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21/FA Course Faculty Days Comments/Requisites Credits Location Capacity Available Seats
ACC - ACCOUNTING
ACC-201-01
Financial Accounting
Hensley E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
TBA TBA
23
ACC-201-02
Financial Accounting
Foos J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
TBA TBA
23
ACC-301-01
Intermediate Accounting I
Hensley E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Prerequisite: ACC-202
1.00
TBA TBA
25 24 
ART - ART
ART-125-01
Drawing
Mohl J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
TBA TBA
12
ART-202-01
Art in Film
Morton E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
TBA TBA
30
ART-202-01F
Art in Film
Morton E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
TBA TBA
6
ART-225-01
Experimental Filmaking
Mohl D
TU TH
01:10PM - 03:00PM
This Art studio production course focuses on cinema's most popular style of storytelling: live-action narrative filmmaking. Students will study various techniques and important aspects associated with using moving images and sound to engage audiences and convey narratives. They will become familiar with basic hardware and software, space and screen direction, composition and orientation, shape within the frame, editing and transitions, camera position and movement, costumes, and location considerations. Along with readings and screenings, students will create short collaborative group projects, narrative film challenges, as well as have the opportunity to explore their own original narrative ideas.
1.00
TBA TBA
8
ART-225-02
Metalsmithing
Mohl J
TU TH
01:10PM - 03:55PM
This course introduces students to metal as a medium for artistic expression. Over the semester, we will learn basic techniques for the fabrication of metal objects and small-scale sculptures. Students will practice sawing, filing, sanding, riveting, hard (silver) soldering, and finishing pieces made of non-ferrous metals. Forming, texturing, and shaping metal will also be explored
1.00
TBA TBA
8
ART-225-03
Sculpture Experiments
Mohl J
F
01:10PM - 03:55PM
In this course students will create work based on a focused range of materials and topic-themed project prompts. Written documentation will also be emphasized, in order to better understand the development of ideas and the design decision-making process. Project media will range from the conceptual and ephemeral (light, shadow, time) to the traditional and tangible (stone, wood, metal) and to the contemporary (found objects, plastics and recyclables). This is an opportunity to explore numerous ideas.
1.00
TBA TBA
10
ART-228-01
Painting: Mixed Media
Mohl D
M W
01:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
12
ART-311-01
Aesthetics
Carlson M
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
ART-311-01=PHI-220-01 Prerequisite: one course in Art History (ART-101, ART-103, ART-104, ART-105, ART-207, ART-208, ART-209, ART-210, ART-311, or ART-312).
1.00
TBA TBA
20 17 
ART-312-01
Post Modern Art & Culture
Morton E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Prerequisite: One course in Art History.
1.00
TBA TBA
8
ART-331-01
Advanced Studio
Mohl D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisites: Two credits from ART-125, 126, 223, 224, 225, 227, 228, and 229. At least one credit from the 200 level.
1.00
TBA TBA
 
ART-433-01
Senior Studio
Mohl D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisites: ART-330 or 331.
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
 
ASI - ASIAN STUDIES
ASI-112-01
East Asian Popular Culture
Healey C
M F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
W
02:10PM - 04:00PM
This course considers the production, circulation, and consumption of East Asian popular culture as a global phenomenon. Topics include Japanese anime, Korean pop music, Chinese science fiction, Hong Kong martial arts cinema, etc. Special attention will be paid to new media forms and transnational networks of cultural exchange. All readings in English. Film screenings W 2:10-4:00. This course also counts as an elective for the minor in Film and Digital Media.
1.00
TBA TBA
16
ASI-112-01F
Studies in Asian Culture
Healey C
M F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
W
02:10PM - 04:00PM
This course considers the production, circulation, and consumption of East Asian popular culture as a global phenomenon. Topics include Japanese anime, Korean pop music, Chinese science fiction, Hong Kong martial arts cinema, etc. Special attention will be paid to new media forms and transnational networks of cultural exchange. All readings in English. Film screenings W 2:10-4:00. This course also counts as an elective for the minor in Film and Digital Media.
1.00
TBA TBA
4
ASI-196-01
Relig in Japanese Literature
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ASI-196-01=HUM-196-01=REL-196-01. 2nd half semester. For the 1st half semester at 9:45 TuTh, see REL-275. "Old pond--frog jumps in--sound of water." So runs the famous haiku by Basho. Is it religious? For the Japanese, yes. In Japan religion and art are arguably the same thing. In this course we'll ask how and why. We'll study Japanese ideas about art and religion (e.g. emptiness, solitude, "sublime beauty"), and how they appear in Japanese literature. We'll read selections from Japanese poetry (including haiku), Noh drama, a classic novel (The Tale of Genji), and some short stories.
0.50
TBA TBA
20 16 
ASI-204-01
Music: East Asian Cultures
Makubuya J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
MUS-204-01=ASI-204-01 The standard approach to this ASI 204-01/MUS 204-01 course this Fall '21 at Wabash College, is to start with an introductory survey and examination of a wide range and selection of traditional folk musical instruments affiliated with the East Asian cultures. The selected East Asian traditional folk instruments will be used to provide an introductory basis and examination for the study of their contextual as well as societal significance in the respective East Asian cultural societies. Beyond the instruments and their roles in producing musical sound, this course also examines the significant ceremonies, rites, and rituals enhanced by the folk music. In addition to the music, this class also serves as a forum for learning about the selected East Asian cultures as case studies. The selected cultures will include those from: China, India, Pakistan, Indonesia, Japan, Vietnam, Korea, Laos, Burma, Philippines, and Malaysia.
1.00
TBA TBA
15 10 
ASI-277-01
Int Gend Stu: Focus on E. Asia
Healey C
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
ASI-277-01=GEN-101-01=ASI-277-01F=GEN-101-01F Course Type: LFA/HPR/DR This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of gender studies by exploring questions about the meaning of gender in society with a special focus on East Asia. The course will familiarize students with the central issues, questions and debates in Gender Studies scholarship by analyzing themes of gendered performance and power in law, culture, education, work, health, social policy and the family. Key themes may include but are not limited to the relationship between sex and gender, the legal and social workings of the private / public distinction, the way that disciplinary practices code certain behaviors as masculine or feminine, the intersection of gender with race and ethnicity, the gendered structure of power, the tension between difference and equality, the production and circulation of gender expectations in the media, and the contested role of the law in achieving equality.
1.00
TBA TBA
16 13 
ASI-277-01F
Int Gend Stu: Focus on E. Asia
Healey C
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
ASI-277-01=GEN-101-01=ASI-277-01F=GEN-101-01F Course Type: LFA/HPR/DR This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of gender studies by exploring questions about the meaning of gender in society with a special focus on East Asia. The course will familiarize students with the central issues, questions and debates in Gender Studies scholarship by analyzing themes of gendered performance and power in law, culture, education, work, health, social policy and the family. Key themes may include but are not limited to the relationship between sex and gender, the legal and social workings of the private / public distinction, the way that disciplinary practices code certain behaviors as masculine or feminine, the intersection of gender with race and ethnicity, the gendered structure of power, the tension between difference and equality, the production and circulation of gender expectations in the media, and the contested role of the law in achieving equality.
1.00
TBA TBA
4
ASI-277-02
The Economics of Asia
Saha S
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
ASI-277-01=ECO-277-02 This is an introductory course on the economic development in East and South Asian Countries. The goal of this course is to explore the elements of emerging financial markets with a focus on the determinants and impact of capital flows, globalization, economic development, financing and financial crises. Several Asian economies experienced speedy economic growth in the last sixty to seventy years. After World War II, Japan was the first high-growth economy in Asia. And, it was quickly followed by a set of very diverse countries, for example, China, India, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore and Vietnam. China and India had sudden emergence onto the world stage as active traders, investors, and consumers. Common characteristics of these countries' growth success are macroeconomic stability, relatively less inequality and investment in people, export promotion, etc. This course focuses on the economic characteristics and the development strategies of these Asian economies to examine similarities and differences among them, how the Asian regions grew from an agricultural area into a newly-developed area, and how the institutional environment supported the economic growth. Finally, it is worth noting that growth has also levied a toll on these countries' environment and has led to the rapid degradation of their natural resources. The goal of this course is to explore the key components and features of the rapidly growing/grown East and Southeast Asian economies. This course analyzes the development strategies of the individual countries to help better understand the roles of the institutions that have contributed to and shaped development in these countries. Prerequisite: ECO-101
1.00
TBA TBA
25 24 
ASI-277-03
Philippines: His, Lit & Cult
Rogers D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ASI-277-03=SPA312-01=HSP-312-02 This brand-new course on the Philippines will connect Asian and Hispanic Studies for the first time in our curriculum. Taught in English and counting for credit both programs, as well as Spanish, we'll spend the semester learning everything we can about the Philippine archipelago from a deeply interdisciplinary perspective: History, Geography, Film, Art, Literature, Language, Food, and Religion. We'll pay particular attention to the effects of colonialism on the Philippines as we explore the consequences of first Spain, then Japan, and finally the United States' occupation of the islands.
1.00
TBA TBA
25 24 
ASI-400-01
Senior Capstone
Rogers D
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
 
BIO - BIOLOGY
BIO-101-01
Human Biology
Ingram A, Bost A
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: BIO-101L
1.00
TBA TBA
48
BIO-101L-01
Human Biology Lab
Staff
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-101
0.00
TBA TBA
16
BIO-101L-02
Human Biology Lab
Staff
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-101
0.00
TBA TBA
16
BIO-101L-03
Human Biology Lab
Staff
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-101
0.00
TBA TBA
16
BIO-111-01
General Biology I
Burton P, Walsh H, Wetzel E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Co-Requisite: BIO-111L
1.00
TBA TBA
80 68 
BIO-111L-01
General Biol I Lab
Walsh H
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-111
0.00
TBA TBA
20 19 
BIO-111L-02
General Biol I Lab
Burton P
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-111
0.00
TBA TBA
20 12 
BIO-111L-03
General Biol I Lab
Wetzel E
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-111
0.00
TBA TBA
20 19 
BIO-111L-04
General Biol I Lab
Wetzel E
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-111
0.00
TBA TBA
20 18 
BIO-211-01
Genetics
Sorensen-Kamakian E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prerequisite: BIO-112, Co-Requisite: BIO-211L
1.00
TBA TBA
40 10 
BIO-211L-01
Genetics Lab
Sorensen-Kamakian E
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-211, Prerequisite: BIO-112
0.00
TBA TBA
20 10 
BIO-211L-02
Genetics Lab
Sorensen-Kamakian E
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-211, Prerequisite: BIO-112
0.00
TBA TBA
20
BIO-213-01
Ecology
Carlson B
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prerequisite: BIO-112, Co-Requisite: BIO-213L
1.00
TBA TBA
32
BIO-213L-01
Ecology Lab
Carlson B
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-213, Prerequisite: BIO-112
0.00
TBA TBA
16
BIO-213L-02
Ecology Lab
Carlson B
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-213, Prerequisite: BIO-112
0.00
TBA TBA
16
BIO-314-01
Developmental Biology
Burton P
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
BIO-211, BIO-314L
1.00
TBA TBA
12
BIO-314L-01
Develop Biology Lab
Burton P
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-314.
0.00
TBA TBA
12
BIO-315-01
Organismal Physiology
Walsh H
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerquisite: BIO-212, BIO-315L
1.00
TBA TBA
12
BIO-315L-01
Organismal Physiology Lab
Walsh H
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-315.
0.00
TBA TBA
12
BIO-325-01
Microbiology
Bost A
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prerequisite: BIO-211, Co-Requisite: BIO-325L
1.00
TBA TBA
12
BIO-325L-01
Microbiology Lab
Bost A
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite BIO-325
0.00
TBA TBA
12
BIO-401-01
Senior Seminar
Sorensen-Kamakian E, Carlson B
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
1.00
TBA TBA
16
BLS - BLACK STUDIES
BLS-270-01
The Black Body
Lake T
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
BLS-270-01=ENG-370-01 The Black Body is a site of surveillance and violence. It is, also, used to depict both the sacred and profane. Moreover, the Black body signals the erotic and grotesque. How is this possible? We will review the history of sighting, picturing, describing and embodying Blackness. From James Van DerZee's photos of Black life and culture in 1930s Harlem, NY, to Kerry James Marshall's paintings, the goal is to read representations of Blackness as a possible way of understanding what it means to be human.
1.00
TBA TBA
25 24 
BLS-270-02
Black Movies and Films
Lake T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
BLS-270-02=ENG-260-01 We will survey the history of Black Movies and Films from Oscar Micheaux to Spike Lee to Jordan Peele. Additionally, some attention will also be given to Black TV shows. This course will introduce you to the period of Black protest films, Blaxploitation films, urban realism and speculative film. The political and social implication of visual representation, as well as, the financial aspects of the movie industry will be covered here. We will read films as texts with the goal of learning the meaning(s) of Black life in the modern world. Prerequisite: None
1.00
TBA TBA
20
BLS-270-03
And All That Jazz
Williams S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
BLS-270-03=MUS-104-01 This course will explore the history and methods of American Jazz. Students will study the musical genres, geographical issues, and social movements that led to the creation of jazz and the development of the genre into present day. Major composers, arrangers, band leaders, and performers will be studied. As much of this music was derived from the combination of white and black experiences, racial issues associated with the arts and artistic creation will also be studied and discussed. The course will include a creative component where students will choose to write lyrics, compose music, and/or perform some jazz themselves. No prior musical experience is required to have a great time learning about jazz in American heritage!
1.00
TBA TBA
20 14 
BLS-270-04
Politics of Civil Rights Mvmt
Gelbman S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PSC-214-01=HIS-240-01=BLS-270-04. Instructor permission required.
1.00
TBA TBA
9
BLS-270-05
Ed Pol: Sch to Prison Pipeline
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
BLS-270-05=EDU-230-01 In this course, we will examine the ways in which the U.S. system of P-12 public education has become increasingly enmeshed with the criminal justice system. As the ACLU has noted, school disciplinary measures have become more rigid and more likely to divert students toward local law enforcement agencies. Beyond the area of school conduct issues, inequities that predict students' success in our testing-focused educational system may also predict students' likelihood of engagement with law enforcement (eg: family income and educational levels, presence/absence of learning exceptionalities, stereotyping based upon personal and/or cultural identity, and wealth/poverty levels of schools and neighborhoods). In this class, we will examine the underlying policies and school-level practices that contribute to this destructive pattern, along with interventions that have been developed, such as greater attention to students' educational and vocational needs, restorative justice approaches to behavioral issues, and a focus on social-emotional learning.
1.00
TBA TBA
18 13 
BLS-270-06
Soc Stud Ed for Democratic Cit
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
BLS-270-06=EDU-250-01
1.00
TBA TBA
18 17 
BLS-270-07
Civil Rights the Black Arts
Vogel H
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
THE-103-01=BLS-270-07=HIS-240-02. Instructor permission required. The 1950s and 60s saw the emergence of two sociopolitical movements: the mostly rural-based Civil Rights Movement, and the mostly urban-centered Black Arts Movement. In this course, we will examine Black theatrical contributions to the movements: witnessing the sanctioning of violence on Black citizens and the representation of Black life and community. In 1955, the funeral of Emmett Till ignited wide-spread activism and James Baldwin's THE AMEN CORNER premiered at Howard University. In 1959, Lorraine Hansberry's A RAISIN IN THE SUN was the first play written, directed, and performed by Black theater artists on Broadway; and paralleled the news coverage of the Greensboro, South Carolina lunch counter sit-ins, as well as simultaneous sit-ins across the South. In the 1960s, Black-run theatres such as the New Lafayette in Harlem, the Negro Ensemble Company, and the Free Southern Theater produced playwrights Amiri Baraka, Ed Bullins, Ron Milner, Sonia Sanchez, Adrienne Kennedy, Alice Childress, Douglas Turner Ward and Joseph A. Walker, who were writing in a new Black idiom. In these plays of the Black Arts Movement, the protests and violence of the era are confronted on the stage, both in dialogue and action, melding the spheres of public and dramatic performance
1.00
TBA TBA
9
BLS-300-01
African Cinema
Pouille A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
BLS-300-01=FRE-377-01=ENG-270-01 This course will study the evolution of African cinema since 1950. Traditionally dominated by the celluloid film, known for its sobering representations of Africa, the African cinematic landscape has recently witnessed the rise of the video film, generally characterized by a more aggrandizing portrayal of local cultures and communities. While analyzing the generic differences between these two types of films, we will also examine their appeal among African and international audiences. Furthermore, we will consider and reflect on the nexus points between African orality especially African myths and legends, and several contemporary issues among which immigration, globalization, gender relations, identity formation and modernity. Our primary resources will be films produced by acclaimed directors hailing from Cameroon, Senegal, Burkina Faso, Morocco, Egypt, Mali, Nigeria, South Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo. This course will be offered in English, however French students will submit all writing assignments in French.
1.00
TBA TBA
15 14 
BLS-300-02
Colonial & Postcolonial Ed
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
BLS-300-02=EDU-372-01
1.00
TBA TBA
10 10 
BUS - BUSINESS
BUS-400-01
Senior Capstone
Howland F, Koppelmann Z
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
 
CHE - CHEMISTRY
CHE-101-01
Survey of Chemistry
Novak W, Cook T
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Co-Requisite: CHE-101L
1.00
TBA TBA
60
CHE-101L-01
Survey Chemistry Lab
Schmitt P
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-101
0.00
TBA TBA
20
CHE-101L-02
Survey Chemistry Lab
Cook T
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-101
0.00
TBA TBA
20
CHE-101L-03
Survey Chemistry Lab
Cook T
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-101
0.00
TBA TBA
20
CHE-111-01
General Chemistry I
Novak W, Taylor A
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111L
1.00
TBA TBA
36
CHE-111-01F
General Chemistry I
Porter L
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111L
1.00
TBA TBA
24 24 
CHE-111L-01
General Chemistry Lab
Novak W
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111
0.00
TBA TBA
8 -1 
CHE-111L-01F
General Chemistry Lab
Novak W
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111
0.00
TBA TBA
7
CHE-111L-02
General Chemistry Lab
Porter L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111
0.00
TBA TBA
8
CHE-111L-02F
General Chemistry Lab
Porter L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111
0.00
TBA TBA
8
CHE-111L-03
General Chemistry Lab
Novak W
TH
08:00AM - 11:00AM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111
0.00
TBA TBA
16
CHE-111L-04
General Chemistry Lab
Porter L
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111
0.00
TBA TBA
8
CHE-111L-04F
General Chemistry Lab
Porter L
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111
0.00
TBA TBA
8
CHE-221-01
Organic Chemistry I
Wysocki L, Cook T
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: CHE-111, Co-Requisite: CHE-221L
1.00
TBA TBA
48 11 
CHE-221L-01
Organic Chem I Lab
Wysocki L
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-221, Prerequisite: CHE-111
0.00
TBA TBA
16
CHE-221L-02
Organic Chem I Lab
Wysocki L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-221, Prerequisite: CHE-111
0.00
TBA TBA
16
CHE-221L-03
Organic Chem I Lab
Wysocki L
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-221, Prerequisite: CHE-111
0.00
TBA TBA
16
CHE-351-01
Physical Chemistry
Schmitt P
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisites: CHE-241 and MAT-112, Co-Requisite: CHE-351L
1.00
TBA TBA
15 11 
CHE-351L-01
Physical Chem I Lab
Schmitt P
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-351, Prerequisites: CHE-241 and MAT-112
0.00
TBA TBA
15 11 
CHE-461-01
Biochemistry of Covid-19
Taylor A
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
This half semester course will focus on how Covid-19 "works" on a biochemical level, including how it enters cells, interacts with normal cellular processes, and elicits immune responses, as well as the biochemistry of vaccines and potential treatments. Prerequisites: CHE-361
0.50
TBA TBA
15
CHE-462-01
Advanced Biochemistry
Taylor A
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Prerequisite: CHE-361
0.50
TBA TBA
15
CHE-471-01
Materials Chemistry & Nanosci.
Porter L
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Materials chemistry is a dynamic research field that has steered the evolution of civilization and continues to impact our daily lives. Ceramics, polymers, semiconductors, superconductors, alloys, nanoparticles, and composites are the materials of choice for a host of applications ranging from building materials and advanced microelectronics to food packaging and medical implants. In order to develop or select the proper material for a certain application, scientists and engineers must understand the structure of various materials at the microscopic level. This is because macroscopic properties (density, chemical resistance, color, biocompatibility, etc.) are dictated by chemical structure. Today's chemists, engineers, physicists, and biologists are working diligently to develop exotic new materials to enable the revolutionary technologies of the future. This course will present a survey of the field and explore its frontiers (e.g. nanoscience) via the primary literature. This one-half credit course meets twice each week for the second half of the semester. Prerequsite: CHE-321
0.50
TBA TBA
14
CHE-491-01
Integrative Topic in Chemistry
Porter L
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Advanced Structure, Bonding, & Spectroscopy of Inorganic Compounds This senior capstone course will challenge students with an application of fundamental group theory principles to structure, bonding, and vibrational spectroscopy. Group theory provides a powerful analytical tool for determining how molecular symmetry dictates infrared/Raman spectra and molecular orbital descriptions of chemical bonding. Although the primary focus will include inorganic substances, this course will build upon concepts established in previous coursework from across many subdisciplines of chemistry. In-depth exploration will connect overarching themes in the major and provide a powerful launching point for written comprehensive exam preparation. Critical engagement with the primary literature, small-group problem solving, and diverse modes of oral and written presentation will be emphasized. This one-half credit course is required of all chemistry majors and meets twice each week for the first half of the semester. Prerequsite: CHE-331 or CHE-351, or instructor permission.
0.50
TBA TBA
14
CHI - CHINESE
CHI-101-01
Elementary Chinese I
Li Y
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101L
1.00
TBA TBA
12
CHI-101-01F
Elementary Chinese I
Li Y
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101L
1.00
TBA TBA
4
CHI-101L-01
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
M
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101
0.00
TBA TBA
4
CHI-101L-02
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101
0.00
TBA TBA
4
CHI-101L-03
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
TU
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101
0.00
TBA TBA
4
CHI-101L-04
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101
0.00
TBA TBA
4
CHI-201-01
Intermediate Chinese I
Healey C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: CHI-102, or CHI-201 placement., Co-requisite: CHI-201L
1.00
TBA TBA
12
CHI-201L-01
Intermediate Chinese I Lab
Staff
W
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Co-requisite: CHI-201, Prerequisite: CHI-102, or CHI-201 placement
0.00
TBA TBA
4
CHI-201L-02
Intermediate Chinese I Lab
Staff
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-requisite: CHI-201, Prerequisite: CHI-102, or CHI-201 placement
0.00
TBA TBA
4
CHI-201L-03
Intermediate Chinese I Lab
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Co-requisite: CHI-201, Prerequisite: CHI-102, or CHI-201 placement
0.00
TBA TBA
4
CHI-301-01
Conversation & Composition
Li Y
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prerequisite: CHI-202, or CHI-301 placement.
1.00
TBA TBA
5
CLA - CLASSICS
CLA-105-01
Ancient Greece
Wickkiser B
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
CLA-105-01=HIS-211-01=CLA-105-01F=HIS-211-01F
1.00
TBA TBA
25
CLA-105-01F
Ancient Greece
Wickkiser B
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
CLA-105-01=HIS-211-01=CLA-105-01F=HIS-211-01F
1.00
TBA TBA
15 15 
CLA-213-01
The Art of Power
Hartnett J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CLA-213-01=HIS-210-02=CLA-213-01F=HIS-210-02F Immense power rested in the hands of Rome's emperors. And while their peccadillos tend to dominate our imaginations today, in antiquity emperors' public images were carefully curated in a way that would make Madison Avenue ad agencies proud. Key in this endeavor was the deployment of artwork and building projects, which ranged from musclebound portraits and gilded building complexes to infrastructure that we might initially consider mundane, such as aqueducts and sewers. This course travels back in time to investigate the strategies that the imperial court used to claim, justify, and maintain its power within the city of Rome itself. To that end, part of our consideration will revolve around the monuments' multiple audiences - rivals to power, traditionalists, and a cosmopolitan population drawn from every corner of the empire. Presentations, quizzes, and a final project form the backbone of evaluation for the course.
1.00
TBA TBA
18
CLA-213-01F
The Art of Power
Hartnett J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CLA-213-01=HIS-210-02=CLA-213-01F=HIS-210-02F Immense power rested in the hands of Rome's emperors. And while their peccadillos tend to dominate our imaginations today, in antiquity emperors' public images were carefully curated in a way that would make Madison Avenue ad agencies proud. Key in this endeavor was the deployment of artwork and building projects, which ranged from musclebound portraits and gilded building complexes to infrastructure that we might initially consider mundane, such as aqueducts and sewers. This course travels back in time to investigate the strategies that the imperial court used to claim, justify, and maintain its power within the city of Rome itself. To that end, part of our consideration will revolve around the monuments' multiple audiences - rivals to power, traditionalists, and a cosmopolitan population drawn from every corner of the empire. Presentations, quizzes, and a final project form the backbone of evaluation for the course.
1.00
TBA TBA
7
CLA-240-01
Ancient Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CLA-240-01=PHI-240-01=CLA-240-01F=PHI-240-01F
1.00
TBA TBA
27 20 
CLA-240-01F
Ancient Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CLA-240-01=PHI-240-01=CLA-240-01F=PHI-240-01F
1.00
TBA TBA
4
COL - COLLOQUIUM
COL-401-01
Important Books
Howland F, Blix D
W
07:30PM - 09:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
15
CSC - COMPUTER SCIENCE
CSC-101-01
Intro to Computer Science
McKinney C
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
8
CSC-101-01F
Intro to Computer Science
McKinney C
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
16 16 
CSC-111-01
Intro to Programming
Turner W
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequisite: CSC-101, CSC-106, or MAT 112; or permission of the instructor.
1.00
TBA TBA
30 19 
CSC-241-01
Intro to Machine Organization
McKinney C
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Prerequisite: CSC-111 with a minimum grade of C-.
1.00
TBA TBA
24 -1 
CSC-244-01
Theory of Computing
McCartin-Lim M
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Prerequisite: CSC-111 with a minimum grade of C-; either MAT-108 or MAT-219 with a minimum grade of C-
1.00
TBA TBA
24 13 
CSC-271-01
Intro to Data Science
Westphal C
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
This course examines key elements of the data-to-knowledge pipeline: gathering data from reliable sources; cleaning, processing and visualizing data; analyzing data with appropriate statistical tools; and making informed decisions. Using a variety of computational and statistical tools, students will develop practical data science skills in a collaborative, project-based environment. We will use the programming languages Python and R, though only proficiency in Python is a prerequisite. There is no mathematics prerequisite for this course. Students who have completed MAT 223 should consider CSC/MAT 338. PreReq CSC-111 or permission of the instructor.
1.00
TBA TBA
20
CSC-338-01
Topics in Computational Math
McCartin-Lim M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CSC-338-01=MAT-338-01 Machine Learning: How does Alexa recognize your speech? How does Gmail filter spam from your inbox? How does Facebook identify you in photographs? How does Netflix recommend what movies you should watch? How does 23andMe link genetic factors to diseases? How does DeepMind develop artificial intelligence programs that can beat world champions in Chess and Go? Algorithms that automatically transform data into intelligent decision-making processes are now ubiquitous in society. The convergence of "big data" with massively parallel computational hardware has led to a renaissance in the exciting world of machine learning. This course will be an introduction to the theory and practice of machine learning. We will develop the foundations of machine learning, guided by principles such as Occam's razor and in consideration of hinderances such as the dreaded "curse of dimensionality". We will explore training and evaluation frameworks. We will look at a variety of tasks including classification, regression, clustering and reinforcement learning. We will learn about models such as decision trees, Bayesian learning, neural networks and deep learning. Prerequsites for this offering are CSC-111 and MAT-223 with a C- or greater. Prerequisites: CSC-111 and MAT-223 with a minimum grade of C-.
1.00
TBA TBA
24 21 
CSC-400-01
Senior Capstone
McCartin-Lim M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Prerequisite: CSC-211 with a minimum grade of C-
1.00
TBA TBA
24 17 
DV1 - DIVISION I
DV1-277-01
Chemistry of Wine
Schmitt P
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
F
02:10PM - 03:50PM
This course will explore the chemistry and technology of modern wine making. Primary literature and a wine chemistry text (Understanding Wine Chemistry, Waterhouse et al.) will form the core material for the course, with representative wine parings chosen to accompany each topic. The course will combine elements of organic chemistry, biochemistry, and analytical chemistry together with a basic study of geography, history, culture, and tasting protocols necessary in any form of wine education. In more detail, the course will explore i) how the chemical components of grapes and wine (sugars, alcohol, phenols, esters, among many others) are influenced by terroir, climate, fermentation, etc. ii) the structure/ properties of these compounds and how they are measured and quantified, and iii) how these compounds impact the taste, aroma, mouthfeel, longevity, and value of wine. Each example wine would be tasted in the context of identifying these specific chemical characteristics, also (briefly) discussing the geographic and cultural origins of each particular example.
1.00
TBA TBA
12
DV1-277-02
Intro to Epidemiology
Wetzel E, Hodges T
M
02:10PM - 03:50PM
W
02:10PM - 03:00PM
DV1-277-02=GHL-277-01. Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations, and the application of this study to the control of health problems (M. Porta, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 5thed. 2008). This course will introduce you to basic epidemiologic concepts including determinants of health and patterns of disease in populations, population health descriptive techniques, use of health indicators and secondary data sources. You will gain an understanding of the role of Epidemiology in developing prevention strategies and policy. Among the topics to be covered are measures of mortality and morbidity, design and analysis of observational studies, community health assessment and program evaluation. Using well-studied case studies, you will learn from one another through selection and presentation of recent public health topics, and discussion of epidemiological principles applied to their study.
1.00
TBA TBA
16 16 
DV3 - DIVISION III
DV3-252-01
Stats Soc Sciences
Byun C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
25
DV3-252-02
Stats Soc Sciences
Byun C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
25 16 
ECO - ECONOMICS
ECO-101-01
Principles of Economics
Burnette J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
30 21 
ECO-101-02
Principles of Economics
Saha S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
30
ECO-101-03
Principles of Economics
Howland F
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
30 19 
ECO-101-04
Principles of Economics
Snow N
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
30
ECO-224-01
Econom & Political Development
Burnette J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
ECO-224-01=PPE-264-01=GHL-224 01 Prerequisite: ECO-101
1.00
TBA TBA
24 15 
ECO-235-01
Health Economics
Howland F
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
ECO-235-01=GHL-235-01=PPE-255-01 PreReq ECO-101
1.00
TBA TBA
25 20 
ECO-251-01
Economic Approach With Excel
Byun C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: ECO-101
0.50
TBA TBA
25
ECO-251-02
Economic Approach With Excel
Byun C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisite: ECO-101
0.50
TBA TBA
25 10 
ECO-277-01
Economics of Latin America
Mikek P
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
ECO-277-01=HSP-277-01 The course includes a variety of topics focusing on current economic policies and institutional arrangements in Latin American countries, such as monetary policy, exchange rate regimes, international debt policies, challenges of growth and development (including natural resources), and demographic developments (including cultural, ethnic, and racial diversity, and economic inequality).The main goal of this class is to develop a deeper understanding of the economic structure and policies of a number of Latin American countries with particular emphasis on their international economic relations. Additionally, the class will help students to become familiar with some data sources for information on Latin America. Finally, economic policy is done in the cultural, historical and social context of individual countries, therefore some of this context will be included in class. The class will include a substantial number of case studies of particular economic issues in particular countries (examples may include exchange rate crisis in Argentina, international debt crisis in Mexico, successful economic growth in Chile, dollarization in Ecuador, prospects of economic transition in Cuba etc.). Prerequisite: ECO-101
1.00
TBA TBA
30 21 
ECO-277-02
The Economics of Asia
Saha S
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
ECO-277-02=ASI-277-02 This is an introductory course on the economic development in East and South Asian Countries. The goal of this course is to explore the elements of emerging financial markets with a focus on the determinants and impact of capital flows, globalization, economic development, financing and financial crises. Several Asian economies experienced speedy economic growth in the last sixty to seventy years. After World War II, Japan was the first high-growth economy in Asia. And, it was quickly followed by a set of very diverse countries, for example, China, India, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore and Vietnam. China and India had sudden emergence onto the world stage as active traders, investors, and consumers. Common characteristics of these countries' growth success are macroeconomic stability, relatively less inequality and investment in people, export promotion, etc. This course focuses on the economic characteristics and the development strategies of these Asian economies to examine similarities and differences among them, how the Asian regions grew from an agricultural area into a newly-developed area, and how the institutional environment supported the economic growth. Finally, it is worth noting that growth has also levied a toll on these countries' environment and has led to the rapid degradation of their natural resources. The goal of this course is to explore the key components and features of the rapidly growing/grown East and Southeast Asian economies. This course analyzes the development strategies of the individual countries to help better understand the roles of the institutions that have contributed to and shaped development in these countries. Prerequisite: ECO-101
1.00
TBA TBA
25 10 
ECO-277-03
Behavioral Economics
Dunaway E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Behavioral Economics, a relatively new field in economic theory, attempts to bridge the divide between the classical microeconomic model and what we observe in the real world. In this class, we will explore concepts like mental accounting (or why my bank account never seems to have as much money in it as I remember), hyperbolic discounting (or why I keep hitting the snooze button on my alarm clock), reciprocity (or why I charge less to people I know better), and prospect theory (or why I weigh my fear of getting a C on an exam much more than my joy of getting an A on it), among other topics. ECO-277-03=PPE-258-01 Prerequisite: ECO-101
1.00
TBA TBA
25
ECO-277-04
Topics in Eco-Coffee
Mikek P
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: ECO-101
1.00
TBA TBA
2
ECO-291-01
Intermediate Micro Theory
Dunaway E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prerequisites: ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C-, and MAT-110 or 111 with a minimum grade of C-.
1.00
TBA TBA
30
ECO-292-01
Intermediate Macro
Mikek P
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisites: ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C-, and MAT-110 or 111 with a minimum grade of C-.
1.00
TBA TBA
30 15 
ECO-361-01
Corporate Finance
Howland F
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequisites: ECO-251, ECO-253, and ECO-291
1.00
TBA TBA
30
ECO-362-01
Money and Banking
Mikek P
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Prerequisites: ECO-253 with a minimum grade of C-, and ECO-292 with a minimum grade of C-.
1.00
TBA TBA
30 11 
ECO-401-01
Senior Seminar
Saha S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisite: ECO-251, A minimum grade of C- in ECO-253, ECO-291, and ECO-292
1.00
TBA TBA
12
ECO-401-02
Senior Seminar
Byun C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisite: ECO-251, A minimum grade of C- in ECO-253, ECO-291, and ECO-292
1.00
TBA TBA
11 -1 
EDU - EDUCATION
EDU-101-01
Intro Child & Adolescent Devel
Pittard M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
TBA TBA
13
EDU-101-01F
Intro Child & Adolescent Devel
Pittard M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
TBA TBA
5
EDU-203-01
Adolescent Literacy Developmnt
Pittard M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
TBA TBA
13
EDU-203-01F
Adolescent Literacy Developmnt
Pittard M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
TBA TBA
5
EDU-230-01
Ed Pol: Sch to Prison Pipeline
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
EDU-230-01=BLS-270-05 In this course, we will examine the ways in which the U.S. system of P-12 public education has become increasingly enmeshed with the criminal justice system. As the ACLU has noted, school disciplinary measures have become more rigid and more likely to divert students toward local law enforcement agencies. Beyond the area of school conduct issues, inequities that predict students' success in our testing-focused educational system may also predict students' likelihood of engagement with law enforcement (eg: family income and educational levels, presence/absence of learning exceptionalities, stereotyping based upon personal and/or cultural identity, and wealth/poverty levels of schools and neighborhoods). In this class, we will examine the underlying policies and school-level practices that contribute to this destructive pattern, along with interventions that have been developed, such as greater attention to students' educational and vocational needs, restorative justice approaches to behavioral issues, and a focus on social-emotional learning.
1.00
TBA TBA
18
EDU-250-01
Soc Stud Ed for Democratic Cit
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
EDU-250-01=BLS-270-06
1.00
TBA TBA
18 15 
EDU-372-01
Colonial & Postcolonial Ed
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
EDU-372-01=BLS-300-02
1.00
TBA TBA
10
ENG - ENGLISH
ENG-101-01F
Composition
Benedicks C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
15 15 
ENG-101-02F
Composition
Pavlinich E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
TBA TBA
15 14 
ENG-101-03F
Composition
Brewer A
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
15 15 
ENG-101-04F
Composition
Whitney J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
15 15 
ENG-105-01
Intro to Poetry
Whitney J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
30 18 
ENG-106-01
Intro to Short Fiction
Whitney J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
30 19 
ENG-110-01
Intro to Creative Writing
Mong D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
13
ENG-110-01F
Intro to Creative Writing
Mong D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
7
ENG-212-01
Intermediate Poetry
Mong D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Eng-110
1.00
TBA TBA
20 15 
ENG-216-01
Intro to Shakespeare
Benedicks C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
ENG-216-01=THE-303-01
1.00
TBA TBA
30 16 
ENG-218-01
Engl Lit 1800-1900
Whitney J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
TBA TBA
20
ENG-260-01
Black Movies & Films
Lake T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ENG-260-01=BLS-270-02 We will survey the history of Black Movies and Films from Oscar Micheaux to Spike Lee to Jordan Peele. Additionally, some attention will also be given to Black TV shows. This course will introduce you to the period of Black protest films, Blaxploitation films, urban realism and speculative film. The political and social implication of visual representation, as well as, the financial aspects of the movie industry will be covered here. We will read films as texts with the goal of learning the meaning(s) of Black life in the modern world. Prerequisite: None
1.00
TBA TBA
20 12 
ENG-270-01
African Cinema
Pouille A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ENG-270-01=FRE-377-01=BLS-300-01 This course will study the evolution of African cinema since 1950. Traditionally dominated by the celluloid film, known for its sobering representations of Africa, the African cinematic landscape has recently witnessed the rise of the video film, generally characterized by a more aggrandizing portrayal of local cultures and communities. While analyzing the generic differences between these two types of films, we will also examine their appeal among African and international audiences. Furthermore, we will consider and reflect on the nexus points between African orality especially African myths and legends, and several contemporary issues among which immigration, globalization, gender relations, identity formation and modernity. Our primary resources will be films produced by acclaimed directors hailing from Cameroon, Senegal, Burkina Faso, Morocco, Egypt, Mali, Nigeria, South Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo. This course will be offered in English, however French students will submit all writing assignments in French.
1.00
TBA TBA
15 13 
ENG-297-01
Intro to the Study of Lit
Brewer A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
20 11 
ENG-310-01
The Modern Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ENG-310-01=THE-216-01
1.00
TBA TBA
15 12 
ENG-311-01
Adv Wrkshp in Crea. Nonfiction
Brewer A
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequiste: ENG-211 or Instructor consent. ENG-211
1.00
TBA TBA
15 12 
ENG-314-01
Theory and Practice of Peer Tu
Koppelmann Z
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Prerequisite: FRT-101 Freshman Tutorial and FRC-101 Enduring Questions
1.00
TBA TBA
10 10 
ENG-370-01
The Black Body
Lake T
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
ENG-370-01=BLS-270-01 The Black Body is a site of surveillance and violence. It is, also, used to depict both the sacred and profane. Moreover, the Black body signals the erotic and grotesque. How is this possible? We will review the history of sighting, picturing, describing and embodying Blackness. From James Van DerZee's photos of Black life and culture in 1930s Harlem, NY, to Kerry James Marshall's paintings, the goal is to read representations of Blackness as a possible way of understanding what it means to be human. Prerequisite: 1 course credit from ENG at Wabash
1.00
TBA TBA
25 23 
ENG-411-01
Bus & Tech Writing
Pavlinich E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequisite: FRC-101 Enduring Questions, and junior or senior standing
1.00
TBA TBA
20
ENG-497-01
Seminar in English Lit
Lamberton J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
TBA TBA
20 13 
ENG-498-01
Capstone Portfolio
Mong D
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Senior English Creative Writing Majors Only
0.50
TBA TBA
15 11 
FRE - FRENCH
FRE-101-01
Elementary French I
Quandt K
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Co-requisite: FRE-101L
1.00
TBA TBA
20
FRE-101L-01
Elementary French 1 Lab
Staff
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-101
0.00
TBA TBA
5
FRE-101L-02
Elementary French 1 Lab
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-requisite: FRE-101
0.00
TBA TBA
5
FRE-101L-03
Elementary French 1 Lab
Staff
TU
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-101
0.00
TBA TBA
5
FRE-101L-04
Elementary French 1 Lab
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-requisite: FRE-101
0.00
TBA TBA
5
FRE-201-01
Intermediate French
Quandt K
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Prerequisite: FRE-102, or FRE-201 placement, Co-requisite: FRE-201L
1.00
TBA TBA
20 15 
FRE-201L-01
Intermediate French Lab.
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-201
0.00
TBA TBA
5
FRE-201L-02
Intermediate French Lab.
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-requisite: FRE-201
0.00
TBA TBA
5
FRE-201L-03
Intermediate French Lab.
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-201
0.00
TBA TBA
5
FRE-201L-04
Intermediate French Lab.
Staff
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-201
0.00
TBA TBA
5
FRE-277-01
Language and Literature
Quandt K
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
FRE-201
1.00
TBA TBA
10
FRE-301-01
Conversation & Composition
Pouille A
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisite: FRE-202, or FRE-301 placement
1.00
TBA TBA
8
FRE-377-01
African Cinema
Pouille A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FRE-377-01=BLS-300-01=ENG-270-01 This course will study the evolution of African cinema since 1950. Traditionally dominated by the celluloid film, known for its sobering representations of Africa, the African cinematic landscape has recently witnessed the rise of the video film, generally characterized by a more aggrandizing portrayal of local cultures and communities. While analyzing the generic differences between these two types of films, we will also examine their appeal among African and international audiences. Furthermore, we will consider and reflect on the nexus points between African orality especially African myths and legends, and several contemporary issues among which immigration, globalization, gender relations, identity formation and modernity. Our primary resources will be films produced by acclaimed directors hailing from Cameroon, Senegal, Burkina Faso, Morocco, Egypt, Mali, Nigeria, South Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo. This course will be offered in English, however French students will submit all writing assignments in French.
1.00
TBA TBA
15 10 
FRT - FRESHMAN TUTORIALS
FRT-101-00
Freshman Tutorial
Beck, J, Lindsay E, Vogler L, McKinney C
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
This is a placeholder section until new sections are added.
1.00
TBA TBA
16 16 
FRT-101-01
A Nation of Scofflaws
Snow N
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
A Nation of Scofflaws: Narratives of Prohibition On January 16th 1920, the 18th Amendment to the United States Constitution was officially ratified, making the sale, manufacture, and transportation of intoxicating beverages illegal. America had begun, what President Herbert Hoover referred to as, "the Noble Experiment". While this experiment in alcohol prohibition may have been noble in its intentions it also helped earn the 1920s the nickname "the Lawless Decade." As many law-abiding citizens became criminals either by becoming scofflaws (a term coined in the 1920s for someone who drinks illegally) or worse: bootleggers and rumrunners. This tutorial will use stories from America's "Noble Experiment" to show how analytical narratives can be used to help illuminate the social sciences.
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-02
Swords, Sorcery, and Reality
Morillo S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Swords, Sorcery, and Reality: "Medieval" Warfare in Fantasy Literature and History This tutorial will explore the wars depicted in a variety of classic and contemporary fantasy literature with the reality of the medieval European warfare on which the fantasy conflict is based. Which fantasy authors "get it right"? Does getting it right matter? We will explore the topic through a variety of literature readings, plus selected scenes from movie and TV versions of fantasy combat (Tolkien, Game of Thrones, etc.), in comparison with primary sources for medieval warfare in Europe and beyond. The tutorial will encourage a full immersion in the topic by including board-game simulations of fantasy and real warfare. Pit your wizard against William the Conqueror!
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-03
History and Cinema
Rhoades M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
History and Cinema Students in this tutorial will explore the relationship between film and history. Naturally, we can view history in motion pictures as a backdrop to the story or actions of the main characters. This is useful for general educational purposes (WWII happened) but what if that history is wrong? When the past is altered and a film becomes very popular, we can still learn a good deal about the society that viewed that film. Choices made by documentary filmmakers can offer interpretations of the past that are incomplete but valuable for understanding viewers' perspectives. Students in this tutorial will read about 20th century European history, view films, and discuss how well the films represent the past. Motion pictures and documentaries screened in the course will address the Holocaust, Weimar Germany, WWI, and WWII. Films screened for class may include "Inglorious Bastards," "The Sorrow and the Pity," "Night and Fog," "Sophie Scholl," "Casablanca," "All Quiet on the Western Front," "Life and Nothing But," "Joyeux Noël," "The Officer's Ward," "Paths of Glory," "Behind the Lines," or "Dawn Patrol." All films will be shown during class time with discussion to follow.
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-04
It's About Time
Krause D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
It's About Time: An Exploration of Our Modern Understanding of Time Join us in an investigation of the nature of time. We will probe questions such as: Is time absolute or relative? Is time warped by gravity? Why does time appear to only go in one direction? Is time travel possible? Was there a beginning of time? Will there be an ending? How do humans perceive time? Why does time appear to drag when we're bored, but speed up when we're not? How is the nature of time portrayed in fiction and film? If you are intrigued by the movie Interstellar, this tutorial is for you!
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-05
Homer's Iliad: Heroes & Gods
Gorey M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Homer's Iliad: Heroes and Gods What makes a hero? For thousands of years, epic poetry provided a vehicle for ancient societies to explore essential human questions, such as the nature of heroism, the obligations of individuals to their communities, and the balance between free will and fate. Over the course of the semester, we will read Homer's Iliad, the oldest epic poem from Ancient Greece and one of the most famous literary depictions of warfare ever recorded. As we follow the trials and tribulations of the Greeks and Trojans in their ninth year at war, we will grapple with questions of honor, justice, gender, and memory that continue to reverberate in modern literature and culture.
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-06
Curses and Quests
Pavlinich E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Curses and Quests Once upon a time a group of Wabash scholars set upon a treacherous path to seek the origins of some of the most enduring popular narratives. To guide our discussions and research, we'll be revisiting some of the classic stories you might have grown up with, as well as lore and legend from other cultures and time periods. Don't be surprised if the tales you once treasured are rendered uncanny by our survey: morals will become quagmires, naïvette will be tempered by horrors. Beware: these aren't your Grandparents' folk tales.
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-07
Dance and Culture
Monsalve M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
"Dance, Dance, Otherwise We Are Lost": Dance and Culture This quote by acclaimed German dancer and choreographer Pina Bausch will frame our freshman tutorial based on the subject of dance. Universally performed but shaped by culture, the movement of the human body is linked to ancient ways of communication and it is still a vehicle for expressing social and cultural information. To dance is to create a human bond with another human being, with a community, and with yourself. This course will explore the role that dance has in our societies and cultures from numerous perspectives in the disciplines of history, psychology, sociology, anthropology, chemistry, physics, and the arts. This course will also serve as an introduction to scholarly work through the practice of written and oral communication that enhances critical thinking, academic research, and the use of campus resources.
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-08
Water As the New Oil
Bost A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Water as the New Oil: How Differential Water Access Impacts Public Health and the Pursuit of Happiness In 2019 the World Health Organization reported that 1 out of 3 people globally lack safe drinking water. How did this disparity of Water Haves and Have Nots come to be? How is water access changing with climate change? What are the impacts on human health, community, and commerce for diverse populations? How can you make a difference? In our tutorial, we will contemplate the intricate historical and modern linkages between water access and human wellbeing. Using case studies, we will apply multiple liberal arts lenses to consider how best to address water-related global (including local) crises. What does it mean to think critically, lead effectively, act responsibly, and live humanely in an inequitable world? Come share your thoughts
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-09
Museums
Morton E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Museums Have you ever been to a museum? In this course, we are going to look at all kinds of museums including natural history museums, sports history museums, state museums, children's museums, art museums, and more. We will look at what defines a museum, how museums serve the public, how museums collect, how museums educate, how museums create exhibitions, and what goes on behind the scenes. We will visit local museums and hopefully make a few field trips as well. You'll never look at a museum the same way again!
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-10
Science and Pseudoscience
Gunther K
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Science and Pseudoscience What is science? What is pseudoscience? How do we know? One of Wabash's core missions is to learn how to think critically. Is global warming real? Is AIDS real? Do vaccines cause autism? Can astrology determine our personalities and futures? How can we test these claims? What should we consider to be good evidence? We will examine these issues and more.
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-11
Rocket Science
McKinney C
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Rocket Science In this course, we will explore rocketry: mathematics and science, history, ethics, and politics. We will study the work and impact of important figures in the history, including early conceptual work by Tsiolkovsky and Moore, to initial rocket development by Goddard and von Braun, to the height of the Soviet and American space program under Korolev and von Braun. We'll study less visible "hidden figures" of the American program, specifically the largely female computational staff with NASA who pushed the boundaries of mathematics and physics while being simultaneously oppressed in the Jim Crow south. We'll discuss ethical questions, such as how to interpret the legacy of von Braun given that much of his early work was part of the Nazi war machine. We'll also build and launch our own rockets, analyze their flights, and conduct virtual space missions in the hit indie game Kerbal Space Program. If you've ever been curious about ?v, Hohmann transfers, the Oberth effect, orbital resonance, aerobraking, lithobraking, Molniya orbits, specific impulse, Tsiolkovsky's rocket equation, Kepler's laws, or trying to determine just how much money humanity has spent rescuing Matt Damon.then this is the course for you!
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-12
Sports and the Law
Tanney M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Sports and the Law: Mascots, Money, and Monopolies The course explores complicated cultural issues through the lens of sports and the law, such as multi-million dollar athletics departments on college campuses, the evolution of gender equality in society through athletics participation, and current legal sports issues in the headlines. Should elite college athletes receive compensation for their name, image, and likeness? How do we define amateurism? Does legalized sports wagering affect the integrity of the game? The class will travel to the NCAA National Office in Indianapolis during the semester
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-13
Kurt Vonnegut
Carlson M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Kurt Vonnegut: A Man Unstuck in Time Kurt Vonnegut, a Hoosier born and bred, was one of the finest fiction writers of the 20th century. His work is simultaneously profound and profane, and by equal turns deadly serious and downright silly. As the novelist Jay McInerney put it, "Vonnegut is a satirist with a heart, a moralist with a whoopee cushion, a cynic who wants to believe." In this class, we'll study a variety of Vonnegut's works from the middle part of the 20th century. Despite their age, we'll see that they remain remarkably timely as they explore, among other topics, the responsibilities of science in society, automation and its implications for work, the absurdity of war, the relationship between who we really are and who we pretend to be, and what it means to be free and live a meaningful life. As you'll see, Vonnegut approaches these serious topics with his trademark blend of earnestness and an irreverent sense of humor, which makes his work a special delight to read.
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-15
God, Human Limits and Things
Bowen S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
God, Human Limits, and Things That Matter Nothing is forever, and not everything is possible. Limits exist and cannot be ignored without (potentially grave) consequences. In this seminar, we will consider important questions that confront us in our daily lives, and to which we must respond: "Are we as free as we think we are." "In what or in whom should we put our trust?" "What is worth loving or desiring?" "What do we dare hope for?" "Does the idea of God (or the infinite) cohere with the limits of human knowledge, and if so, how?" We will explore these questions through fiction, film, theological and philosophical texts, and other essays.
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-16
The Score
Abbott M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
The Score: Understanding the Secret Language of Film Music Hollywood soundtracks are America's classical music. For nearly 100 years, Hollywood composers have created the essential scores for our most memorable experiences at the movies. We will study these great composers and scrutinize their work to better understand how music functions on a special channel of communication and meaning in films. If you can read music or have a little music theory under your belt, your experience may be enhanced. However, a simple curiosity about film music is perfectly sufficient to succeed in this Tutorial.
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-17
Can We Unite?
Himsel S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Can We Unite? Lessons from Teddy Roosevelt Americans are bitterly divided along political lines. Our divisions have even extended to masks and vaccines. Legislation, if it moves forward at all, passes with little or no support from the opposing party. Politicians are so fearful of alienating their party's base that they cannot imagine compromise. Too often we see those on the "other side" not as worthy opponents, but as actual enemies. Can we unite? What sort of leaders have helped unite Americans in the past? Theodore Roosevelt was such a leader. Consider his record. TR was a partisan Republican who strongly believed in free enterprise. However, he also took on big business to protect competition and the rights of labor. TR strongly believed America should be a leading military power. But we did not fire a single shot against a foreign power during his Presidency. Indeed, while TR won the Congressional Medal of Honor for bravery in battle, he also won the Nobel Peace Prize. TR wanted to develop fully our natural resources, and he loved to hunt. But he was also our most vigorous environmentalist, saving millions of acres from development including treasures like the Grand Canyon. How did TR achieve all of these things at the same time? How did he use the media to unite the nation when today's leaders seem unable even to reach across the political aisle? We will seek wisdom we need to deal with our challenges today both at home and abroad. We will also explore how TR's wide-ranging interests and childlike zest for adventure helped make his amazing achievements possible.
1.00
TBA TBA
 
FRT-101-18
For the [outcome] of the Game
Dunaway E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
For the [outcome] of the Game All games, whether they require a ball, a stick, pen and paper, or a controller, require study to master, and the way we master them can change over time. Before the rise of sabermetrics, professional baseball scouts often looked at batting averages or slugging percentage when evaluating hitting talent, but afterwards shifted to metrics like on-base percentage. This course will examine how analytics across several professional sports have changed since the rise of data-driven results in the early 2000's. We'll hopefully answer questions like "Why did sabermetrics work well for the Oakland A's, but terribly for the Cleveland Browns?" or "How do we translate games above replacement to a salary among NBA players?" Be ready to learn some statistics and understand why your favorite team makes terrible decisions based on data!
1.00
TBA TBA
 
GEN - GENDER STUDIES
GEN-101-01
Int Gend Stu: Focus on E. Asia
Healey C
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
ASI-277-01=GEN-101-01=ASI-277-01F=GEN-101-01F Course Type: LFA/HPR/DR This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of gender studies by exploring questions about the meaning of gender in society with a special focus on East Asia. The course will familiarize students with the central issues, questions and debates in Gender Studies scholarship by analyzing themes of gendered performance and power in law, culture, education, work, health, social policy and the family. Key themes may include but are not limited to the relationship between sex and gender, the legal and social workings of the private / public distinction, the way that disciplinary practices code certain behaviors as masculine or feminine, the intersection of gender with race and ethnicity, the gendered structure of power, the tension between difference and equality, the production and circulation of gender expectations in the media, and the contested role of the law in achieving equality.
1.00
TBA TBA
16
GEN-101-01F
Int Gend Stu: Focus on E. Asia
Healey C
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
ASI-277-01=GEN-101-01=ASI-277-01F=GEN-101-01F Course Type: LFA/HPR/DR This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of gender studies by exploring questions about the meaning of gender in society with a special focus on East Asia. The course will familiarize students with the central issues, questions and debates in Gender Studies scholarship by analyzing themes of gendered performance and power in law, culture, education, work, health, social policy and the family. Key themes may include but are not limited to the relationship between sex and gender, the legal and social workings of the private / public distinction, the way that disciplinary practices code certain behaviors as masculine or feminine, the intersection of gender with race and ethnicity, the gendered structure of power, the tension between difference and equality, the production and circulation of gender expectations in the media, and the contested role of the law in achieving equality.
1.00
TBA TBA
4
GEN-105-01
Fatherhood
Olofson E
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
GEN-105-01=PSY-105-01
1.00
TBA TBA
40 28 
GEN-200-01
Philosophy of Gender
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
GEN-200-01=PHI-216-01=PPE-216-01=GEN-200-01F=PHI-216-01F=PPE-216- 01F
1.00
TBA TBA
17 16 
GEN-200-01F
Philosophy of Gender
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
GEN-200-01=PHI-216-01=PPE-216-01=GEN-200-01F=PHI-216-01F=PPE-216- 01F
1.00
TBA TBA
5
GEN-230-01
History of Masculinity and Men
Rhoades M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
GEN-230-01=HIS-230-01=GEN-230-01F=HIS-230-01F. At various stages in the modern era, men in the western world have found themselves in a state of "crisis" requiring men to find new ways to cope in the modern world. In HIS 230-01, students study concepts of masculinity and men's experiences since 1750. Much of the course focusses on men in the western world with some attention given to masculinity in nineteenth-century colonial settings. Issues of privilege, dominance, and sexuality will be considered as students study masculinity in relation to war, boxing, relationships, industrialization, racism, science, family life, reproduction, social setting, and bodily manipulation. Starting with a study of masculinity in manners and discipline before 1800, the course will end by asking if men of the 21st century have been emasculated and used up, crushed by the modern age, or if "masculinity" has always been in a state of crisis.and reinvention. Students should be prepared to read 30-50 pages for classes, write essay exams in class, and produce short papers.
1.00
TBA TBA
20 19 
GEN-230-01F
History of Masculinity and Men
Rhoades M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
GEN-230-01=HIS-230-01=GEN-230-01F=HIS-230-01F. At various stages in the modern era, men in the western world have found themselves in a state of "crisis" requiring men to find new ways to cope in the modern world. In HIS 230-01, students study concepts of masculinity and men's experiences since 1750. Much of the course focusses on men in the western world with some attention given to masculinity in nineteenth-century colonial settings. Issues of privilege, dominance, and sexuality will be considered as students study masculinity in relation to war, boxing, relationships, industrialization, racism, science, family life, reproduction, social setting, and bodily manipulation. Starting with a study of masculinity in manners and discipline before 1800, the course will end by asking if men of the 21st century have been emasculated and used up, crushed by the modern age, or if "masculinity" has always been in a state of crisis.and reinvention. Students should be prepared to read 30-50 pages for classes, write essay exams in class, and produce short papers.
1.00
TBA TBA
5
GEN-490-01
Gender Studies Capstone
Brewer A
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: GEN-101, , and 2 additional credits from GEN
1.00
TBA TBA
 
GER - GERMAN
GER-101-01
Elementary German I
van der Kolk J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Co-requisite: GER-101L
1.00
TBA TBA
15
GER-101-02
Elementary German I
van der Kolk J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Co-requisite: GER-101L
1.00
TBA TBA
15
GER-101L-01
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
M
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Co-requisite: GER-101
0.00
TBA TBA
5
GER-101L-02
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
TU
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Co-requisite: GER-101
0.00
TBA TBA
5
GER-101L-03
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: GER-101
0.00
TBA TBA
5
GER-101L-04
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
TH
09:45AM - 10:35AM
Co-requisite: GER-101
0.00
TBA TBA
5
GER-101L-05
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-requisite: GER-101
0.00
TBA TBA
5
GER-101L-06
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Co-requisite: GER-101
0.00
TBA TBA
5
GER-201-01
Intermediate German
Tucker B
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: GER-102, or GER-201 placement, Co-requisite: GER-201L
1.00
TBA TBA
20 12 
GER-201L-01
Intermediate German Lab.
Staff
TU
09:45AM - 10:35AM
Co-requisite: GER-201
0.00
TBA TBA
6
GER-201L-02
Intermediate German Lab.
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-requisite: GER-201
0.00
TBA TBA
6
GER-201L-03
Intermediate German Lab.
Staff
W
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Co-requisite: GER-201
0.00
TBA TBA
6
GER-201L-04
Intermediate German Lab.
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
Co-requisite: GER-201
0.00
TBA TBA
6
GER-301-01
Conversation & Composition
van der Kolk J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisite: GER-202, or GER-301 placement
1.00
TBA TBA
16
GER-313-01
Studies in German Literature
Tucker B
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prerequisites: GER-301 and GER-302
1.00
TBA TBA
16 11 
GHL - GLOBAL HEALTH
GHL-215-01
Environmental Philosophy
Gower J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
GHL-215-01=PHI-215-01=PPE-215-01
1.00
TBA TBA
18 14 
GHL-224-01
Econom & Political Development
Burnette J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
GHL-224-01=PPE-264-01=ECO-224-01 Prerequisite: ECO-101
1.00
TBA TBA
24 24 
GHL-235-01
Health Economics
Howland F
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
GHL-235-01=PPE-255-01=ECO-235-01
1.00
TBA TBA
25 24 
GHL-277-01
Intro to Epidemiology
Wetzel E, Hodges T
M
02:10PM - 03:50PM
W
02:10PM - 03:00PM
GHL-277-01=DV1-277-02
1.00
TBA TBA
16
GHL-400-01
Capstone in Global Health
Wetzel E
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prereq: BIO-177,PSC-201/SOC-201, and DV1-277.
0.00
TBA TBA
15 12 
GRK - GREEK
GRK-101-01
Beginning Greek I
Gorey M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Co-requisite: GRK-101L
1.00
TBA TBA
25 16 
GRK-101L-01
Beginning Greek I
Gorey M
TBA
TBA - TBA
Co-requisite: GRK-101
0.00
TBA TBA
 
GRK-201-01
Intermediate Greek I
Gorey M
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisites: GRK-101 and GRK-102
1.00
TBA TBA
 
HIS - HISTORY
HIS-101-01
World History to 1500
Morillo S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
25
HIS-101-01F
World History to 1500
Morillo S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
10 10 
HIS-101-02F
World History to 1500
Royalty B
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
35 35 
HIS-201-01F
Big History
Warner R
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
1.00
TBA TBA
25 25 
HIS-210-01
Jesus and Jewish War With Rome
Royalty B
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HIS-210-01=REL-250-01 Instructor permission only The course is a social and political history of Roman Judea and Galilee in the context of the life and death of Jesus of Nazareth and the Jewish Revolt against Rome. Both events offer windows into understanding the Roman world in the first century CE and the formation of Judaism from the diversity of the Second Temple Period. The course will include a strong emphasis on archaeology and the material culture of the sites, which have given scholars new insights into Jesus and the war in the past 40 years. This course includes an immersion trip to Israel during Thanksgiving Recess, 20-28 November 2021. We will visit the Galilee, Jerusalem, Jericho, Bethlehem, Qumran, and Masada.
1.00
TBA TBA
14
HIS-210-02
The Art of Power
Hartnett J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HIS-210-02=CLA-213-01=HIS-210-02F=CLA-213-01F Immense power rested in the hands of Rome's emperors. And while their peccadillos tend to dominate our imaginations today, in antiquity emperors' public images were carefully curated in a way that would make Madison Avenue ad agencies proud. Key in this endeavor was the deployment of artwork and building projects, which ranged from musclebound portraits and gilded building complexes to infrastructure that we might initially consider mundane, such as aqueducts and sewers. This course travels back in time to investigate the strategies that the imperial court used to claim, justify, and maintain its power within the city of Rome itself. To that end, part of our consideration will revolve around the monuments' multiple audiences - rivals to power, traditionalists, and a cosmopolitan population drawn from every corner of the empire. Presentations, quizzes, and a final project form the backbone of evaluation for the course.
1.00
TBA TBA
18 15 
HIS-210-02F
The Art of Power
Hartnett J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CLA-213-01=HIS-210-02=CLA-213-01F=HIS-210-02F Immense power rested in the hands of Rome's emperors. And while their peccadillos tend to dominate our imaginations today, in antiquity emperors' public images were carefully curated in a way that would make Madison Avenue ad agencies proud. Key in this endeavor was the deployment of artwork and building projects, which ranged from musclebound portraits and gilded building complexes to infrastructure that we might initially consider mundane, such as aqueducts and sewers. This course travels back in time to investigate the strategies that the imperial court used to claim, justify, and maintain its power within the city of Rome itself. To that end, part of our consideration will revolve around the monuments' multiple audiences - rivals to power, traditionalists, and a cosmopolitan population drawn from every corner of the empire. Presentations, quizzes, and a final project form the backbone of evaluation for the course.
1.00
TBA TBA
7
HIS-211-01
Ancient History: Greece
Wickkiser B
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HIS-211-01=CLA-105-01-HIS-211-01F=CLA-105-01F
1.00
TBA TBA
25 23 
HIS-211-01F
Ancient History: Greece
Wickkiser B
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HIS-211-01=CLA-105-01-HIS-211-01F=CLA-105-01F
1.00
TBA TBA
15 15 
HIS-230-01
History of Masculinity and Men
Rhoades M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
GEN-230-01=HIS-230-01=GEN-230-01F=HIS-230-01F. At various stages in the modern era, men in the western world have found themselves in a state of "crisis" requiring men to find new ways to cope in the modern world. In HIS 230-01, students study concepts of masculinity and men's experiences since 1750. Much of the course focusses on men in the western world with some attention given to masculinity in nineteenth-century colonial settings. Issues of privilege, dominance, and sexuality will be considered as students study masculinity in relation to war, boxing, relationships, industrialization, racism, science, family life, reproduction, social setting, and bodily manipulation. Starting with a study of masculinity in manners and discipline before 1800, the course will end by asking if men of the 21st century have been emasculated and used up, crushed by the modern age, or if "masculinity" has always been in a state of crisis.and reinvention. Students should be prepared to read 30-50 pages for classes, write essay exams in class, and produce short papers.
1.00
TBA TBA
20 16 
HIS-230-01F
History of Masculinity and Men
Rhoades M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
GEN-230-01=HIS-230-01=GEN-230-01F=HIS-230-01F. At various stages in the modern era, men in the western world have found themselves in a state of "crisis" requiring men to find new ways to cope in the modern world. In HIS 230-01, students study concepts of masculinity and men's experiences since 1750. Much of the course focusses on men in the western world with some attention given to masculinity in nineteenth-century colonial settings. Issues of privilege, dominance, and sexuality will be considered as students study masculinity in relation to war, boxing, relationships, industrialization, racism, science, family life, reproduction, social setting, and bodily manipulation. Starting with a study of masculinity in manners and discipline before 1800, the course will end by asking if men of the 21st century have been emasculated and used up, crushed by the modern age, or if "masculinity" has always been in a state of crisis.and reinvention. Students should be prepared to read 30-50 pages for classes, write essay exams in class, and produce short papers.
1.00
TBA TBA
5
HIS-240-01
Politics of Civil Rights Mvmt
Gelbman S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PSC-214-01=HIS-240-01=BLS-270-04. Instructor permission required.
1.00
TBA TBA
9
HIS-240-02
Civil Rights & the Black Arts
Vogel H
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
THE-103-01=BLS-270-07=HIS-240-02. Instructor permission required. The 1950s and 60s saw the emergence of two sociopolitical movements: the mostly rural-based Civil Rights Movement, and the mostly urban-centered Black Arts Movement. In this course, we will examine Black theatrical contributions to the movements: witnessing the sanctioning of violence on Black citizens and the representation of Black life and community. In 1955, the funeral of Emmett Till ignited wide-spread activism and James Baldwin's THE AMEN CORNER premiered at Howard University. In 1959, Lorraine Hansberry's A RAISIN IN THE SUN was the first play written, directed, and performed by Black theater artists on Broadway; and paralleled the news coverage of the Greensboro, South Carolina lunch counter sit-ins, as well as simultaneous sit-ins across the South. In the 1960s, Black-run theatres such as the New Lafayette in Harlem, the Negro Ensemble Company, and the Free Southern Theater produced playwrights Amiri Baraka, Ed Bullins, Ron Milner, Sonia Sanchez, Adrienne Kennedy, Alice Childress, Douglas Turner Ward and Joseph A. Walker, who were writing in a new Black idiom. In these plays of the Black Arts Movement, the protests and violence of the era are confronted on the stage, both in dialogue and action, melding the spheres of public and dramatic performance
1.00
TBA TBA
9
HIS-241-01
United States to 1865
Kunze S
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
35 16 
HIS-252-01
Peoples & Nations of Lat.Amer.
Warner R
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
25
HIS-300-01
Holy War in World History
Morillo S
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequisite: at least 0.5 credit in HIS
1.00
TBA TBA
15
HIS-330-01
Cities, Sewers, and Sex
Rhoades M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
0.5 credits from HIS.
1.00
TBA TBA
15 11 
HIS-497-01
Phil & Craft of Hist
Royalty B
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
TBA TBA
 
HIS-498-01
Senior Seminar
Warner R, Kunze S
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
30 16 
HSP - HISPANIC STUDIES
HSP-252-01
Peoples & Nations of Lat.Amer.
Warner R
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
25 22 
HSP-277-01
Economics of Latin America
Mikek P
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
HSP-277-01=ECO-277-01 The course includes a variety of topics focusing on current economic policies and institutional arrangements in Latin American countries, such as monetary policy, exchange rate regimes, international debt policies, challenges of growth and development (including natural resources), and demographic developments (including cultural, ethnic, and racial diversity, and economic inequality).The main goal of this class is to develop a deeper understanding of the economic structure and policies of a number of Latin American countries with particular emphasis on their international economic relations. Additionally, the class will help students to become familiar with some data sources for information on Latin America. Finally, economic policy is done in the cultural, historical and social context of individual countries, therefore some of this context will be included in class. The class will include a substantial number of case studies of particular economic issues in particular countries (examples may include exchange rate crisis in Argentina, international debt crisis in Mexico, successful economic growth in Chile, dollarization in Ecuador, prospects of economic transition in Cuba etc.). ECO-101
1.00
TBA TBA
30 30 
HSP-312-01
Philippines: His, Lit & Cult
Rogers D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HSP-312-01=SPA-312-01=ASI-277-03 This brand-new course on the Philippines will connect Asian and Hispanic Studies for the first time in our curriculum. Taught in English and counting for credit both programs, as well as Spanish, we'll spend the semester learning everything we can about the Philippine archipelago from a deeply interdisciplinary perspective: History, Geography, Film, Art, Literature, Language, Food, and Religion. We'll pay particular attention to the effects of colonialism on the Philippines as we explore the consequences of first Spain, then Japan, and finally the United States' occupation of the islands. PreReq SPA-301 and 302
1.00
TBA TBA
25 24 
HSP-313-01
Hsp Crime Fiction & Film Noir
Greenhalgh M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HSP-313-01=SPA-313-01 This course also count towards the FDM minor. This course introduces students to the origins, developments, elements, and ideological uses of Hispanic crime fiction and film noir. We will explore the main features of the crime genre in a short collection of literature/film in the Hispanic world from the early 20th century to the present. By emphasizing aesthetics, representation, and leitmotifs, students will analyze how authors and filmmakers engage issues of identity, belonging, and memory in the genre. This interdisciplinary course aims to give students a better understanding of crime fiction and film noir as a cultural space to discuss and critique social and political issues. SPA-301 and 302
1.00
TBA TBA
18 17 
HSP-400-01
Senior Capstone
Warner R
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
 
HUM - HUMANITIES
HUM-196-01
Relig in Japanese Literature
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ASI-196-01=HUM-196-01=REL-196-01. 2nd half semester. For the 1st half semester at 9:45 TuTh, see REL-275. "Old pond--frog jumps in--sound of water." So runs the famous haiku by Basho. Is it religious? For the Japanese, yes. In Japan religion and art are arguably the same thing. In this course we'll ask how and why. We'll study Japanese ideas about art and religion (e.g. emptiness, solitude, "sublime beauty"), and how they appear in Japanese literature. We'll read selections from Japanese poetry (including haiku), Noh drama, a classic novel (The Tale of Genji), and some short stories.
0.50
TBA TBA
20 15 
INT - INTERNSHIP
INT-398-01
Internship
Warner R
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
INT-498-01
Internship
Westphal C
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
INT-498-02
Internship
Howland F
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
LAT - LATIN
LAT-101-01
Beginning Latin I
Hartnett J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: LAT-101L
1.00
TBA TBA
15
LAT-101-01F
Beginning Latin I
Hartnett J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: LAT-101L
1.00
TBA TBA
10 10 
LAT-101L-01
Beginning Latin Lab
Hartnett J
TH
08:25AM - 09:15AM
Co-Requisite: LAT-101
0.00
TBA TBA
 
LAT-101L-02
Beginning Latin Lab
Hartnett J
TH
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Co-Requisite: LAT-101
0.00
TBA TBA
 
LAT-201-01
Intermediate Latin I
Wickkiser B
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisite: LAT-102, or placement in LAT-201
1.00
TBA TBA
 
LAT-301-01
Advanced Latin Reading: Poetry
Wickkiser B
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: LAT-201, or LAT-301 placement
1.00
TBA TBA
 
MAT - MATHEMATICS
MAT-010-01
Pre-Calc With Intro to Calc
Turner W
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisite: MAT-010 placement
1.00
TBA TBA
30 24 
MAT-103-01
Probability
Thompson P
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
20
MAT-108-01
Intro to Discrete Structures
Gates Z
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
TBA TBA
30
MAT-111-01
Calculus I
Gates Z
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
24 22 
MAT-111-02
Calculus I
Poffald E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
24 22 
MAT-111-03
Calculus I
Ansaldi K
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
24 24 
MAT-111-04
Calculus I
Ansaldi K
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
24 24 
MAT-112-01
Calculus II
Poffald E
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: MAT-110 or MAT-111 with a minimum grade of C-, or MAT-112 placement
1.00
TBA TBA
24 23 
MAT-112-02
Calculus II
Westphal C
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Prerequisite: MAT-110 or MAT-111 with a minimum grade of C-, or MAT-112 placement
1.00
TBA TBA
24 16 
MAT-178-01
Financial Mathematics
Thompson P
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
The course focuses on mathematical approaches to analyzing bonds and to loan repayment. We will start by looking at the growth of money due to interest, then move on to the present value of an annuity, bond pricing for option-free bonds, yield measures, spot rates, forward rates, return analysis, and the important concept of duration as a measure of price volatility. We will finish with mathematical approaches to loan repayment, with a special focus on a sinking funds approach. This course does not count toward the mathematics major or minor. Credit cannot be given for both for this course and MAT 106 Financial Mathematics or MAT 252 Mathematical Interest Theory.
0.50
TBA TBA
20 12 
MAT-223-01
Elementary Linear Algebra
Gates Z
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisite: MAT-112 with a minimum grade of C-, or MAT-223 placement.
1.00
TBA TBA
24
MAT-225-01
Multivariable Calculus
Turner W
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Prerequisites: MAT-112 with a minimum grade of C-, and MAT-223
1.00
TBA TBA
24 14 
MAT-251-01
Mathematical Finance
Thompson P
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: MAT-112
0.50
TBA TBA
20
MAT-252-01
Math Interest Theory
Ansaldi K
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: MAT-112
0.50
TBA TBA
20
MAT-253-01
Probability Models
Thompson P
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisite: MAT-112
0.50
TBA TBA
20
MAT-277-01
Into to Proof
Ansaldi K
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
An introduction to formal logic, set theory, and methods of proof. Topics include logic, quantifiers, set theory, mathematical induction, proof by contradiction and contraposition, relations, functions, modular arithmetic, and divisibility. Not available to students who have already completed MAT 331. Will count toward a Math major or minor. Will count for distribution in Quantitative Literacy.
0.50
TBA TBA
20 18 
MAT-277-02
Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos
Tompkins N
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MAT-277-02=PHY-277-01
1.00
TBA TBA
10
MAT-324-01
Partial Differential Equation
Westphal C
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq MAT-224
1.00
TBA TBA
15 11 
MAT-333-01
Funct Real Variable I
Poffald E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: MAT-223
1.00
TBA TBA
24 13 
MAT-338-01
Topics Computational Math
McCartin-Lim M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
MAT-338-01=CSC-338-01 Machine Learning: How does Alexa recognize your speech? How does Gmail filter spam from your inbox? How does Facebook identify you in photographs? How does Netflix recommend what movies you should watch? How does 23andMe link genetic factors to diseases? How does DeepMind develop artificial intelligence programs that can beat world champions in Chess and Go? Algorithms that automatically transform data into intelligent decision-making processes are now ubiquitous in society. The convergence of "big data" with massively parallel computational hardware has led to a renaissance in the exciting world of machine learning. This course will be an introduction to the theory and practice of machine learning. We will develop the foundations of machine learning, guided by principles such as Occam's razor and in consideration of hinderances such as the dreaded "curse of dimensionality". We will explore training and evaluation frameworks. We will look at a variety of tasks including classification, regression, clustering and reinforcement learning. We will learn about models such as decision trees, Bayesian learning, neural networks and deep learning. Prerequsites for this offering are CSC-111 and MAT-223 with a C- or greater. Prerequisites: CSC-111 and MAT-223 with a minimum grade of C-.
1.00
TBA TBA
24 23 
MAT-353-01
Probability Models II
Thompson P
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisite: MAT-253
0.50
TBA TBA
20 11 
MAT-377-01
Multivariate Statistics
Thompson P
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
The course gives a matrix-based treatment of multivariate statistics. Topics will include a brief review of linear algebra (idempotent matrices, orthogonal matrices, spectral decomposition theorem for symmetric matrices), principal components, multivariate distributions, the multivariate normal distribution, the Wishart distribution, multivariate regression, Hotelling's T2, and factor analysis. Credit cannot be given for both for this course and MAT 355 Regression Models. This course may be substituted for MAT 355 Regression Models as a required elective in the Financial Mathematics track of the Mathematics major.
0.50
TBA TBA
20 19 
MLL - MODERN LANGUAGES
MLL-476-01
Spec. Topics:Modern Languages
Li Y
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
MSL - MILITARY SCIENCE & LEADERSHIP
MSL-001-01
Leadership Lab (ROTC)
Staff
TH
03:30PM - 05:20PM
This is an ROTC course for all cadets and is held at the campus of Purdue University.
0.00
TBA TBA
10
MSL-101-01
Found of Officership (ROTC)
Staff
TH
01:30PM - 02:20PM
This is an ROTC course for first-year cadets and meets on the campus of Purdue University.
0.00
TBA TBA
10 10 
MSL-201-01
Ind Leadership Studies (ROTC)
Staff
TU TH
09:30AM - 10:20AM
This is an ROTC course for second year cadets and is held at the campus of Purdue University.
0.00
TBA TBA
10
MSL-301-01
Leadrship/Prob Solving (ROTC)
Staff
TU TH
10:30AM - 11:45AM
This is an ROTC course for third-year cadets.
0.00
TBA TBA
5
MUS - MUSIC
MUS-053-01
Glee Club (No Credit)
Williams S
M TU W TH
04:15PM - 06:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
80 80 
MUS-056-01
Wamidan Wld Music Ens (No Cr)
Makubuya J
W F
05:00PM - 06:00PM
0.00
TBA TBA
15 14 
MUS-101-01
Music in Society: A History
Ables M
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
15
MUS-102-01
World Music
Makubuya J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
TBA TBA
25 23 
MUS-104-01
And All That Jazz
Williams S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MUS-104-01=BLS-270-03 This course will explore the history and methods of American Jazz. Students will study the musical genres, geographical issues, and social movements that led to the creation of jazz and the development of the genre into present day. Major composers, arrangers, band leaders, and performers will be studied. As much of this music was derived from the combination of white and black experiences, racial issues associated with the arts and artistic creation will also be studied and discussed. The course will include a creative component where students will choose to write lyrics, compose music, and/or perform some jazz themselves. No prior musical experience is required to have a great time learning about jazz in American heritage!
1.00
TBA TBA
20
MUS-107-01
Basic Theory and Notation
Ables M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
25
MUS-156-01
Wamidan World Music Ensemble
Makubuya J
W F
05:00PM - 06:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
15 15 
MUS-204-01
Music: East Asian Cultures
Makubuya J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
MUS-204-01=ASI-204-01 The standard approach to this ASI 204-01/MUS 204-01 course this Fall '21 at Wabash College, is to start with an introductory survey and examination of a wide range and selection of traditional folk musical instruments affiliated with the East Asian cultures. The selected East Asian traditional folk instruments will be used to provide an introductory basis and examination for the study of their contextual as well as societal significance in the respective East Asian cultural societies. Beyond the instruments and their roles in producing musical sound, this course also examines the significant ceremonies, rites, and rituals enhanced by the folk music. In addition to the music, this class also serves as a forum for learning about the selected East Asian cultures as case studies. The selected cultures will include those from: China, India, Pakistan, Indonesia, Japan, Vietnam, Korea, Laos, Burma, Philippines, and Malaysia.
1.00
TBA TBA
15 15 
MUS-205-01
European Music Before 1750
Ables M
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
20 14 
MUS-302-01
Music Theory III
Williams S, Makubuya J
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequisite: MUS-301., Co-Requisite: MUS-302L.
1.00
TBA TBA
10
MUS-302L-01
Music Theory III Lab
Makubuya J, Williams S
TBA
TBA - TBA
Co-Requisite: MUS-302.
0.00
TBA TBA
10
MUS-401-01
Senior Seminar
Ables M
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
 
NSC - NEUROSCIENCE
NSC-333-01
Research Behav. Neuroscience
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
NSC-333-01=PSY-333-01 Prerequisite: PSY-233 or BIO-112.
0.50
TBA TBA
12
PE - PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE-011-01
Advanced Fitness
Brumett K, P. Sullivan
M W F
06:00AM - 07:15AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PE-011-02
Advanced Fitness
Martin J, J. Niespodziany
M W F
06:00AM - 06:50AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PE-011-03
Advanced Fitness
Martin J, J. Niespodziany
M W F
07:00AM - 07:50AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PHI - PHILOSOPHY
PHI-110-01
Philosophical Ethics
Hughes C
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
TBA TBA
24
PHI-110-02F
Philosophical Ethics
Hughes C
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
TBA TBA
20 19 
PHI-215-01
Environmental Philosophy
Gower J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PHI-215-01=PPE-215-01=GHL-215-01
1.00
TBA TBA
18 11 
PHI-216-01
Philosophy of Gender
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
GEN-200-01=PHI-216-01=PPE-216-01=GEN-200-01F=PHI-216-01F=PPE-216- 01F
1.00
TBA TBA
17 11 
PHI-216-01F
Philosophy of Gender
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
GEN-200-01=PHI-216-01=PPE-216-01=GEN-200-01F=PHI-216-01F=PPE-216- 01F
1.00
TBA TBA
5
PHI-218-01
Philosophy of Commerce
Gower J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PHI-218-01=PPE-218-01
1.00
TBA TBA
30
PHI-220-01
Aesthetics
Carlson M
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PHI-220-01=ART-311-01
1.00
TBA TBA
20
PHI-240-01
Ancient Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CLA-240-01=PHI-240-01=CLA-240-01F=PHI-240-01F
1.00
TBA TBA
27
PHI-240-01F
Ancient Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CLA-240-01=PHI-240-01=CLA-240-01F=PHI-240-01F
1.00
TBA TBA
4
PHI-269-01
Topics Metaphysic Epistemology
Carlson M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Here are some things that I take myself to know. The world around me is real, and not merely a simulation. The universe is billions of years old, and did not come into existence five minutes ago. Antarctica is a continent, but the Arctic is not. There are 211 Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives. The sun will rise tomorrow. But how do I know those things? What reliable information can I really have about the world around me? These questions are made particularly pressing by the existence of philosophical skepticism, according to which it is impossible for us to know what the world around us is actually like. Despite skepticism's absurd appearance, it is of enduring interest because of the power of the arguments in favor of it. Thus, to study skepticism, we will direct most of our attention to the careful study of arguments. The arguments we study will come from classic and contemporary philosophical works, and we will study them by using software called MindMup to map their structure. This will put us in a position to understand and evaluate these skeptical arguments, with an eye toward determining how we can have knowledge of the world around us.
1.00
TBA TBA
20 15 
PHI-345-01
Continental Philosophy
Hughes C
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: PHI-240 (or taken concurrently), and PHI-242
1.00
TBA TBA
14
PHI-449-01
Senior Seminar
Trott A
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
The senior seminar focuses on one text across the semester - Plato's Republic - with the goal of having students develop a seminar paper in which they take up their own set of questions and concerns about the text. Students will develop research skills to write a long essay on the text. Required for all senior philosophy majors.
1.00
TBA TBA
10
PHY - PHYSICS
PHY-101-01
Astronomy
Ross G
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Co-Requisite: PHY-101L
1.00
TBA TBA
40
PHY-101L-01
Astronomy Lab
Ross G
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-101
0.00
TBA TBA
20
PHY-101L-02
Astronomy Lab
Ross G
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-101
0.00
TBA TBA
20
PHY-109-01
Physics I - Algebra
Tompkins N
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Co-Requisite: PHY-109L
1.00
TBA TBA
40 14 
PHY-109L-01
Physics I - Algebra Lab
Tompkins N
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-109
0.00
TBA TBA
20
PHY-109L-02
Physics I - Algebra Lab
Tompkins N
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-109
0.00
TBA TBA
20 10 
PHY-111-01
Physics I - Calculus
Krause D
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Prerequisites: MAT-110 or MAT-111, or placement into MAT-111 with concurrent registration, or placement into MAT-112 or MAT-223, Co-Requisite: PHY-111L
1.00
TBA TBA
28 14 
PHY-111-01F
Physics I - Calculus
Krause D
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Prerequisites: MAT-110 or MAT-111, or placement into MAT-111 with concurrent registration, or placement into MAT-112 or MAT-223, Co-Requisite: PHY-111L
1.00
TBA TBA
12 12 
PHY-111L-01
Physics I - Calculus Lab
Krause D
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-111
0.00
TBA TBA
12
PHY-111L-01F
Physics I - Calculus Lab
Krause D
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-111
0.00
TBA TBA
8
PHY-111L-02
Physics I - Calculus Lab
Krause D
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-111
0.00
TBA TBA
16
PHY-111L-02F
Physics I - Calculus Lab
Krause D
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-111
0.00
TBA TBA
4
PHY-209-01
Intro Thermal Phy & Relativity
Brown J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisites: PHY-112 with a minimum grade of C-, and MAT-112, Co-Requisite: PHY-209L
1.00
TBA TBA
16
PHY-209L-01
Thermal Physics Lab
Brown J
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-209, Prerequisites: PHY-112 and MAT-112
0.00
TBA TBA
16
PHY-277-01
Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos
Tompkins N
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
This course will serve as a broad introduction to nonlinear dynamics, for students with no prior exposure to the subject. Topics will include bifurcations, oscillations, phase portraits, limit cycles, chaos, and fractals.
1.00
TBA TBA
10
PHY-310-01
Classical Mechanics
Brown J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PHY-112 with a minimum grade of C- and MAT-224, or permission of instructor
1.00
TBA TBA
20 17 
PHY-315-01
Quantum Mechanics
Ross G
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Prerequisites: PHY-210 with a minimum grade of C-, MAT-223, and MAT-224
1.00
TBA TBA
20 11 
PHY-381-01
Advanced Laboratory I
Brown J
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Prerequisite: PHY-210, Co-Requisite: PHY-381L
0.50
TBA TBA
10
PHY-382-01
Advanced Laboratory II
Brown J
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Prerequisite: PHY-381
0.50
TBA TBA
10
PHY-382-02
Advanced Laboratory II
Brown J
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: PHY-381
0.50
TBA TBA
 
PPE - PHILOSOPHY POLITICS ECONOMICS
PPE-215-01
Environmental Philosophy
Gower J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PPE-215-01=GHL-215-01=PHI-215-01
1.00
TBA TBA
18 11 
PPE-216-01
Philosophy of Gender
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
GEN-200-01=PHI-216-01=PPE-216-01=GEN-200-01F=PHI-216-01F=PPE-216- 01F
1.00
TBA TBA
17 16 
PPE-216-01F
Philosophy of Gender
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
GEN-200-01=PHI-216-01=PPE-216-01=GEN-200-01F=PHI-216-01F=PPE-216- 01F
1.00
TBA TBA
5
PPE-218-01
Philosophy of Commerce
Gower J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PPE-218-01=PHI-218-01
1.00
TBA TBA
30 21 
PPE-233-01
Tocqueville and Fraternity
McCrary L
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PPE-233-01=PSC-233-01
1.00
TBA TBA
18 11 
PPE-255-01
Health Economics
Howland F
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
PPE-255-01=GHL-235-01=ECO-235-01 Take ECO-101.
1.00
TBA TBA
25 20 
PPE-258-01
Behavioral Economics
Dunaway E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Behavioral Economics, a relatively new field in economic theory, attempts to bridge the divide between the classical microeconomic model and what we observe in the real world. In this class, we will explore concepts like mental accounting (or why my bank account never seems to have as much money in it as I remember), hyperbolic discounting (or why I keep hitting the snooze button on my alarm clock), reciprocity (or why I charge less to people I know better), and prospect theory (or why I weigh my fear of getting a C on an exam much more than my joy of getting an A on it), among other topics. PPE-258-01=ECO-277-03 Take ECO-101.
1.00
TBA TBA
25 23 
PPE-264-01
Economic & Political Dvlpmnt
Burnette J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
PPE-264-01=GHL-224-01=ECO-224-01 Take ECO-101
1.00
TBA TBA
24 18 
PPE-331-01
Nationalism & Ethnic Conflict
Hollander E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PPE-331-01=PSC-327-01 Prerequisite: PSC-121 with a minimum grade of C-
1.00
TBA TBA
12
PPE-333-01
Constitutional Law
Himsel S
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PPE-333-01=PSC-313-01 Prerequisiste: Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors Only
1.00
TBA TBA
20 11 
PPE-400-01
Senior Seminar for PPE
Snow N, Gower J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisites: PPE-200 and at least one 300 level PPE course, or permission of the instructor
1.00
TBA TBA
18
PSC - POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSC-111-01
Intro to Amer Govt & Politics
Gelbman S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
18
PSC-111-01F
Intro to Amer Govt & Politics
Gelbman S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
12 12 
PSC-121-01
Intro to Comparative Politics
Hollander E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
18
PSC-121-01F
Intro to Comparative Politics
Hollander E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
12 12 
PSC-131-01
Intro to Political Theory
McCrary L
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
18
PSC-131-01F
Intro to Political Theory
McCrary L
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
12 12 
PSC-141-01
Intro to Intn'l Relations
Wells M
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
18
PSC-141-01F
Intro to Intn'l Relations
Wells M
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
12 12 
PSC-200-01
Political Inquiry & Analysis
Gelbman S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Prerequisite: One credit from PSC-111, or PSC-121, or PSC-131, or PSC-141. Permission from instructor required for enrollment.
1.00
TBA TBA
12
PSC-214-01
Politics of Civil Rights Mvmt
Gelbman S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PSC-214-01=HIS-240-01=BLS-270-04. Instructor permission required.
1.00
TBA TBA
9 -2 
PSC-233-01
Tocqueville and Fraternity
McCrary L
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PSC-233-01=PPE=233-01
1.00
TBA TBA
18
PSC-287-01
Statistic/Research Methods Psc
Hollander E
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
2
PSC-300-01
Research/Stats Political Sci
Hollander E
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
18
PSC-313-01
Constitutional Law
Himsel S
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PSC-313-01=PPE-333-01 Prerequisiste: Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors Only
1.00
TBA TBA
20
PSC-327-01
Nationalism & Ethnic Conflict
Hollander E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PSC-327-01=PPE-331-01 Prerequisite: PSC-121 with a minimum grade of C-
1.00
TBA TBA
12
PSC-347-01
Conflict, War, and Peace
Wells M
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PSC-141
1.00
TBA TBA
12
PSC-497-01
Senior Seminar
McCrary L, Wells M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
TBA TBA
25
PSY - PSYCHOLOGY
PSY-101-01
Introduction to Psychology
Staff
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
40 18 
PSY-101-02F
Introduction to Psychology
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
40 40 
PSY-105-01
Fatherhood
Olofson E
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PSY-105-01=GEN-105-01
1.00
TBA TBA
40 12 
PSY-110-01
Happiness
Bost P
TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
The Declaration of Independence asserts that the "pursuit of Happiness" is a fundamental right, endowed by none other than the Creator. Great news! But what exactly are we pursuing? And how do we catch it? This course will introduce students to the science of well-being and its implications for the everyday pursuit of happiness. Course activities will include exercises for increasing a sense of well-being.
0.50
TBA TBA
25
PSY-201-01
Research Methods & Stats I
Gunther K
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Prerequisite: PSY-101
1.00
TBA TBA
30
PSY-202-01
Research Methods & Stats II
Schmitzer-Torbert N
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prerequisite: PSY-201
1.00
TBA TBA
30 19 
PSY-220-01
Child Development
Olofson E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequisite: PSY-101 or PSY-105
1.00
TBA TBA
16
PSY-231-01
Cognition
Bost P
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Prerequisite: PSY-201.
1.00
TBA TBA
16
PSY-232-01
Sensation and Perception
Gunther K
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: NSC-204, PSY-204, BIO-101 or BIO-111
1.00
TBA TBA
25 16 
PSY-301-01
Literature Review
Bost P
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Prerequisite: PSY-201
1.00
TBA TBA
10
PSY-322-01
Research in Social Psychology
Staff
TU
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prerequisite: PSY-202 and PSY-222
0.50
TBA TBA
12
PSY-333-01
Research Behav. Neuroscience
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
PSY-333-01=NSC-333-01 PreReq PSY-233.
0.50
TBA TBA
12
PSY-495-01
Senior Capstone 1
Schmitzer-Torbert N
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: PSY-202, and PSY-301 (may be taken concurrently)
0.50
TBA TBA
 
REL - RELIGION
REL-103-01
Islam & the Religions of India
Blix D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
45
REL-103-01F
Islam & the Religions of India
Blix D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
5
REL-171-01
History Christianity to Reform
Urvas S
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
45 38 
REL-171-01F
History Christianity to Reform
Urvas S
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
5
REL-173-01
Introduction to Theology
Urvas S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
All of us have endured and most of us have survived a new form of a very old thing: a plague. Can theology help us understand and interpret what we have experienced in Covid-19? Consider these insights, and decide for yourself. The term "sanctification" means the making holy of an ordinary thing; perhaps seeing a smile again, or hugging your grandparent, or even just sitting in a restaurant to enjoy a meal can be seen as holy. One way of understanding "sin" is along the lines of scapegoating and self-justification; finger-pointing and mutual blaming on a global scale emerged in the pandemic's earliest days. The concept of "creation" entails seeing our world as network of vulnerabilities, because humans are defined by their need of nurture, companionship, and shelter, and creation is a therefore a place of proliferation, imitation, replication and novelty. This course, usually a generic introduction to theology, focuses attention on what we can understand about ourselves and about transcendence in the world in these very un-generic times of plague.
1.00
TBA TBA
20 16 
REL-181-01
Religion in America
Baer J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
40 17 
REL-181-01F
Religion in America
Baer J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
10 10 
REL-196-01
Relig in Japanese Literature
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ASI-196-01=HUM-196-01=REL-196-01. 2nd half semester. For the 1st half semester at 9:45 TuTh, see REL-275. "Old pond--frog jumps in--sound of water." So runs the famous haiku by Basho. Is it religious? For the Japanese, yes. In Japan religion and art are arguably the same thing. In this course we'll ask how and why. We'll study Japanese ideas about art and religion (e.g. emptiness, solitude, "sublime beauty"), and how they appear in Japanese literature. We'll read selections from Japanese poetry (including haiku), Noh drama, a classic novel (The Tale of Genji), and some short stories.
0.50
TBA TBA
20
REL-250-01
Jesus & Jewish Revolt Against
Royalty B
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HIS-210-01=REL-250-01 Instructor permission only The course is a social and political history of Roman Judea and Galilee in the context of the life and death of Jesus of Nazareth and the Jewish Revolt against Rome. Both events offer windows into understanding the Roman world in the first century CE and the formation of Judaism from the diversity of the Second Temple Period. The course will include a strong emphasis on archaeology and the material culture of the sites, which have given scholars new insights into Jesus and the war in the past 40 years. This course includes an immersion trip to Israel during Thanksgiving Recess, 20-28 November 2021. We will visit the Galilee, Jerusalem, Jericho, Bethlehem, Qumran, and Masada.
1.00
TBA TBA
14
REL-270-01
Theological Ethics
Bowen S
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
TBA TBA
15
REL-273-01
Theology of Evil
Urvas S
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Theology of Evil: Satan, Demons, and Witchcraft This discussion course provides a window to the theology of evil. The journey will start from evil biblical figures such as Satan, the Devil, and demons, then continue by exploring the creation and cosmos in relation to metaphysics and the ontology of evil, learning especially from the early Patristic writers. We will move through the centuries towards the current global challenges related to the question of evil spiritual beings, leading to the topic of witchcraft. Issues discussed include theological anthropology and the theology of the Fall, human responsibility in relation to evil spiritual agency, and current trends in global theology and human rights.
1.00
TBA TBA
20 12 
REL-275-01
Religion and Science
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1st half semester. For the 2nd half semester course at 9:45 TuTh, see REL-196-01/ASI-196-01/HUM-196-01. Are religion and science in conflict with each other? In agreement? How or why, one way or the other? These are our questions. We'll do two main things in this course. First, we'll take a careful look at the different "ways of knowing" that are characteristic of science and religion, respectively. Second, we'll look at several models for thinking critically and responsibly about how they are related. Readings will include selections from Bertolt Brecht, Alan Lightman, Jacob Bronowski, Adam Frank, and others, as well as some classic texts in the history of science.
0.50
TBA TBA
20
REL-280-01
Christianity & American Foundi
Baer J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
What role did Christianity play in the founding of the United States? In shaping the thought and actions of its founding figures? Its foundational documents? Was the U.S. established as a Christian nation? A secular nation? Something else? This seminar will delve into these critical questions that have animated American history and continue to impact our collective cultural, social, and political life. We will examine the history of Christianity in colonial America and the new nation, with particular focus on the Revolutionary War, the development of the Constitution, and its implementation in the early republic. Relevant topics include religious pluralism, freedom of religion, disestablishment, and religion in public life.
1.00
TBA TBA
20 17 
REL-297-01
Anthropology of Religion
Baer J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
A seminar examining the various ways anthropology describes and interprets religious phenomena. We will study anthropological theories of religion, and focus on how these theories apply to specific religions in diverse contexts, especially among indigenous peoples. We will pay particular attention to the social and symbolic functions of beliefs and rituals and to the religious importance of myths, symbols, and cosmology.
1.00
TBA TBA
20
REL-490-01
Sr. Sem: Nature & Study of Rel
Blix D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
TBA TBA
 
RHE - RHETORIC
RHE-101-01
Public Speaking
Staff
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
16
RHE-101-01F
Public Speaking
Staff
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
4
RHE-101-02
Public Speaking
Staff
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
16
RHE-101-02F
Public Speaking
Staff
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
4
RHE-101-03F
Public Speaking
Drury J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
15 15 
RHE-101-04
Public Speaking
Staff
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
16
RHE-101-04F
Public Speaking
Staff
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
4
RHE-201-01
Reasoning & Advocacy
Drury J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
TBA TBA
20
RHE-220-01
Persuasion
Staff
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
TBA TBA
20
RHE-270-01
Rhetoric, Science, Public Plcy
Drury S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
What is the role of rhetoric in the public understanding of science, and in the creation of science-focused public policy? This course investigates the intersections of rhetoric and science in public engagement, exploring historical and contemporary examples in medicine, health, environmental studies, space, and nanotechnology. Throughout the semester, we will consider the use of tropes in science communication, how the technical, public, and personal spheres of argumentation impact public policy, and the opportunities and challenges of public engagement in science. This course is well suited for rhetoric students interested in analyzing science-focused public discourse, and science students interested in the public communication of science.
1.00
TBA TBA
17
RHE-270-01F
Rhetoric,science & Public Pol.
Drury S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
3
RHE-350-01
Contemp Rhetorical Theo & Crit
Abbott J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Prerequisite: FRT-101
1.00
TBA TBA
16
RHE-370-01
Rhetoric of the News Media
Abbott J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
The news media have been the subject of much heated debate in the past several years. In this seminar-style course, we will explore the role, nature, truthfulness, and functions of the news media through a rhetorical lens. More specifically, we will approach news reports as rhetorical texts as we ask such question as: What qualifies as news; who decides; and how might charges of falsehood relate to these queries? How do traditional journalists and partisan outlets differently define, frame, and report news? And how do their stories influence our perceptions of the topics they address? Finally, what is or should be the role of the news media in a democratic society? In our discussion of these and similar questions, we will consider the historical development of the news media as well as the financial, media, and institutional factors that shape and constrain the news. Students will engage in close rhetorical analysis of news stories and will produce their own news reports. Prerequisite: FRT-101 (Freshman Tutorial).
1.00
TBA TBA
16
RHE-497-01
Senior Seminar
Abbott J, Drury J, Drury S
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
 
SPA - SPANISH
SPA-101-01
Elementary Spanish I
Welch M
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-101L
1.00
TBA TBA
8
SPA-101-01F
Elementary Spanish I
Welch M
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-101L
1.00
TBA TBA
10 10 
SPA-101L-01
Elementary Spanish I Lab
Staff
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-101
0.00
TBA TBA
6
SPA-101L-02
Elementary Spanish I Lab
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-101
0.00
TBA TBA
6
SPA-101L-03
Elementary Spanish I Lab
Staff
TU
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-101
0.00
TBA TBA
6
SPA-103-01
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Rogers D
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Requires SPA-103 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-103L
1.00
TBA TBA
8
SPA-103-01F
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Rogers D
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Requires SPA-103 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-103L
1.00
TBA TBA
10 10 
SPA-103-02
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Monsalve M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Requires SPA-103 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-103L
1.00
TBA TBA
8
SPA-103-02F
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Monsalve M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Requires SPA-103 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-103L
1.00
TBA TBA
10 10 
SPA-103L-01
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103
0.00
TBA TBA
6
SPA-103L-02
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103
0.00
TBA TBA
6
SPA-103L-03
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103
0.00
TBA TBA
6
SPA-103L-04
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103
0.00
TBA TBA
6
SPA-103L-05
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103
0.00
TBA TBA
6
SPA-103L-06
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103
0.00
TBA TBA
6
SPA-201-01
Intermediate Spanish
Hardy J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103, or SPA-201 placement, Co-requisite: SPA-201L
1.00
TBA TBA
8
SPA-201-01F
Intermediate Spanish
Hardy J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103, or SPA-201 placement, Co-requisite: SPA-201L
1.00
TBA TBA
10 10 
SPA-201-02
Intermediate Spanish
Greenhalgh M
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103, or SPA-201 placement, Co-requisite: SPA-201L
1.00
TBA TBA
8
SPA-201-02F
Intermediate Spanish
Greenhalgh M
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103, or SPA-201 placement, Co-requisite: SPA-201L
1.00
TBA TBA
10 10 
SPA-201-03
Intermediate Spanish
Hardy J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103, or SPA-201 placement, Co-requisite: SPA-201L
1.00
TBA TBA
8
SPA-201-03F
Intermediate Spanish
Hardy J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103, or SPA-201 placement, Co-requisite: SPA-201L
1.00
TBA TBA
10 10 
SPA-201L-01
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201
0.00
TBA TBA
7
SPA-201L-02
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201
0.00
TBA TBA
7
SPA-201L-03
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
TU
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201
0.00
TBA TBA
7
SPA-201L-04
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201
0.00
TBA TBA
7
SPA-201L-05
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201
0.00
TBA TBA
7
SPA-201L-06
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201
0.00
TBA TBA
7
SPA-201L-07
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201
0.00
TBA TBA
7
SPA-202-01
Span Lang & Hispanic Cultures
Hardy J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisite: SPA-201, or SPA-202 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-202L
1.00
TBA TBA
12
SPA-202-01F
Span Lang & Hispanic Cultures
Hardy J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Prerequisite: SPA-201, or SPA-202 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-202L
1.00
TBA TBA
6
SPA-202L-01
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-202
0.00
TBA TBA
6
SPA-202L-02
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-202
0.00
TBA TBA
6
SPA-202L-03
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-202
0.00
TBA TBA
6
SPA-301-01
Conversation & Composition
Greenhalgh M
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prerequisite: SPA-202, or SPA-301 placement
1.00
TBA TBA
18 12 
SPA-302-01
Intro to Literature
Rogers D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prerequisite: SPA-301 or SPA-321, or SPA-302 placement.
1.00
TBA TBA
 
SPA-312-01
Philippines: His, Lit & Cult
Rogers D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
SPA-312-01=HSP-312-01=ASI-277-03 This brand-new course on the Philippines will connect Asian and Hispanic Studies for the first time in our curriculum. Taught in English and counting for credit both programs, as well as Spanish, we'll spend the semester learning everything we can about the Philippine archipelago from a deeply interdisciplinary perspective: History, Geography, Film, Art, Literature, Language, Food, and Religion. We'll pay particular attention to the effects of colonialism on the Philippines as we explore the consequences of first Spain, then Japan, and finally the United States' occupation of the islands. Prerequisites: SPA-301 or SPA-321 and SPA-302., SPA 302
1.00
TBA TBA
25 11 
SPA-313-01
Hsp Crime Fiction & Film Noir
Greenhalgh M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
SPA-313-01=HSP-313-01 This course also count towards the FDM minor. This course introduces students to the origins, developments, elements, and ideological uses of Hispanic crime fiction and film noir. We will explore the main features of the crime genre in a short collection of literature/film in the Hispanic world from the early 20th century to the present. By emphasizing aesthetics, representation, and leitmotifs, students will analyze how authors and filmmakers engage issues of identity, belonging, and memory in the genre. This interdisciplinary course aims to give students a better understanding of crime fiction and film noir as a cultural space to discuss and critique social and political issues. Prerequiste: SPA-301 or SPA-321 and 302, SPA 302
1.00
TBA TBA
18 14 
SPA-401-01
Spanish Senior Seminar
Monsalve M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequisite: SPA-302
1.00
TBA TBA
18 12 
THE - THEATER
THE-101-01
Introduction to Theater
Vogel H
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
25
THE-103-01
Civil Rights the Black Arts
Vogel H
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
THE-103-01=BLS-270-07=HIS-240-02. Instructor permission required. The 1950s and 60s saw the emergence of two sociopolitical movements: the mostly rural-based Civil Rights Movement, and the mostly urban-centered Black Arts Movement. In this course, we will examine Black theatrical contributions to the movements: witnessing the sanctioning of violence on Black citizens and the representation of Black life and community. In 1955, the funeral of Emmett Till ignited wide-spread activism and James Baldwin's THE AMEN CORNER premiered at Howard University. In 1959, Lorraine Hansberry's A RAISIN IN THE SUN was the first play written, directed, and performed by Black theater artists on Broadway; and paralleled the news coverage of the Greensboro, South Carolina lunch counter sit-ins, as well as simultaneous sit-ins across the South. In the 1960s, Black-run theatres such as the New Lafayette in Harlem, the Negro Ensemble Company, and the Free Southern Theater produced playwrights Amiri Baraka, Ed Bullins, Ron Milner, Sonia Sanchez, Adrienne Kennedy, Alice Childress, Douglas Turner Ward and Joseph A. Walker, who were writing in a new Black idiom. In these plays of the Black Arts Movement, the protests and violence of the era are confronted on the stage, both in dialogue and action, melding the spheres of public and dramatic performance
1.00
TBA TBA
9
THE-104-01
Introduction to Film
Cherry J
M F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
W
02:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
40
THE-105-01
Introduction to Acting
Vogel H
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
TBA TBA
13
THE-105-01F
Introduction to Acting
Vogel H
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
TBA TBA
3
THE-202-01
Intro to Scenic Design
Staff
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
12
THE-202-01F
Intro to Scenic Design
Staff
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
3
THE-203-01
Costume Design
Bear A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
10
THE-203-01F
Costume Design
Bear A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
2
THE-207-01
Directing
Abbott M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PreReq THE-105
1.00
TBA TBA
8
THE-216-01
The Modern Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
THE-216-01=ENG-310-01
1.00
TBA TBA
15
THE-303-01
Intro to Shakespeare
Benedicks C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
THE-303-01=ENG-216-01
1.00
TBA TBA
30 29 
THE-498-01
Senior Seminar
Cherry J
M F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
8