providing a just distribution of health-care resources in our communities, both local and global? We'll consider these questions and more in a seminar discussion format. Background in biology suggested. Interested students who don't satisfy the prerequisites should contact the instructor.

[show more]

1.00
CEN 300
PPE-329-02
Social Morality
Salomon A
M W
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Pre-requiste: Take one of the following: PHI-110,
PHI-218, PHI-240,
or PHI-242;
PHI-319-02=PPE-329-02 In order to enjoy the benefits of social cooperation, we need to live under common social rules. But, since many of us disagree about moral matters, living under common social rules risks subjecting some to the authority of others, which would threaten their freedom. How, then, can we live under moral norms that are justifiable to all (i.e., norms that are publicly justifiable)? In this course, we will closely investigate this question with the help of both classical and contemporary philosophical texts. (Readings will draw from the work of philosophers such as Gerald Gaus, Thomas Hobbes, John Stuart Mill, David Schmidtz, Peter Strawson, and Kevin Vallier.) In addition to grappling with the aforementioned question, we will address related topics such as: What role does freedom of expression play in allowing those who disagree about morality to live together without pushing each other around? What is the relationship between public justification and social trust?

[show more]

1.00
CEN 300
PPE-330-01
Internatnl Political Economy
Irons D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequiste:Take PSC-121 or PSC-141 or Instructor Permission.
PSC-340-01=PPE-330-01 This course will introduce students to the study of international economic relations and the relationship between political and economic behavior and decision-making. Under this broad umbrella, we will examine a number of issue areas, such as trade and financial flows, monetary and fiscal policy, growth and global inequality, and economic crises. At the conclusion of the course, students will possess an understanding of 1) how domestic political institutions and partisan incentives shape international economic policy and outcomes, 2) how international economic flows influence domestic policymaking, and 3) how international economic institutions affect economic policy and outcomes.

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1.00 BSC
BAX 201
PPE-338-01
Religious Freedom
Himsel S
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PSC-315-01=PPE-338-01=REL-280-02 May a football coach pray at the 50-yard line at the end of a public school's football game? Is a state required to fund religious schools if it funds private secular schools? May the US Air Force Academy display a banner declaring "I am a member of Team Jesus Christ" in its football locker room? Are businesses required to provide health benefits like the morning after pill if doing so conflicts with their owners' religious beliefs? Should we prosecute Christian Scientist parents whose critically ill child dies because the only treatment he received was prayer? Can we accommodate the religious practices of every American in our schools, workplaces, and other institutions? If not, can we accommodate anyone's? The collision of religion, politics, and the law generates many sensitive and difficult questions. We will work through these kinds of questions to determine what our Constitution means when it forbids government from establishing religion and protects our right freely to exercise our many religions. We will also explore whether religion can play a productive role in politics without debasing itself or causing strife. This course is offered to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors.

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1.00 BSC
BAX 212
PPE-338-02
Charlotte Perkins Gilman
McCrary L
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
GEN-209-01=PSC-330-01=PPE-338-02 Learn from a polymath, pioneering social reformer-a woman who was also an economist, sociologist, novelist, lecturer, and feminist. In this class, we will read Gilman (1860-1935) on eugenics, utopia, architecture, clothing, children, the family, and more. We will study her as a Machiavellian, a pragmatist, and a pull-yourself-up-by-your-bootstraps American. Students will conduct original research into The Forerunner, a magazine Gilman wrote from front to back-even the advertisements. Students will read sections of The Forerunner and come together to discuss the political ideas they encounter there, before developing their own original analysis of those sections.

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1.00
LIB LSEM
PPE-358-01
Crime and Punishment
D'Amico D
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisites: ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C- and one 200 level ECO course with a minimum grade of D,
OR with the consent of the instructor
PPE-358-01=ECO-358-01 This class will investigate the social phenomena of crime and punishment through the analytical tool kit of political economy. Students will learn a variety of theoretical approaches and apply them to understand and explain historic and contemporary trends of crime and punishment. Theoretical approaches will include rational and strategic decision making, public goods theory, bureaucratic incentives, comparative institutional analysis, and industrial organization. Key applied topics covered during the semester will include criminal behavior, the historic origins of criminal law and law enforcement services, the potentials and limits of both public and private provisions of policing and punishment, and the historic and contemporary patterns of crime and punitive trends across social contexts. Finally, students will assess the viability of historic and current criminal justice reform movements.

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1.00 BSC
BAX 201
PSC - POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSC-121-01
Intro to Comparative Politics
Valdez J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00 BSC
BAX 202
PSC-131-01
Intro to Political Theory
McCrary L
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00 BSC
CEN 215
PSC-141-01
Intro to Intn'l Relations
Irons D
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00 BSC
BAX 114
PSC-200-01
Political Inquiry & Analysis
Gelbman S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
One credit from PSC-111,
or PSC-121,
or PSC-131,
or PSC-141. Permission from instructor required for enrollment.
This course is for students who are planning to major in Political Science. No distribution credit. No freshmen or seniors. Enrollment by instructor permission, email gelbmans@wabash.edu for permission to enroll
1.00
BAX 201
PSC-201-01
Sociology & Politics of Health
Gelbman S
M F
02:10PM - 03:25PM
This course is open to sophomore, juniors and seniors by Instructor permission. PSC-201=SOC-201=GHL-201.
1.00 BSC
BAX 202
PSC-210-01
Protest & Policy in the Us
Gelbman S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PSC-210-01=PPE-238-01=BLS-280-05 This course examines the role of protest as a means of political expression that has been used by a variety of political actors seeking to change the policies and political practices of the United States throughout its history. The focus will be on two overarching questions: Why has protest been such a fixture of American politics? And to what extent does it actually influence public policy outcomes? In addition to considering frameworks for making sense of the role of protest in the development of US public policy in general, we'll take a close look at the experiences of three specific protest movements: the mid-twentieth-century Civil Rights Movement; the Tea Party, and the contemporary Environmental Justice Movement. Students will also have the opportunity to research the policy impact of a US-based protest initiative of their choosing.

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1.00 BSC
BAX 201
PSC-212-01
The Poor and Justice
Himsel S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PSC-212-01=HIS-240-01=PPE-234-01=GHL-212-01 The economic impact of the COVID pandemic, including the evictions it caused, reflects a harsh reality: tens of millions of Americans still live in poverty although this is the richest nation on earth. What should government do about this? From the New Deal to the present, have our federal, state and local poverty initiatives done more harm or good? Have government benefits lifted citizens out of poverty or created dependency that traps them in poverty? Has government integrated citizens or continued to segregate them based upon race or wealth? Or should the focus instead be on our courts? Do they extend equal justice to the poor, or do they favor landlords and others with whom the poor do business? This is a critical time to ask these questions. Even before the pandemic struck, America had one of the highest levels of economic inequality and one of the lowest levels of economic mobility in its own history and among other industrialized nations. In addition, while the poor are participating less in politics, wealthy Americans are participating and funding politics more and more. Given the importance and difficulty of these issues, we will consider a wide variety of views including those of liberals, conservatives, and libertarians. We will ground our study not only in history but also in the present, lived experience of the urban poor as reported in Matthew Desmond's Evicted and the rural poor as reported in JD Vance's Hillbilly Elegy.

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1.00 BSC, HPR
BAX 212
PSC-242-01
American Foreign Policy
Valdez J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00 BSC
BAX 212
PSC-300-01
Research/Stats Political Sci
Irons D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00 BSC, QL
BAX 214
PSC-315-01
Religious Freedom
Himsel S
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PSC-315-01=PPE-338-01=REL-280-02 May a football coach pray at the 50-yard line at the end of a public school's football game? Is a state required to fund religious schools if it funds private secular schools? May the US Air Force Academy display a banner declaring "I am a member of Team Jesus Christ" in its football locker room? Are businesses required to provide health benefits like the morning after pill if doing so conflicts with their owners' religious beliefs? Should we prosecute Christian Scientist parents whose critically ill child dies because the only treatment he received was prayer? Can we accommodate the religious practices of every American in our schools, workplaces, and other institutions? If not, can we accommodate anyone's? The collision of religion, politics, and the law generates many sensitive and difficult questions. We will work through these kinds of questions to determine what our Constitution means when it forbids government from establishing religion and protects our right freely to exercise our many religions. We will also explore whether religion can play a productive role in politics without debasing itself or causing strife. This course is open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors

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1.00 BSC, HPR
BAX 212
PSC-330-01
Charlotte Perkins Gilman
McCrary L
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
GEN-209-01=PSC-330-01=PPE-338-02 Learn from a polymath, pioneering social reformer-a woman who was also an economist, sociologist, novelist, lecturer, and feminist. In this class, we will read Gilman (1860-1935) on eugenics, utopia, architecture, clothing, children, the family, and more. We will study her as a Machiavellian, a pragmatist, and a pull-yourself-up-by-your-bootstraps American. Students will conduct original research into The Forerunner, a magazine Gilman wrote from front to back-even the advertisements. Students will read sections of The Forerunner and come together to discuss the political ideas they encounter there, before developing their own original analysis of those sections.

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1.00 BSC
LIB LSEM
PSC-340-01
Internatnl Political Economy
Irons D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequisite: PSC-121 or PSC-141 or Instructor Permission
PSC-340-01=PPE-330-01 This course will introduce students to the study of international economic relations and the relationship between political and economic behavior and decision-making. Under this broad umbrella, we will examine a number of issue areas, such as trade and financial flows, monetary and fiscal policy, growth and global inequality, and economic crises. At the conclusion of the course, students will possess an understanding of 1) how domestic political institutions and partisan incentives shape international economic policy and outcomes, 2) how international economic flows influence domestic policymaking, and 3) how international economic institutions affect economic policy and outcomes.

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1.00 BSC
BAX 201
PSC-347-01
Conflict, War, and Peace
Valdez J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PSC-141
1.00
BAX 212
PSY - PSYCHOLOGY
PSY-101-01
Introduction to Psychology
Abel E
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00 BSC
BAX 101
PSY-101-02
Introduction to Psychology
Horton R
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00 BSC
BAX 101
PSY-101-03DCS
Introduction to Psychology
Staff
M TU W TH
TBA - TBA
This course is not available for additional enrollment to Wabash students.
1.00 BSC
TBA TBA
PSY-107-01
Health Psychology
Gunther K
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PSY-107-01=GHL-107-01
1.00 BSC
BAX 311
PSY-110-01
Happiness
Bost P
TU
02:40PM - 03:55PM
The Declaration of Independence asserts that the "pursuit of Happiness" is a fundamental right, endowed by none other than the Creator. Great news! But what exactly are we pursuing? And how do we catch it? This course will introduce students to the science of well-being and its implications for the everyday pursuit of happiness. Course activities will include exercises for increasing a sense of well-being.

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0.50 BSC
BAX 114
PSY-201-01
Research Methods & Stats I
Schmitzer-Torbert N
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Prerequisite: PSY-101
1.00 BSC, QL
BAX 214
PSY-202-01
Research Methods & Stats II
Bost P
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prerequisite: PSY-201
1.00 BSC, QL
BAX 214
PSY-204-01
Principles of Neuroscience
Gunther K
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PSY-204-01=NSC-204-01
1.00
BAX 202
PSY-214-01
Psychology and Law
Bost P
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00 BSC
BAX 301
PSY-222-01
Social Psychology
Horton R
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Prerequisite: PSY-201 (may be taken concurrently).
1.00
BAX 114
PSY-223-01
Abnormal Psychology
Abel E
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisite: PSY-101.
1.00 BSC
BAX 114
PSY-233-01
Behavioral Neuroscience
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: PSY-204,
NSC-204,
BIO-101,
or BIO-111.
1.00 BSC
BAX 311
PSY-301-01
Literature Review
Gunther K
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prerequisite: PSY-201
1.00
BAX 312
PSY-320-01
Research Developmental Psychol
Abel E
TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Prerequisites: PSY-202 and PSY-220.
0.50
BAX 312
PSY-331-01
Research Cognitive Psychology
Bost P
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PSY-202 and 231
0.50
BAX 301
PSY-332-01
Rsrch in Sensation & Percept
Gunther K
TU
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Prerequisite: PSY-232.
PSY-332-01=NSC-332-01
0.50 BSC
BAX 312
PSY-496-01
Senior Project
Bost P
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: PSY-495.
0.50
TBA TBA
PSY-496-02
Senior Project
Gunther K
TU
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisite: PSY-495.
0.50
TBA TBA
PSY-496-03
Senior Project
Horton R
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: PSY-495.
0.50
TBA TBA
PSY-496-04
Senior Project
Schmitzer-Torbert N
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: PSY-495.
0.50
TBA TBA
PSY-496-05
Senior Project
Abel E
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: PSY-495.
0.50
TBA TBA
REL - RELIGION
REL-104-01
Religions of China and Japan
Blix D
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00 HPR
CEN 216
REL-162-01
New Testament
Reed Jay J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
CLA-162-01=REL-162-01
1.00 HPR, LFA
CEN 216
REL-172-01
Reformation to Modern Era
Baer J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00 HPR
CEN 216
REL-194-01
Religion and Film
Nelson D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
REL-194-01=HUM-176-01
1.00
BAX 101
REL-210-01
Issues in Contemporary Islam
Blix D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
REL-103,
or permission of instructor
What is the shape of Islam in the contemporary world? How did it get this shape? To what extent can Islam accommodate the contemporary world, and vice versa? These are some of the questions that we'll try to answer in this course. We'll start by looking at some key moments in Islamic history. Beginning with the fall of the Abbasids in 1258, we'll look at the reconfiguration of the Abode of Islam among the Mughal, Safavid, and Ottoman empires, and move from there down to the early 1700s. We'll then read a number of primary texts by Islamic reformers from the 1700s down to the present. We'll pay special attention to the rise of so-called Islamic fundamentalism; the recent conflicts associated with Islam in the Middle East and the Asian subcontinent; ISIS, al-Qaeda, and the Taliban; Islamophobia; the status of women in Islam; and living as a Muslim in the industrial societies of modern Europe and the United States.

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1.00 HPR
CEN 305
REL-275-01
Nonviolence & Social Change
Reed Jay J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Nonviolence is a powerful way of life for courageous people committed to building peaceful communities. It remains a thriving force in contemporary America. We will study this philosophy and its religious roots in the thought and lives of Jesus, Martin Luther King, Jr., and M. K. Gandhi. We will also study, meet, and interact with current nonviolent public servants around the country who pursue nonviolent projects in public schools, prisons and disadvantaged neighborhoods and who have contributed powerfully to building movements for social and environmental justice. We will learn and practice employing nonviolent techniques and skills including restorative justice, nonviolent communication, conflict management, and conflict de-escalation and study the principles and skills of nonviolence as they have come to us from Dr. King's co-workers and successors, with whom we will also interact.

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1.00 HPR
CEN 304
REL-280-01
Religion & Sports in America
Baer J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
This seminar examines the relationship between religion and sports in American history and the contemporary United States. The world of American sports overflows with religious elements: players praying after games and speaking openly about their faith; the elevation of superstar athletes to modern gods; sports as a means of acculturation and character formation; the creation of sacred space, time, and rituals; the devotion which some fans give to their teams; the cultural worship of youth, health, and fitness; the historic connections between religious ceremonies and athletics; and much more. Drawing upon a range of disciplinary methods, we will investigate the ways religion and sports uphold similar ideals as well as the ways they are in competition with one another for the hearts, minds, bodies, and resources of their devotees.

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1.00 HPR
CEN 304
REL-280-02
Religious Freedom
Himsel S
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PSC-315-01=PPE-338-01=REL-280-02 May a football coach pray at the 50-yard line at the end of a public school's football game? Is a state required to fund religious schools if it funds private secular schools? May the US Air Force Academy display a banner declaring "I am a member of Team Jesus Christ" in its football locker room? Are businesses required to provide health benefits like the morning after pill if doing so conflicts with their owners' religious beliefs? Should we prosecute Christian Scientist parents whose critically ill child dies because the only treatment he received was prayer? Can we accommodate the religious practices of every American in our schools, workplaces, and other institutions? If not, can we accommodate anyone's? The collision of religion, politics, and the law generates many sensitive and difficult questions. We will work through these kinds of questions to determine what our Constitution means when it forbids government from establishing religion and protects our right freely to exercise our many religions. We will also explore whether religion can play a productive role in politics without debasing itself or causing strife. This course is offered to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors.

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1.00 BSC, HPR
BAX 212
REL-290-01
Ritual in Rel. & Everyday Life
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1st half semester course "All rites begin in simplicity, are brought to fulfillment in elegant form, and end in joy." So says Xunzi, the great Confucian writer of antiquity. Is he right? What are rituals? Are they routine acts, which we do simply because we've always done them? Or are they meaningful acts, which we do because they actually signify something? If the latter, what do they signify? Can we say that all rituals somehow religious? If so, why? If not, why not? In this half-course, we'll read selections from various writers on ritual. Using film and other media, we'll also look at a variety of ritual activities from different cultures, including College rituals, religious ceremonies, holidays like Thanksgiving, and the "little rituals" of everyday life in, e.g., media, sports, or politics.

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0.50 HPR
MXI 109
REL-290-02
Symbol and Myth in Religion
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
2nd half semester course Do myths and symbols belong in the skill-set of people living in a modern scientific world? Or are they playthings for nerds or soft-minded romantics? What exactly are symbols? Myths? What do they do? Are they socially constructed? Archetypal? Something else? How important are they for religion? Can you have a religion that's "demythologized"? Should you? These are some of the questions that we'll tackle in this half-course. We'll read selections from, among others, Mircea Eliade and Wendy Doniger, as well as their critics. Using film and other media, we'll also read or look at a variety of myths, both ancient and modern.

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0.50 HPR
MXI 109
REL-290-03
Uncovering Greek Religion
Wickkiser B
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
CLA-212-01=REL-290-03 The Greeks were a polytheistic society: they worshipped numerous gods. Moreover, they did so in a variety of modes and for a multitude of reasons. Using ancient literature and archaeological remains, we will consider the nature and function of the gods of the Greek pantheon, as well as the sacred spaces, festivals, dedications, and rituals through which the Greeks worshipped their deities from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period and the rise of Christianity. As we explore these topics, we will situate religion within the changing social and historical contexts of the ancient world. This entails analysis of the relation between cults and the state, especially Athenian democracy; the impact of deities and festivals on warfare, the economy, athletics, and literature; and the role of refugees, slaves, women, and other marginalized groups. The course is discussion oriented; most class periods will be spent in conversation about assigned readings. An intensive immersion component rounds out the course: we will travel to Greece from May 7-17, 2023.

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1.00 HPR, LFA
DET 128
REL-294-01
Religion & Film
Nelson D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
REL-294-01=HUM-295-01
1.00
BAX 101
REL-298-01
Sociology of Religion
Baer J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00 BSC, HPR
CEN 300
REL-370-01
Contemporary Theology
Nelson D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PreReq REL-171,
172,
173,
270,
or PHI-242
1.00
CEN 300
REL-373-01
Anti-Racist Christian Theology
Nelson D
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
REL-373-01=BLS-300-01 "Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Sometimes we must interfere." -- Elie Wiesel, Holocaust survivor. The world is finally understanding that there can be no teaching about race that is not also teaching against racism. This course will compare the Black experience in the United States, and theological reflection thereon, with Black experience under the brutal Apartheid regime in South Africa. We begin by examining first-person narratives from Black and White Americans on the harms done by racism. We will do the same with Black (Bantu), White and the so-called "Cape-Coloured" South Africans. Then we will look at histories told about how the parallel systems of oppression were conceived, installed and how they functioned. The last half of the class explores arguments made by James Cone on how the cross of Jesus Christ looks like (and unlike) a lynching tree; by South African Allan Boesak on the dangerous but tantalizing specter of "hope"; and by the womanist theologian Kelly Brown Douglas on theology in the wake of the killing of teenager Trayvon Martin.

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1.00
CEN 300
RHE - RHETORIC
RHE-101-01
Public Speaking
Clark J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00 LS
FIN S206
RHE-101-02
Public Speaking
Clark J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00 LS
FIN S206
RHE-101-03
Public Speaking
Proszek J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00 LS
FIN S206
RHE-140-01
Argumentation & Debate
Drury J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00 LS
FIN S206
RHE-280-01
Deliberation & Democracy
Anderson C
M
02:10PM - 03:00PM
W
02:10PM - 03:55PM
1.00 LS
DET 209
RHE-320-01
Classical Rhetoric
Proszek J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00 LFA
FIN S206
RHE-370-01
US Presidential Rhetoric
Drury J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
The U.S. president has become, by many estimates, the most powerful person in the world. This course considers how such power in contemporary mediated society is connected to the president's use of rhetoric. Specifically, students will explore how contemporary presidents use rhetoric to govern, with particular attention to the relationship between presidents and the American people. The course material will include presidential rhetoric but also theoretical and rhetorical criticism essays that explore the operations of that rhetoric. This course focuses on the discourse of elected presidents who speak in an official capacity, not on election campaigns or fictional portrayals of U.S. presidents. Students should expect this to be a seminar course, meaning that our class sessions will be largely student-driven discussion from assigned material. By taking this course, students will cultivate a more nuanced understanding of the operations of U.S. presidential rhetoric, culminating in a research project that analyzes a significant historical instance of presidential rhetoric.

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1.00 LFA
MXI 109
RHE-370-02
Rhetoric in the Field
Clark J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Over the last 30 years, rhetoric scholars have turned their attention to in situ rhetoric-rhetoric that happens in the moment. From major events like protests, concerts, live sports, or community gatherings to everyday places such as neighborhoods, museums and memorials, or commercial sites, their research strives to understand our lived, everyday rhetorical experiences. This class will engage with this disciplinary turn through rhetorical fieldwork, which focuses on how rhetoric and the study of rhetoric, through forms of power and resistance, influences how we create a more just and livable world for all. The central questions guiding this rhetorical fieldwork are: How are material/symbolic/embodied resources practiced, contested, and mobilized in these moments? And what influences and consequences does this have in shaping our social, political, and cultural worlds? Students will learn and critically consider the various methodological approaches to rhetorical fieldwork through facilitated discussions, site visits, multi-methodological mini-projects, and a final community-engaged research project.

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1.00 LFA
DET 212
SOC - SOCIOLOGY
SOC-201-01
Sociology & Politics of Health
Gelbman S
M F
02:10PM - 03:25PM
This course is open to sophomore, juniors and seniors by Instructor permission. PSC-201=SOC-201=GHL-201.
1.00 BSC
BAX 202
SPA - SPANISH
SPA-102-01
Elementary Spanish II
Welch M
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Prerequisite: SPA-101 or SPA-102 placement.
1.00 WL
DET 211
SPA-102L-01
Elementary Spanish II Lab
D. Gobo
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-requisite: SPA-102.
0.00
DET 128
SPA-102L-02
Elementary Spanish II Lab
D. Gobo
TU
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: SPA-102.
0.00
DET 112
SPA-102L-03
Elementary Spanish II Lab
D. Gobo
TU
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-requisite: SPA-102.
0.00
DET 226
SPA-103-01
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Rogers D
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00 WL
DET 112
SPA-103L-01
Accelerated Elem Spanish Lab
D. Gobo
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
0.00
DET 128
SPA-103L-02
Accelerated Elem Spanish Lab
D. Gobo
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
0.00
DET 128
SPA-103L-03
Accelerated Elem Spanish Lab
D. Gobo
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
0.00
DET 112
SPA-201-01
Intermediate Spanish
Hardy J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103,
or SPA-201 placement
1.00 WL
DET 211
SPA-201-02
Intermediate Spanish
Hardy J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103,
or SPA-201 placement
1.00 WL
DET 211
SPA-201L-01
Intermediate Spanish Lab
R. Velazquez Mendoza
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
0.00
DET 112
SPA-201L-02
Intermediate Spanish Lab
R. Velazquez Mendoza
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
0.00
DET 109
SPA-201L-03
Intermediate Spanish Lab
R. Velazquez Mendoza
TU
08:00AM - 08:50AM
0.00
DET 212
SPA-201L-04
Intermediate Spanish Lab
R. Velazquez Mendoza
TU
02:40PM - 03:30PM
0.00
DET 128
SPA-201L-05
Intermediate Spanish Lab
R. Velazquez Mendoza
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
0.00
DET 112
SPA-201L-06
Intermediate Spanish Lab
R. Velazquez Mendoza
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
0.00
DET 109
SPA-202-01
Span Lang & Hispanic Cultures
Greenhalgh M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: SPA-201,
or SPA-202 placement
1.00 WL
DET 209
SPA-202L-01
Span Lang/Hisp Cultures Lab
R. Velazquez Mendoza
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
0.00
DET 212
SPA-202L-02
Span Lang/Hisp Cultures Lab
R. Velazquez Mendoza
TH
02:40PM - 03:30PM
0.00
DET 128
SPA-202L-03
Span Lang/Hisp Cultures Lab
R. Velazquez Mendoza
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
0.00
DET 112
SPA-301-01
Conversation & Composition
Greenhalgh M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prerequisite: SPA-202,
or SPA-301 placement
1.00 WL
DET 109
SPA-302-01
Intro to Literature
Rogers D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prerequisite: SPA-301 or SPA-321,
or SPA-302 placement.
1.00 LFA
DET 212
SPA-312-01
History of Mexican Film
Rogers D
TU
01:10PM - 03:55PM
TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
SPA-301 or SPA-321,
and SPA-302,
Must have taken SPA-302 previously
SPA-312-01=HSP-312-01
1.00 LFA
DET 109
SPA-313-01
Adventures of Don Quijote
Greenhalgh M
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
SPA-301 or SPA-321,
Take SPA-302
1.00 LFA
DET 109
THE - THEATER
THE-101-01
Introduction to Theater
Cherry J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00 LFA
FIN M120
THE-104-01DCS
Introduction to Film
Staff
M TU W TH
TBA - TBA
This course is not available for additional enrollment to Wabash students.
1.00 LFA
TBA TBA
THE-106-01
Stagecraft
Whittredge A
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00 LFA
FIN BALL
THE-201-01
Theater Magic and Manipulation
Bear A
TU TH
08:00AM - 11:00AM
Class will start between 8-9am, depending on the day's activities. Students will be notified in advance of the meet time per day.
1.00 LFA
FIN TGRR
THE-204-01
World Cinema
Abbott M
M F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
W
02:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
FIN M120
THE-205-01
Acting for the Camera
Vogel H
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Prereq THE-105.
1.00 LFA
FIN EXP
THE-208-01
Games and Interactive Media
Abbott M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
LIB LGL
THE-208-01SR
Games and Interactive Media
Abbott M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Senior only section
1.00
LIB LGL
THE-215-01
The Classic Stage
Cherry J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
THE-215-01=ENG-310-02
1.00 LFA
FIN TGRR