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20/FA Course Faculty Days Comments/Requisites Credits Location Capacity Available Seats
ACC - ACCOUNTING
ACC-201-01
Financial Accounting
Hensley E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
BAX 101
25
ACC-201-02
Financial Accounting
J. Foos
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
BAX 101
25
ACC-301-01
Intermediate Accounting I
Hensley E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Prerequisite: ACC-202 1.00
BAX 311
25 16 
ART - ART
ART-125-01
Drawing
Mohl D
M W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
FIN A131
9
ART-125-01D
Drawing
Mohl D
M W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
1
ART-202-01
Art in Film
Morton E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. 1.00
LIB GOODRICH
30
ART-202-01D
Art in Film
Morton E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
VIRTUAL COURSE 1.00
TBA TBA
4
ART-202-01F
Art in Film
Morton E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. 1.00
LIB GOODRICH
6
ART-209-01
20th and 21st Century Art
Morton E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRTUAL COURSE 1.00
DET 109
15
ART-209-01D
20th and 21st Century Art
Morton E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRTUAL COURSE 1.00
TBA TBA
4
ART-223-01
Ceramics
Strader A
TU TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
FIN A105
10
ART-223-01D
Ceramics
Strader A
TU TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
1
ART-224-01
Photography
Weedman M
M W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
BAX 214
13
ART-225-01
Experimental Animation
Mohl D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE This survey course will provide students with the basic knowledge and tools needed to create their own animations using Abode After Effects. Techniques covered may include: Animating layers, working with masks, distorting objects with the Puppet Tools, using the Roto Brush Tool, color correction and working with the 3D Camera Tracker. Sound design, composition and other basic image-making principles will be explored. We will also examine the aesthetic nature of experimental film and specifically how it can be applied to animation. There will be a studio art component during the second half of the semester during which each student will create their own original short experimental animation. 1.00
FIN A113
5
ART-225-02
Advnced Experimental Animation
Mohl D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE This survey course will provide students with the basic knowledge and tools needed to create their own animations using Abode After Effects. Techniques covered may include: Animating layers, working with masks, distorting objects with the Puppet Tools, using the Roto Brush Tool, color correction and working with the 3D Camera Tracker. Sound design, composition and other basic image-making principles will be explored. We will also examine the aesthetic nature of experimental film and specifically how it can be applied to animation. There will be a studio art component during the second half of the semester during which each student will create their own original short experimental animation. 1.00
FIN A131
2
ART-312-01D
Post Modern Art & Culture
Morton E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE Prerequisite: One course in Art History. 1.00
LIB MCC
8
ART-331-01
Advanced Studio
Mohl D
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisites: Two credits from ART-125, 126, 223, 224, 225, 227, 228, and 229. At least one credit from the 200 level. 1.00
FIN A124
 
ART-433-01
Senior Studio
Mohl D
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisites: ART-330 or 331. 1.00
FIN A124
 
ASI - ASIAN STUDIES
ASI-277-01
Special Topics: Global Economy
Saha S
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE. ECO220-01=ASI277-01=PPE256-01 The goal of this course is to offer an overview of different aspects of the global economy. It provides a basic understanding of the fundamental theories of international economics including both international trade and international finance, with regard to the historical and institutional contexts in which the U.S. economy operates, and to broaden the understanding of other economies by studying their policy problems within the analytical framework of international economics. With globalization, an economy cannot be treated individually, and so it is important to know how differences in location can make economic activities easier. This course has two parts: the first part will focus on topics on international trade such as, trade theories, trade policies and impacts of international trade on the environment. The second part of this course will concentrate on topics on international finance such as, balance of payments, exchange rates, regional issues in global economy, etc. This course explores the economic fundamentals regarding the dynamics of global economy, and how to relate it to the current, global and real-world scenarios in terms of economic, social, and political interactions. For this section of ASI-277, there is a prerequisite of ECO-101. 1.00
GOO 104
25 25 
BIO - BIOLOGY
BIO-101-01
Human Biology
P. Garrett, Wetzel E, Chen W
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. Co-Requisite: BIO-101L 1.00
ATH FIELD
56
BIO-101L-01
Human Biology Lab
Wetzel E
TU
12:30PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-101 0.00
HAY 110
20
BIO-101L-02
Human Biology Lab
Chen W
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-101 0.00
HAY 110
20
BIO-101L-03
Human Biology Lab
P. Garrett
TH
12:30PM - 04:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Co-Requisite: BIO-101 0.00
HAY 110
20
BIO-111-01
General Biology I
Bost A, Sorensen-Kamakian E, Chen W
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE Co-Requisite: BIO-111L 1.00
ATH FIELD
80 26 
BIO-111L-01
General Biol I Lab
Bost A
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Co-Requisite: BIO-111 0.00
HAY 111
20 12 
BIO-111L-02
General Biol I Lab
Bost A
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Co-Requisite: BIO-111 0.00
HAY 111
20
BIO-111L-03
General Biol I Lab
Sorensen-Kamakian E
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-111 0.00
HAY 111
20 11 
BIO-111L-04
General Biol I Lab
Sorensen-Kamakian E
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-111 0.00
HAY 111
20
BIO-211-01
Genetics
Burton P
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: BIO-112, Co-Requisite: BIO-211L 1.00
HAY 104
36
BIO-211L-01
Genetics Lab
Burton P
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-211, Prerequisite: BIO-112 0.00
HAY 214
20
BIO-211L-02
Genetics Lab
Burton P
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-211, Prerequisite: BIO-112 0.00
HAY 214
20
BIO-213-01
Ecology
P. Garrett
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: BIO-112, Co-Requisite: BIO-213L 1.00
HAY 319
16
BIO-213L-01
Ecology Lab
P. Garrett
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Co-Requisite: BIO-213, Prerequisite: BIO-112 0.00
HAY 103
16
BIO-221-01
Compar Anatomy & Embryology
Carlson B
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. Email Dr. Bradley Carlson to apply for this course. Prerequisite: BIO-112, Co-Requisite: BIO-221L 1.00
HAY 319
16
BIO-221-01D
Compar Anatomy & Embryology
Carlson B
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. Prerequisite: BIO-112, Co-Requisite: BIO-221L 1.00
TBA TBA
5
BIO-221L-01
Comp Anatomy & Embry Lab
Carlson B
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Email Dr. Bradley Carlson to apply for this course. Co-Requisite: BIO-221 0.00
HAY 103
16
BIO-221L-01D
Comp Anatomy & Embry Lab
Carlson B
M W F
TBA - TBA
Co-Requisite: BIO-221 0.00
TBA TBA
5
BIO-226-01
Parasitology
Wetzel E
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. Prerequisite: BIO-112, Co-Requisite: BIO-226L 1.00
HAY 002
14
BIO-226L-01
Parasitology Lab
Wetzel E
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-226, Prerequisite: BIO-112 0.00
HAY 101
16
BIO-316-01
Evolutn of Dvlpmntl Mechanisms
Burton P
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: BIO-211 1.00
HAY 001
10
BIO-316-01D
Evolutn of Dvlpmntl Mechanisms
Burton P
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. Prerequisite: BIO-211 1.00
TBA TBA
1
BIO-401-01
Senior Seminar
Sorensen-Kamakian E, Chen W
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
TBA TBA
10
BLS - BLACK STUDIES
BLS-201-01
Introduction to Black Studies
Lake T
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
MXI 214
25 22 
BLS-270-01
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE. Crosslisting: BLS-270-01=EDU-201-01=PPE-228-01 Prerequisite: ENG-101 1.00
TBA TBA
12 12 
BLS-270-02
Educational Policy & Eval
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. Crosslisting:BLS-270-02=EDU-240-01=PSC-201-01 Prerequisite: FRT-101 Freshman Tutorial 1.00
MXI 109
16 16 
BLS-270-03
Ss Ed for Democratic Citizen
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:15PM - 03:35PM
HYBRID COURSE. Crosslisting: BLS-270-03=HIS-240-02=EDU-250-01 1.00
MXI 214
6
BLS-270-04
Malcolm, Martin and Mandela
Thomas S
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HYBRID COURSE.HIS-240-01=BLS-270-04 This course considers the overlapping lives and legacies of Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr., and Nelson Mandela, three revolutionary figures whose influence on the fight for civil rights in America and Africa was profound and far reaching. Though the American public rarely imagined them as political bedfellows in their time, a closer inspection of their lives reveals striking autobiographical similarities and pan-African connections. Students will closely examine the convergences and confluences of their biographies, political ideologies, and activism while exploring broader issues including colonialism, civil disobedience, cultural resistance, social justice, and freedom. We will consider how their lives intersected in the transnational struggle for racial equality and how their legacies continue to shape contemporary debates about black identity and the continued crisis of American race relations? 1.00
MXI 109
16
BLS-400-01
Independent Study
Lake T
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
BUS - BUSINESS
BUS-400-01
Senior Capstone
Koppelmann Z, Howland F, Mikek P
TBA
TBA - TBA
VIRTUAL COURSE. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
CHE - CHEMISTRY
CHE-101-01
Survey of Chemistry
Cook T
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Co-Requisite: CHE-101L 1.00
BAX 202
20
CHE-101-02
Survey of Chemistry
Wysocki L
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Co-Requisite: CHE-101L 1.00
HAY 319
20
CHE-101L-01
Survey Chemistry Lab
Cook T
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-101 0.00
HAY 316
20
CHE-101L-02
Survey Chemistry Lab
Ross G
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
HYBRID COURSE Co-Requisite: CHE-101 0.00
HAY 316
20
CHE-106-01
Survey of Biochemistry
Taylor A
TU TH
08:00AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. Note that for the Fall 2020 section of CHE-106, the co-requisite of CHE-106L is integrated into the CHE-106 course registration. 1.00
HAY 316
20 -1 
CHE-111-01
General Chemistry I
Porter L
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Co-Requisite: CHE-111L 1.00
HFP TENT
18
CHE-111-01F
General Chemistry I
Porter L
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Co-Requisite: CHE-111L 1.00
HFP TENT
18 10 
CHE-111-02
General Chemistry I
Taylor A, Schmitt P
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Co-Requisite: CHE-111L 1.00
FIN BALL
39
CHE-111L-01
General Chemistry Lab
Taylor A
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111 0.00
HAY 315
20
CHE-111L-01F
General Chemistry Lab
Taylor A
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111 0.00
HAY 315
7
CHE-111L-02
General Chemistry Lab
Porter L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111 0.00
HAY 315
14
CHE-111L-02F
General Chemistry Lab
Porter L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111 0.00
HAY 315
4 -1 
CHE-111L-03
General Chemistry Lab
Schmitt P
TH
08:00AM - 11:00AM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111 0.00
HAY 315
20
CHE-111L-04
General Chemistry Lab
Porter L
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111 0.00
TBA TBA
14
CHE-111L-04F
General Chemistry Lab
Porter L
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111 0.00
TBA TBA
7
CHE-221-01
Organic Chemistry I
Wysocki L, Novak W
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: CHE-111, Co-Requisite: CHE-221L 1.00
HAY 104
36
CHE-221-01D
Organic Chemistry I
Wysocki L, Novak W
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
VIRTUAL COURSE Prerequisite: CHE-111, Co-Requisite: CHE-221L 1.00
TBA TBA
1
CHE-221L-01
Organic Chem I Lab
Wysocki L
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-221, Prerequisite: CHE-111 0.00
HAY 314
16
CHE-221L-02
Organic Chem I Lab
Wysocki L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-221, Prerequisite: CHE-111 0.00
HAY 314
10
CHE-221L-03
Organic Chem I Lab
Cook T
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-221, Prerequisite: CHE-111 0.00
HAY 314
16
CHE-221L-04
Organic Chem I Lab
Novak W
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-221, Prerequisite: CHE-111 0.00
HAY 314
9
CHE-221L-05D
Organic Chem I Lab
Wysocki L
TBA
TBA - TBA
VIRTUAL COURSE Co-Requisite: CHE-221, Prerequisite: CHE-111 0.00
TBA TBA
1
CHE-351-01
Physical Chem I
Schmitt P
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisites: CHE-241 and MAT-112, Co-Requisite: CHE-351L 1.00
HAY 319
15
CHE-351L-01
Physical Chem I Lab
Schmitt P
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-351, Prerequisites: CHE-241 and MAT-112 0.00
HAY 202
11 -1 
CHE-441-03
Organometallic Chemistry
Cook T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. This course will delve more deeply into concepts introduced in CHE-241, emphasizing the applications of structural principles, kinetics, and thermodynamics to modern organometallic systems. Through digestion of recently published literature, we will identify and discuss common motifs that garner the majority of research interest within the field. Anaerobic techniques for preparing and characterizing air-sensitive complexes will be introduced, though there will be no scheduled weekly laboratory period. This one-half credit course meets twice a week for the first half of the semester. Prerequisites: CHE-241 0.50
HAY 002
14
CHE-441-04
Electrochemistry
Cook T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Building on principles of oxidation-reduction reactions discussed in first-year chemistry courses, this course offers an in-depth exploration of the theory and analytical techniques that underpin modern investigations into electron transfer behavior and its applications. Topics include: solution-phase electrochemistry, electrocatalysis, solid-state devices (batteries), photovoltaic materials, and electrochemical methods for quantitation of certain analytes. This one-half credit course meets twice a week for the second half of the semester. Prerequisites: CHE-241 0.50
HAY 002
14 10 
CHE-461-01
Adv. Topics in Biochemistry
Novak W
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. This course will build on basic biochemical principles and apply them to protein structure. Topics include: protein crystallization, X-ray diffraction, building protein structures into electron density, and a survey of protein design. Students will learn to build, assess, and correct problematic protein structures. This one-half credit course meets twice a week for the second half of the semester. Prerequisites: CHE-361 0.50
HAY 319
15 10 
CHE-462-01
Biochemistry II
Novak W
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
HYBRID COURSE. Prerequisite: CHE-361 0.50
HAY 319
15 11 
CHI - CHINESE
CHI-101-01
Elementary Chinese I
Li Y
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Co-Requisite: CHI-101L 1.00
DET 112
7
CHI-101-01F
Elementary Chinese I
Li Y
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Co-Requisite: CHI-101L 1.00
DET 112
5
CHI-101L-01
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
M
03:20PM - 04:10PM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101 0.00
CEN 215
5
CHI-101L-02
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
TU
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101 0.00
DET 211
5
CHI-101L-03
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
TU
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101 0.00
GOO 006
5
CHI-101L-04
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101 0.00
DET 211
5
CHI-201-01
Intermediate Chinese I
Li Y
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: CHI-102, or CHI-201 placement., Co-requisite: CHI-201L 1.00
DET 112
10
CHI-201L-01
Intermediate Chinese I Lab
Staff
W
03:20PM - 04:10PM
Co-requisite: CHI-201, Prerequisite: CHI-102, or CHI-201 placement 0.00
DET 211
5
CHI-201L-02
Intermediate Chinese I Lab
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-requisite: CHI-201, Prerequisite: CHI-102, or CHI-201 placement 0.00
DET 112
5
CHI-301-01
Conversation & Composition
Li Y
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: CHI-202, or CHI-301 placement. 1.00
CEN 304
5
CLA - CLASSICS
CLA-101-01
Classical Mythology
Gorey M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
FIN CONC
54 16 
CLA-101-01F
Classical Mythology
Gorey M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
FIN CONC
13
CLA-112-01
Houses & Society in Anc World
Hartnett J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. CLA-112-01=HIS-220-01 Pompeii's gritty streets, humble shacks in the Greek countryside, over-the-top villas of Rome's emperors - inhabitants of the ancient Mediterranean dwelled in all manner of different places and fashions. How did these "houses" reflect Greek and Roman life? Who lived in them? How were they organized and decorated? And how did the built environment shape interaction among inhabitants as well as between them and "outsiders?" This class will entertain these questions by blending readings from primary sources with analysis of archaeological remains. A chief goal is to introduce students to the basics of social history as we consider social structure, cultural values, domestic space, and the relationships among them. Key themes include gender, status, childhood, slavery, religion, and law. In addition, non-ancient houses and households - such as a Frank Lloyd Wright house in West Lafayette as well as Wabash dorms and fraternity houses - will offer comparative material and provide the opportunity for further exploration of modern conceptions of house and family. 1.00
FIN CONC
24
CLA-112-01F
Houses and Society Ancient Wld
Hartnett J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. CLA-112-01=CLA-112-01F=HIS-220-01=HIS220-01F Pompeii's gritty streets, humble shacks in the Greek countryside, over-the-top villas of Rome's emperors - inhabitants of the ancient Mediterranean dwelled in all manner of different places and fashions. How did these "houses" reflect Greek and Roman life? Who lived in them? How were they organized and decorated? And how did the built environment shape interaction among inhabitants as well as between them and "outsiders?" This class will entertain these questions by blending readings from primary sources with analysis of archaeological remains. A chief goal is to introduce students to the basics of social history as we consider social structure, cultural values, domestic space, and the relationships among them. Key themes include gender, status, childhood, slavery, religion, and law. In addition, non-ancient houses and households - such as a Frank Lloyd Wright house in West Lafayette as well as Wabash dorms and fraternity houses - will offer comparative material and provide the opportunity for further exploration of modern conceptions of house and family. 1.00
FIN CONC
8
CLA-211-01
Sp. Topics: Virgil's Aeneid
Kubiak D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE CLA-211-01=ENG-270-01 This class will be an intensive literary and historical study of Virgil's epic the Aeneid, which after the Bible has been the most consistently influential book in the western canon. The poem will be read in translation, but the class is also intended for students of Latin who have not been able to read extensively in the original text. We will examine the literary traditions in which the Aeneid stands, Virgil's very particular aesthetic orientation, and the historical and cultural developments in Rome that influenced the composition of the poem. Explication of the text itself will be the main focus of the course, but there will also be readings from modern scholars representing different interpretative approaches. Finally, we will take up the question of the Aeneid's influence in later European literature, and will read the Inferno of Dante's Divina Commedia entire. 1.00
DET 209
21
CLA-220-01
Classical Rhetoric
Geraths C
TU TH
07:30PM - 08:45PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. RHE-320-01 = CLA-220-01 1.00
GOO 104
16 16 
CLA-240-01
Ancient Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. CLA-240=PHI-240 1.00
HAY 104
30 22 
COL - COLLOQUIUM
COL-401-01
Important Books: Sr Colloquium
Blix D, Howland F
W
07:30PM - 09:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
DET 209
15
CSC - COMPUTER SCIENCE
CSC-101-01
Intro to Computer Science
McKinney C
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
GOO 104
7
CSC-101-01D
Intro to Computer Science
McKinney C
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. 1.00
TBA TBA
3 -1 
CSC-101-01F
Intro to Computer Science
McKinney C
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
GOO 104
15
CSC-111-01
Intro to Programming
Turner W
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisite: CSC-101 or MAT 112; or permission of the instructor 1.00
HAY 003
23
CSC-111-01D
Intro to Programming
Turner W
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
VIRTUAL COURSE Prerequisite: CSC-101 or MAT 112; or permission of the instructor 1.00
TBA TBA
2 -1 
CSC-211-01
Intro to Data Structures
Westphal C
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: CSC-111 with a minimum grade of C-. 1.00
GOO 101
12
CSC-211-01D
Intro to Data Structures
Westphal C
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. Prerequisite: CSC-111 with a minimum grade of C-. 1.00
TBA TBA
2 -1 
CSC-241-01
Intro to Machine Organization
McKinney C
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: CSC-211, or permission of the instructor 1.00
GOO 104
24 12 
CSC-241-01D
Intro to Machine Organization
McKinney C
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. Prerequisite: CSC-211, or permission of the instructor 1.00
TBA TBA
1 -1 
CSC-244-01
Theory of Computing
McCartin-Lim M
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: CSC-111 with a minimum grade of C-; either MAT-108 or MAT-219 with a minimum grade of C- 1.00
CEN 216
8
CSC-337-01
Introduc to Numerical Analysis
Westphal C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE.MAT-337.01=CSC-337.01 Prerequisites: CSC-111 and MAT-223 1.00
GOO 101
24 20 
CSC-337-01D
Introduc to Numerical Analysis
Westphal C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. Prerequisites: CSC-111 and MAT-223 1.00
TBA TBA
1
CSC-400-01
Senior Capstone
McCartin-Lim M
TU TH
04:15PM - 05:15PM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisite: CSC-211 with a minimum grade of C- 1.00
CEN 216
 
DV3 - DIVISION III
DV3-252-01
Stats Soc Sciences
Howland F
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. 0.50
HAY 003
23
DV3-252-02
Stats Soc Sciences
Howland F
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. 0.50
BAX 214
15
DV3-252-02D
Stats Soc Sciences
Howland F
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. 0.50
TBA TBA
5
ECO - ECONOMICS
ECO-101-01
Principles of Economics
Saha S
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
GOO 104
25
ECO-101-02
Principles of Economics
Snow N
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
LIB GOODRICH
25
ECO-101-03
Principles of Economics
Burnette J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
HAY 104
25
ECO-101-04D
Principles of Economics
Dunaway E
M W F
07:00AM - 07:50AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. 1.00
TBA TBA
20
ECO-220-01
The Global Economy
Saha S
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE. ECO220-01=ASI277-01=PPE256-01 The goal of this course is to offer an overview of different aspects of the global economy. It provides a basic understanding of the fundamental theories of international economics including both international trade and international finance, with regard to the historical and institutional contexts in which the U.S. economy operates, and to broaden the understanding of other economies by studying their policy problems within the analytical framework of international economics. With globalization, an economy cannot be treated individually, and so it is important to know how differences in location can make economic activities easier. This course has two parts: the first part will focus on topics on international trade such as, trade theories, trade policies and impacts of international trade on the environment. The second part of this course will concentrate on topics on international finance such as, balance of payments, exchange rates, regional issues in global economy, etc. This course explores the economic fundamentals regarding the dynamics of global economy, and how to relate it to the current, global and real-world scenarios in terms of economic, social, and political interactions. Prerequisite: ECO-101 1.00
GOO 104
25 11 
ECO-224-01
Econom & Political Development
Burnette J
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE ECO-224-01 = GHL-224-01 = PPE-264-01 Prerequisite: ECO-101 1.00
HAY 319
24
ECO-251-01
Economic Approach With Excel
Howland F
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRUTAL COURSE. This is a second half semester course. Prerequisite: ECO-101 0.50
HAY 003
23
ECO-251-02
Economic Approach With Excel
Howland F
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. This is a second half semester course. Prerequisite: ECO-101 0.50
BAX 214
15
ECO-251-02D
Economic Approach With Excel
Howland F
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. Prerequisite: ECO-101 0.50
TBA TBA
5
ECO-253-01
Intro to Econometrics
Howland F
TBA
TBA - TBA
VIRTUAL COURSE. ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C-., MAT-110 or MAT-111 with a minimum grade of C-., DV3-252, or PSC-297, or MAT-253 and 353, or PSY-201 and 202. For any prerequisite course(s), a minimum grade of C- is required. 1.00
TBA TBA
1
ECO-277-01
Behavioral Economics
Dunaway E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. Behavioral Economics, a relatively new field in economic theory, attempts to bridge the divide between the classical microeconomic model and what we observe in the real world. In this class, we will explore concepts like mental accounting (or why my bank account never seems to have as much money in it as I remember), hyperbolic discounting (or why I keep hitting the snooze button on my alarm clock), reciprocity (or why I charge less to people I know better), and prospect theory (or why I weigh my fear of getting a C on an exam much more than my joy of getting an A on it), among other topics. Prerequisite: ECO-101 1.00
BAX 101
25
ECO-277-02
Political Eco & Entreprenure
Snow N
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: ECO-101 1.00
TBA TBA
1
ECO-277-03
Topics in Econ. of Lat Am
Mikek P
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: ECO-101 1.00
TBA TBA
2
ECO-277-04
International Trade: Vietnam
Mikek P
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: ECO-101 0.50
TBA TBA
1
ECO-291-02
Intermediate Micro
Dunaway E
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. Prerequisites: ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C-, and MAT-110 or 111 with a minimum grade of C-. 1.00
HAY 003
20 -2 
ECO-291-02D
Intermediate Micro
Dunaway E
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. Prerequisites: ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C-, and MAT-110 or 111 with a minimum grade of C-. 1.00
TBA TBA
1 -3 
ECO-292-01
Intermediate Macro
Mikek P
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisites: ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C-, and MAT-110 or 111 with a minimum grade of C-. 1.00
FIN CONC
30
ECO-292-01D
Intermediate Macro
Mikek P
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
VIRTUAL Prerequisites: ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C-, and MAT-110 or 111 with a minimum grade of C-. 1.00
TBA TBA
1
ECO-361-01
Corporate Finance
Howland F
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. Prerequisites: ECO-251, ECO-253, and ECO-291 1.00
TBA TBA
25
ECO-361-01D
Corporate Finance
Howland F
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. Prerequisites: ECO-251, ECO-253, and ECO-291 1.00
TBA TBA
5
ECO-362-01
Money and Banking
Mikek P
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisites: ECO-253 with a minimum grade of C-, and ECO-292 with a minimum grade of C-. 1.00
BAX 202
20
ECO-362-01D
Money and Banking
Mikek P
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
VIRTUAL COURSE Prerequisites: ECO-253 with a minimum grade of C-, and ECO-292 with a minimum grade of C-. 1.00
TBA TBA
5
ECO-401-01
Senior Seminar
Saha S
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. Prerequisite: ECO-251, A minimum grade of C- in ECO-253, ECO-291, and ECO-292 1.00
BAX 202
16
ECO-401-02
Senior Seminar
Mikek P
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisite: ECO-251, A minimum grade of C- in ECO-253, ECO-291, and ECO-292 1.00
BAX 212
14
EDU - EDUCATION
EDU-101-01
Intro Child & Adolescent Devel
Pittard M
M W
02:15PM - 03:35PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
DET 209
12
EDU-101-01F
Intro Child & Adolescent Devel
Pittard M
M W
02:15PM - 03:35PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
DET 209
6
EDU-201-01
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE. Crosslisting: EDU-201-01= PPE-228-01=BLS-270-01 Prerequiste: ENG-101 1.00
MXI 213
12
EDU-203-01
Adolescent Literacy Devel
Pittard M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
BAX 202
18
EDU-240-01
Educational Policy & Eval
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. Crosslisting: EDU-240-01=BLS-270-02=PSC-210-01 Prerequisite: FRT-101 Freshman Tutorial 1.00
MXI 109
16
EDU-250-01
Ss Ed for Democratic Citizen
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:15PM - 03:35PM
HYBRID COURSE. Crossliting: EDU-250-01=BLS-270-03=HIS-240-02 1.00
MXI 214
6
ENG - ENGLISH
ENG-101-01
Composition
Benedicks C
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
CEN 216
15
ENG-101-02
Composition
Freeze E
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
CEN 215
15
ENG-101-03
Composition
Mong D
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
CEN 215
15
ENG-101-04
Composition
Pavlinich E
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
CEN 215
15
ENG-101-05
Composition
Whitney J
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
MXI 109
15
ENG-101-06
Composition
Lamberton J
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
1.00
CEN 216
15
ENG-101-07D
Composition
Benedicks C
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
VITURAL COURSE 1.00
TBA TBA
15 10 
ENG-105-01
Intro to Poetry
Whitney J
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
HYBRID COURSE. 0.50
LIB GOODRICH
30 14 
ENG-106-01
Intro. to Short Fiction
Whitney J
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
HYBRID COURSE 0.50
LIB GOODRICH
30 17 
ENG-110-01
Intro to Creative Writing
Mong D
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
DET 209
13
ENG-110-01F
Intro to Creative Writing
Mong D
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
DET 209
7
ENG-180-01
Medieval Magic/Modern Monsters
Pavlinich E
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. Once upon a time, fairies made public beheadings a noble sport while dragons terrorized the humans of Middle Earth. Although we tend to look down on the Middle Ages from our modern perspectives, contemporary audiences continue to enjoy medieval narratives retold through books and films such as Harry Potter, television adaptations such as Game of Thrones, and video games such as The Legend of Zelda. We will travel back and forth through time, analyzing both medieval texts and modern representations of the Middle Ages, including riddles, poetry, graphic novels, and short films. ENG-180-01 cross list with GEN-270-03 1.00
FIN CONC
20
ENG-180-01F
Medieval Magic/Modern Monsters
Pavlinich E
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. Once upon a time, fairies made public beheadings a noble sport while dragons terrorized the humans of Middle Earth. Although we tend to look down on the Middle Ages from our modern perspectives, contemporary audiences continue to enjoy medieval narratives retold through books and films such as Harry Potter,television adaptations such as Game of Thrones, and video gamessuch as The Legend of Zelda. We will travel back and forth time, analyzing both medieval texts and modernrepresentations of the Middle Ages, including riddles, poetry, graphic novels, and short films. ENG-180-01 cross list with GEN-270-03 1.00
FIN CONC
5
ENG-202-03
Writing With Power and Grace
Whitney J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
DET 212
12
ENG-213-01
Creative Writ: Short Fiction
Freeze E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: ENG-110 or permission of the instructor 1.00
CEN 215
15 11 
ENG-219-01
Amer Lit before 1900
Mong D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
BAX 202
10
ENG-219-01F
Amer Lit before 1900
Mong D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
BAX 202
10
ENG-260-01
Introduction to Black Studies
Lake T
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. BLS-201.01=ENG-260.01 1.00
MXI 214
25 24 
ENG-270-01
Sp. Topics: Virgil' S Aeneid
Kubiak D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE CLA211-01=ENG270-01 This class will be an intensive literary and historical study of Virgil's epic the Aeneid, which after the Bible has been the most consistently influential book in the western canon. The poem will be read in translation, but the class is also intended for students of Latin who have not been able to read extensively in the original text. We will examine the literary traditions in which the Aeneid stands, Virgil's very particular aesthetic orientation, and the historical and cultural developments in Rome that influenced the composition of the poem. Explication of the text itself will be the main focus of the course, but there will also be readings from modern scholars representing different interpretative approaches. Finally, we will take up the question of the Aeneid's influence in later European literature, and will read the Inferno of Dante's Divina Commedia entire. 1.00
DET 209
21 16 
ENG-297-01
Intro to the Study of Lit
Brewer A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
VIRTUAL COURSE 1.00
DET 209
20
ENG-310-01
The Classic Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE THE-215-01=ENG-310-01 This course will focus on the theater history and dramatic literature between the golden age of classical Greek drama and the revolutionary theater of Romantic period: 2,000 years of theater in one semester. We will study representative plays of various periods and genres-the "old" comedies of the Greeks, the morality plays of medieval Europe, the tragedies of Shakespeare and his contemporaries-while also considering how the plays reflect the moral, social, and political issues of their time. This course is appropriate for all students, regardless of artistic background. 1 credit from ENG at Wabash. 1.00
FIN M120
15 11 
ENG-311-01
Adv Wrkshp in Crea. Nonfiction
Freeze E
TBA
TBA - TBA
ENG-211 1.00
TBA TBA
1
ENG-314-01D
Theory & Prac of Peer Tutoring
Koppelmann Z
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. Prerequisite: FRT-101 Freshman Tutorial and FRC-101 Enduring Questions 1.00
CEN 304
7
ENG-370-01
Extraordinary Bodies
Benedicks C
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE ENG-370-01=GEN-270-02 What happens when stories and theories represent bodies that aren't "normal"? In this class, we will read narratives by disabled people as well as study theories of disability to try to understand how physical difference challenges traditional viewsF of gender, culture, writing, space, and time. 1.00
CEN 215
15
ENG-411-01
Bus & Tech Writing
Pavlinich E
TU TH
07:30PM - 08:45PM
HYBRID COURSE. This course will fulfill a requirement for the Business Minor Prerequisite: FRC-101 Enduring Questions, and junior or senior standing 1.00
CEN 216
16
ENG-497-01
Domestic Space
Freeze E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE ENG497-01 This course examines James Baldwin's depictions of domestic space over the last seventeen years of his life in St. Paul de Vence, France. Works such as If Beale Street Could Talk, No Name in the Street, and his unpublished play The Welcome Table reveal an artist ahead of his time who was heavily influenced by African American women writers such as Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, and Paule Marshall. Parallel concerns-depiction of African American women, a valuing of domestic space, and reactions against heteronormative male-centered politics in the Black Arts and Black Power movements-permeate Baldwin's work. We will also examine how Baldwin's physical home, a Provençale farm house and outbuildings which were recently razed by developers, affected his depictions of domestic space. To do this, we will rely on the digital museum Chez Baldwin, curated by the Smithsonian, interviews with writers and locals, and the French nonprofitLa Maison Baldwin which is dedicated to preserving the legacy of James Baldwin in southern France. 1.00
DET 112
12
ENG-497-01D
Seminar in English Lit
Freeze E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL 1.00
TBA TBA
1
ENG-498-01
Capstone Portfolio
Mong D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. On Tuesdays this class will meet in the Caleb Mills Courtyard. Prerequisite: ENG-311, ENG-312, or ENG-313 0.50
CEN 215
10
ENG-498-02
Capstone Portfolio
Mong D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: ENG-311, ENG-312, or ENG-313 0.50
CEN 215
10 10 
FRE - FRENCH
FRE-101-01
Elementary French I
Pouille A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Co-requisite: FRE-101L 1.00
LIB GOODRICH
22
FRE-101L-01
Elementary French 1 Lab
L. Merpaux
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-101 0.00
DET 211
6
FRE-101L-02
Elementary French 1 Lab
L. Merpaux
M
03:20PM - 04:10PM
Co-requisite: FRE-101 0.00
DET 211
6
FRE-101L-03
Elementary French 1 Lab
L. Merpaux
TU
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-101 0.00
DET 112
6
FRE-101L-04
Elementary French 1 Lab
L. Merpaux
TU
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Co-requisite: FRE-101 0.00
DET 111
6
FRE-201-01
Intermediate French
Pouille A
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: FRE-102, or FRE-201 placement, Co-requisite: FRE-201L 1.00
DET 109
18
FRE-201-01D
Intermediate French
Pouille A
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
VIRTUAL COURSE Prerequisite: FRE-102, or FRE-201 placement, Co-requisite: FRE-201L 1.00
TBA TBA
1
FRE-201L-01
Intermediate French Lab.
L. Merpaux
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-201 0.00
DET 211
7
FRE-201L-02
Intermediate French Lab.
L. Merpaux
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-201 0.00
DET 212
7
FRE-201L-02D
Intermediate French Lab.
L. Merpaux
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-201 0.00
TBA TBA
1
FRE-201L-03
Intermediate French Lab.
L. Merpaux
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-201 0.00
DET 211
6
FRE-301-01
Conversation & Composition
Quandt K
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisite: FRE-202, or FRE-301 placement 1.00
CEN 305
10
FRE-312-01
Studies in French Culture
Quandt K
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE FRE312-01 This course will consider major literary and artistic movements in France spanning from Romanticism to World War I. Considering short stories, novels, and poems from key writers (such as Chateaubriand, Baudelaire, Zola, and Breton) who shaped modernism, we will trace the major motifs in literature and art that arose in response to revolution, empire, industrialization, urbanization, and war. Throughout, we will concentrate on French writers and poets who were also art critics and theorists; painters who called themselves poets; poets who were also painters; and musicians who translated the language of poetry into song. Along with readings, images in a variety of media (paintings, drawings, sculpture), as well as musical excerpts, will be integral to class discussion. Course taught in French. PreReq FRE-301 and FRE-302 1.00
CEN 305
7
FRT - FRESHMAN TUTORIALS
FRT-101-01
Sports and the Law
Tanney M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. FRT-101-01: Sports and The Law: Mascots, Money, and Monopolies Matt Tanney '05 is Director of Athletics and Campus Wellness, and returned to Wabash in 2018. He previously worked in several NCAA Division I athletics departments, including The Ohio State University and the University of Oklahoma. Tanney earned his Juris Doctor at Indiana University's McKinney School of Law. He resides in Crawfordsville with his wife Julia and twin daughters. The course explores complicated cultural issues through the lens of sports and the law, such as multi-million-dollar athletics departments on college campuses, the evolution of gender equality in society through athletics participation, and current legal sports issues in the headlines. Should elite college athletes receive compensation for their name, image, and likeness? How do we define amateurism? Does legalized sports wagering affect the integrity of the game? The class will travel to the NCAA National Office in Indianapolis during the semester. 1.00
ATH CLASS
16
FRT-101-02
Reading Green
Quandt K
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE FRT-101-02: Reading Green: Literature and The Environment Karen Quandt teaches French in the Department of Modern Languages. She is a voracious reader who studies art in all of its forms: poetry, painting, music.you name it! She is an amateur bird watcher and enjoys visiting trails and parks with her husband and their two young boys. She loves to travel and experience new locales, but she knows that her favorite place will always be Paris! The scope of this course emulates Charles Darwin's "tree of life" as it proposes to explore a network of texts across time and place (primarily in the Western canon) that are all rooted in a profound questioning of the human relationship to nature. Is there an unbridgeable gap between humans and nature? Do we have the right to interfere with nature's processes? Have industry and technology rendered nature completely alien to us? Literature is a unique meeting place of the natural environment and the creative imagination that allows us to explore these challenging questions. Examining the legacy of myth in our understanding of nature, the cultural impact of science and industry, the environmental catastrophes that result from nuclear power and warfare, as well as dystopian visions of a world rid of nature, we will consider how literature from all periods and places calls us to reexamine how we interact with and treat the earth. In certain instances, we will read excerpts of non-fiction and consider how nature or cataclysmic assaults on nature inspire the human imagination toward the poetic or fictional. Readings will be supplemented by relevant articles or news pieces that address contemporary environmental concerns, and films will also be included. 1.00
TRIP 123
15
FRT-101-03
God, Human Limits, Things That
Nelson D
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. FRT-101-03: God, Human Limits, and Things That Matter Steve Bowen practiced law for 42 years and has been a trustee of Wabash College for the last 23 years. He graduated from Wabash in 1968. Derek Nelson is a religion professor, meat smoker, and mortise-and-tenon furniture aficionado who loves to read. He is also a pastor, dad, husband, and a rather lousy golfer. Nothing is forever, and not everything is possible. Limits exist and cannot be ignored without (potentially grave) consequences. In this seminar, we will consider important questions that confront us in our daily lives, and to which we must respond: "Are we as free as we think we are." "In what or in whom should we put our trust?" "What is worth loving or desiring?" "What do we dare hope for?" "Does the idea of God (or the infinite) cohere with the limits of human knowledge, and if so, how?" We will explore these questions through fiction, film, theological and philosophical texts, and other essays. 1.00
CEN 216
16
FRT-101-04
Overcoming Our Greatest Challe
Himsel S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. FRT-101-04: Overcoming Our Greatest Challenges:Lessons from Abraham Lincoln, the Civil War, and Reconstruction Scott Himsel is a lawyer who teaches political science and loves hearing both sides of a good argument. How do we respond to challenges that threaten our very existence? Do we learn our lessons or repeat our mistakes? The Civil War was such a threat. Over 750,000 soldiers died; it was our bloodiest war. Those who amended the Constitution during Reconstruction struggled mightily to solve the problems that caused the war. But some problems of that era still haunt us today, including racism, terrorist violence, intense disputes about government power, and disease (which killed twice as many soldiers as combat). Even though other issues we currently face - abortion, gay rights, affirmative action - did not capture national attention until after this era, we use the constitutional amendments ratified during Reconstruction to resolve them today. Studying the Civil War and Reconstruction-era roots of our current problems will better equip us to help solve them. We will also learn how some of America's most legendary leaders - Lincoln, General Ulysses S. Grant, the abolitionist and former slave Frederick Douglass, and those who shaped the Reconstruction-era constitutional amendments - helped their deeply divided fellow citizens respond to great challenges. We also face many great challenges today. We have much to learn. And some of the lessons may surprise you. 1.00
BAX 114
16
FRT-101-05
Rebel Without a Pulse
Porter L
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. FRT-101-05: Rebel Without a Pulse: Life Lessons from The Undead Lon Porter teaches chemistry, 3D printing, and enjoys working with students in his research lab. If you visit his office, you'll discover he is a big Star Wars, Transformers, and Marvel fan. When not watching science fiction films and series, he loves his role as faculty mentor to the Wabash tabletop gaming club. You'll often find him playing Warhammer 40k, Magic: The Gathering, and just about any board game he can find. The undead have once again shambled into a prominent place in popular culture and contemporary fiction. This course will focus on the origins and evolution of the undead in folklore, literature, popular art, games, and film. Students will explore a number of readings and films that portray the undead in a variety of ways. We will uncover how undead fiction addresses the mystique, power, and fear associated with the supernatural, science, authority, disease, morality, sex, and violence. Critical discussion of these fictional works will reveal a great deal about ourselves and the hopes and fears of society. The course will challenge students to dig deep and use their "braaaaaainsss" as they tackle engaging stories about zombies, vampires, ghouls, etc. Students will explore several examples of the undead in short stories, novels, films, and games in order to identify defining characteristics, while revealing and deconstructing the social commentary and themes central to each work. Course assignments and activities are aimed to help students develop critical reading, writing, discussion, and oral presentation skills that are essential to success at Wabash College. As a final assignment, students will work to craft original short stories that will be compiled into a publication to share with classmates. Other activities may include a field trip to Hanna Haunted Acres, located in Indianapolis, and a local Halloween haunted house community service project. Interested students should expect to work hard, be rewarded for creativity, take on significant reading assignments, and engage in daily class discussions and writing exercises. Examples of undead fiction we will explore include, but are not limited to: (Readings) Richard Matheson's, I am Legend, Max Brooks', World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War, Bram Stoker's, Dracula, and various short stories; (Films/TV) Daybreakers (2010), 30 Days of Night (2008), Shaun of the Dead (2004), 28 Days Later (2003), and episodes of The Walking Dead (2010-2020) and True Blood (2009-2014); (Games) the Dead Rising series, Left for Dead series, Dying Light, and Last Night on Earth. 1.00
FIN CONC
15
FRT-101-06
Me, My Self, and My Brain
Schmitzer-Torbert N
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. FRT-101-06: Me, My Self, and My Brain Neil Schmitzer-Torbert teaches psychology/neuroscience, and enjoys science fiction and graphic novels. Imagine you've created a machine that is able to make an exact, physical copy of any object. However, the process of making the copy requires that the machine destroys the original. So, if you put your phone in and turn on the machine, the phone is instantly vaporized. But, in another compartment you find an exact duplicate of your device. Such a machine would be quite interesting, but we might imagine that it has little practical value. However, what happens if you step into the machine, and turn it on? You are instantly (and, let's assume painlessly!) vaporized, and out of the second compartment steps your exact duplicate. Who is this duplicate? Does he think he is you? If he does, then are you actually dead? What if the machine malfunctions and you are not vaporized: are you and your duplicate both "you"? If you then kill your duplicate, was there in fact a murder? What if he kills you? In this class, we will take these types of thought experiments seriously, and use them to look carefully at the problem of self, and what it means to be a person. Through works of science fiction, philosophical thought experiments, and stories about the lives of humans with brain damage, we will try to locate our "I", our sense of self. We will also look at how gender, sexuality and other accidental facets of ourselves impact our personal identity. Finally, we will look beyond our own selves to examine other kinds of persons, such as aliens, artificial intelligences and genetically modified humans, who we might share the world with someday. Some of the texts we will read include Brok's Into the Silent Land, selections from philosophical approaches to the self, and a number of science fiction short stories and novels (such as The Mote in God's Eye and Ancillary Justice), and watch several films in the course, including The Thirteenth Floor and Arrival. Throughout the course, we will look at the state of current research, to better assess which science fiction futures are likely to become reality in our lifetimes. 1.00
FIN BALL
15
FRT-101-07
Dream Big
McCartin-Lim M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE FRT-101-07: Dream Big: The Story of Entrepreneurship in Computing Mark McCartin-Lim is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science who has taught at Wabash College since 2019. He grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, and has been enamored with the magic of computers since he first discovered his dad's Osborne II at age 6. Do you have what it takes to follow in the footsteps of Alan Turing, Charles Babbage, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg? These are just some of the names of computing pioneers whose visions have shaped the Information Age. In this tutorial, we will take a journey through time, to learn of the ambitions of these entrepreneurs, the ideas they had, and the decisions they made. Some decisions led to empires of enormous wealth, while others led to ruin. Our reflections will not only explain how the technology we taken for granted came into being, but also provide insights into how we might shape the future of computing. 1.00
HAY 003
16
FRT-101-08
Walk Like an (Ancient) Egypti
Snow N
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. FRT-101-08: Walk Like An (Ancient) Egyptian: A Social Science Deep Dive Nicholas Snow teaches economics and Philosophy, Political science and Economics and Wabash College. He enjoys garage rock, reading, playing guitar, and watching movies. The ancient Egyptians were one of the first major civilizations in human history and one of the most stable having consisted in a relatively stable state, with ups and downs, for nearly 3,000 years. Just to give a little perspective, Cleopatra's birth, for one example, was closer to the building of the first Pizza Hut (Wichita Kansas 1958) than to the great pyramids! The Egyptians have left the modern world with a lot to admire and to puzzle over (why did Egypt develop along the Nile?; How were the pyramids built?; etc.)! This tutorial will take an interdisciplinary approach to studying this fascinating culture using tools from economics, political science, philosophy, anthropology, archeology, and other sciences to intriguing questions related to this famous ancient civilization! 1.00
FIN EXP
15
FRT-101-09
Odyssey
Wickkiser B
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. FRT-101-09: Odyssey Bronwen Wickkiser teaches courses about ancient Greek history and culture and the impact of ancient Greece on our world today (From Zeus to Zika: A History of Epidemic Disease, and Troy Story, are two of her most popular). If you take her Tutorial on the Odyssey, you'll visit the Indianapolis Rowing Center and learn how to row like the ancients did. Climb aboard to read Homer's Odyssey, an epic tale about the warrior Odysseus who fought for ten years at Troy and then spent another ten years trying to return home. What compels a man to leave his wife and son to fight a war that he doesn't believe is entirely just? What sustains him when the voyage home, plagued by monsters and magic, takes another ten years? What values motivate him? is he a hero? And can Odysseus reunite happily with his wife and teenage son, who was an infant when he left for war? It's a story that has enthralled audiences for millennia. We'll investigate why by discussing, debating, creating, and writing. As we read, we'll explore topics like leadership, identity, masculinity, warfare, piety, and family values in antiquity and today. We'll also take detours, like learning to row a trireme, analyzing a Hollywood spin on the epic, and talking with a US veteran about his experiences setting off for war and returning from combat. Along the way, you will hone your analytical skills and acquire a deep knowledge of one of the world's greatest works of literature. It'll be epic! 1.00
DET 109
15
FRT-101-10
Why Trust Science?
Tompkins N
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE FRT-101-10: Why Trust Science? - What Do We Know, and How Do We Know It? Nate Tompkins is a physicist who specializes in pattern formation to answer questions such as: How did the leopard get its spots? Other interests include teaching how devices used every day function, music, theater, and musical theater. Do you trust Science? Why do you trust Science? What does it mean to trust Science? In this tutorial we will examine the process of science, several fundamental scientific theories, and the evidence supporting those theories. For example, ask yourself this: Do you believe the Earth revolves around the Sun? Why? This tutorial will evaluate some of the biggest scientific questions by looking at them through different lenses (books, graphic novels, movies, and even a play). We will learn the basics of various scientific topics ranging from the Big Bang to vaccines. Other topics will include: plate tectonics, evolution, special relativity, quantum mechanics, climate change, phlogiston, and more! If you like Science, the history of discoveries, and always find yourself asking "Why?" then this tutorial is for you. 1.00
CEN 215
15
FRT-101-11
Water and Public Health
Bost A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE FRT-101-11: Water and Public Health: All Hands on Deck Anne Bost is a microbiologist and an active member of Wabash's Global Health Initiative. She enjoys lively conversations, research, music, reading, dogs, anything outdoors, and ice cream. In 2019 the World Health Organization reported that 1 out of 3 people globally lack safe drinking water. How did this disparity of Water Haves and Have Nots come to be? How is water access changing with climate change? What are the impacts on human health? How can you make a difference? In our tutorial, we will contemplate the intricate historical and modern linkages between human health and sociopolitical, economic, and cultural development. Using case studies, we will apply multiple liberal arts lenses to consider how best to address global (including local) health crises. What does it mean to think critically, lead effectively, act responsibly, and live humanely in an inequitable world? Come share your thoughts! 1.00
FIN S206
15
FRT-101-12
History and Cinema
Rhoades M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. FRT-101-12: History and Cinema Michelle Rhoades teaches History and enjoys teaching European history and travel. Students in this tutorial will explore the relationship between film and history. Naturally, we can view history in motion pictures as a backdrop to the story or actions of the main characters. This is useful for general educational purposes (WWII happened) but what if that history is wrong? When the past is altered and a film becomes very popular, we can still learn a good deal about the society that viewed that film. Choices made by documentary filmmakers can offer interpretations of the past that are incomplete but valuable for understanding viewers' perspectives. Students in this tutorial will read about 20th century European history, view films, and discuss how well the films represent the past. Motion pictures and documentaries screened in the course will address the Holocaust, Weimar Germany, WWI, and WWII. Films screened for class may include "Inglorious Bastards," "The Sorrow and the Pity," "Night and Fog," "Sophie Scholl," "Casablanca," "All Quiet on the Western Front," "Life and Nothing But," "Joyeux Noël," "The Officer's Ward," "Paths of Glory," "Behind the Lines," or "Dawn Patrol." All films will be shown during class time with discussion to follow. 1.00
FIN M120
15
FRT-101-13
Swords, Sorcery, and Reality
Morillo S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. FRT-101-13: Swords, Sorcery, and Reality: "Medieval" Warfare in Fantasy Literature and History Stephen Morillo teaches and writes about world, medieval, and military history. He's a long-time fantasy literature fan, and has rampaged his way through various D&D worlds as various incarnations of the warrior Garkon, Lord of Gah. This tutorial will explore the wars depicted in a variety of classic and contemporary fantasy literature with the reality of the medieval European warfare on which the fantasy conflict is based. Which fantasy authors "get it right"? Does getting it right matter? We will explore the topic through a variety of literature readings, plus selected scenes from movie and TV versions of fantasy combat (Tolkien, Game of Thrones, etc.), in comparison with primary sources for medieval warfare in Europe and beyond. The tutorial will encourage a full immersion in the topic by including board-game simulations of fantasy and real warfare. Pit your wizard against William the Conqueror! 1.00
MXI 109
15
FRT-101-14
Caesar Builds Wabash
Hartnett J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. FRT-101-14: Caesar Builds Wabash: How Ancient Rome Can Help Us Design Our Next Campus Center Jeremy Hartnett teaches archaeology, history, and Latin in the Classics department; when he's not traveling to Italy, conducting research, cooking, or hanging out with his family, he's usually playing in the Wabash Pep Band. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill famously said, "We shape our buildings; and afterwards our buildings shape us." Taking a cue from Churchill, this tutorial is concerned with how architecture affects the ways people interact, both in the past and the present, both in the ancient world and in the modern US. Along the way, in order to test-drive our ideas, we will try our hand at designing a new structure for Wabash's campus. The raw material for our exploration will come from the Romans, a society that was obsessed with using buildings to unify, divide, and separate groups of people. Structures like the Colosseum, for example, herded different social classes through specific entrances and then into different levels of seating. The result was a space where society was literally stratified, as few senators rubbed elbows with the common rabble. By contrast, Rome's huge public baths removed many of these barriers, and, with everyone stripped down amid resplendent surroundings, even the lowliest plebs might feel on equal footing with fancy folk. Examining houses from Pompeii will add more techniques to our analytical toolkit, which we'll employ as we turn our attention to our own campus and assess how its buildings draw our community together or serve to separate it. How, for example, might the layout of a dormitory, a fraternity house, a library, or an academic building help or hinder social interactions? This work will set the stage for the last portion of the term, when we will assume the role of designers and architects to contemplate possibilities for a new Wabash campus center. What practical needs should such a building serve? How might this structure shape our college community for the better? On the basis of interviews, surveys, field trips, meetings with practicing architects, and their own ingenuity and creativity, students will create and present virtual designs for the building as their final project in the course. 1.00
DET 111
15
FRT-101-15
Shakespeare
Cherry J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE FRT-101-15: Shakespeare: The Motion Picture! Jim is an Associate Professor and Chair of Theater at the College, as well as the Coordinator of the Film and Digital Media Minor. He teaches a variety of courses, with topics ranging from Ancient Greek performance to the contemporary New York theater scene. He also directs students in theater productions at the College. In his spare time, he enjoys cooking with his wife (Prof. Crystal Benedicks of the English Department), roughhousing with their kids (Georgie, Becky, and Kate), reading good novels, seeing good theater, and watching the Red Sox beat the Yankees. In 1899, a friend of Thomas Edison's filmed scenes from a London production of King John and produced the first cinematic treatment of a Shakespeare play. In the decades thereafter, film directors would attempt to capture Shakespeare on celluloid thousands of times; there were more than 400 Shakespeare films made in the silent era alone. In doing so, film directors, actors, producers, studio heads, designers, and audiences shaped the way we view the author many consider among the most important of all time. Bringing Shakespeare to the screen has delivered his work to a wider audience, and allowed for sometimes-radical reinterpretations of the Bard's work. In this course we will address some of the following questions: How do you adapt a play into a film? Why does Shakespeare continue to be a box office draw nearly four centuries after his death? At what point does a work stop being Shakespeare's, and start being someone else's? And finally, what does Shakespeare "mean" in our own time? Over the course of the semester, we will screen various film versions of Shakespeare's plays including Richard III, Macbeth, Henry V, and Much Ado about Nothing. We will discuss concepts like the nature of adaptation and parody, the politics of popular culture and gender. And at the end of the course, working alongside your peers, you will roll up your sleeves and make your own Shakespeare film. All along, we'll work to improve your writing and research skills, and to help you adjust to the academic and social life of the College. This is a course designed for the freshman interested in Shakespeare, film, and/or theater. No experience necessary! 1.00
LIB GOODRICH
15
FRT-101-17
Pandemic
Brewer A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE FRT-101-17: PANDEMIC Agata Szczeszak-Brewer has more Zs in her name than you do. She is a professor of literature, a writer, and a gardener. She has been at Wabash since 2006 and teaches British, Irish, and South African literature, Science Fiction, and writing. Pandemics have changed the course of history and the make-up of societies, inspired artists, prompted philosophers to think about isolation and control, and revealed human selflessness as well as human capacity for evil. In this tutorial, we will read and talk about disease from Black Death to AIDS and analyze the rhetoric of plague and infestation. We will discuss the ecology, biology, and politics of disease. The field of Medical Humanities has long focused on the social ecology of pandemics, and it will guide our approach to real and imagined disease: the bubonic plague, the cholera pandemic, the Spanish Flu, AIDS, and COVID-19. We will also look at how images and emotions associated with infection have been employed in anti-Semitic, xenophobic, and fascist propaganda to invoke fear of the other. We will read selections from Daniel Defoe, Mary Shelley, Albert Camus, Margaret Atwood, Octavia Butler, JM Coetzee, and Ling Ma; watch Panic in the Streets and Angels in America; listen to an opera (Feast in the Time of Plague); and play Resident Evil 7: Biohazard as well as a popular board game Pandemic. Visiting speakers from across academic disciplines (Biology, Global Health, Political Science, History, Art) will help us understand the topic and form questions for our final podcast project. 1.00
CEN 216
15
FRT-101-18
What We Keep
Strader A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE FRT-101-18: What We Keep: The Objects We Collect and The Stories They Tell Annie Strader is an Artist and collector whose collections sometimes become art. Strader teaches Performance + Video Art, Ceramics, and Advanced/Senior Studio Courses. As an Artist she creates multimedia installations, live performances, sculptures and videos that utilize everyday materials and objects to explore themes of Illusion, disappearance, absence, and loss. What things do you keep or collect? Are they in a box under your bed, tucked in a special drawer, or proudly displayed in your living room? The things we keep reveal our identities - reflecting who we were, who we are, and who want to be. This class will explore our attachments to things, interrogating the impulse behind why people keep and collect throughout history as well as the trend of collecting experiences rather than things. The class will visit personal collections, public collections and create our own collections. 1.00
DET 212
15
FRT-101-19
Landmarks of American Cinema
Rogers D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE American cinema and American culture are deeply interconnected phenomena. Some of the most recognizable phrases in the English language have their origins in movies. For example, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn (Gone with the Wind, 1939), "Toto, I've a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore (The Wizard of Oz, 1939), and "Here's looking at you, kid" (Casablanca, 1942) are phrases that have entered the American vernacular, even when people don't necessarily recognize their movie origins. As John Belton writes in American Cinema/American Culture: "American cinema plays a crucial role in the process of identity-formation. Films not only serve as texts that document who we think we are or were, but they also reflect changes in our self-image, tracing the transformation from one kind of America to another. More importantly . . . it carries [audiences] across difficult periods of cultural transformation." In our tutorial, we will watch, discuss, and write about some of the most important movies in American cultural history. And we will do so with an eye to charting changes and challenges to the complex (and never complete) process of American cultural construction. The principal text that will guide us through that history is Roger Ebert's landmark book, The Great Movies (2003). Ebert's essays not only help us understand the landscape of American cinema, they provide a model for outstanding writing. We'll study them, as we watch the films he references, not just to gain a greater understanding of the history of American film making, but as examples of how to improve your writing. 1.00
HAY 321
5
FRT-101-19D
Landmarks of American Cinema
Rogers D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE NOTE: STUDENTS IN THIS SECTION ATTEND THE CLASS VIRTUALLY. American cinema and American culture are deeply interconnected phenomena. Some of the most recognizable phrases in the English language have their origins in movies. For example, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn (Gone with the Wind, 1939), "Toto, I've a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore (The Wizard of Oz, 1939), and "Here's looking at you, kid" (Casablanca, 1942) are phrases that have entered the American vernacular, even when people don't necessarily recognize their movie origins. As John Belton writes in American Cinema/American Culture: "American cinema plays a crucial role in the process of identity-formation. Films not only serve as texts that document who we think we are or were, but they also reflect changes in our self-image, tracing the transformation from one kind of America to another. More importantly . . . it carries [audiences] across difficult periods of cultural transformation." In our tutorial, we will watch, discuss, and write about some of the most important movies in American cultural history. And we will do so with an eye to charting changes and challenges to the complex (and never complete) process of American cultural construction. The principal text that will guide us through that history is Roger Ebert's landmark book, The Great Movies (2003). Ebert's essays not only help us understand the landscape of American cinema, they provide a model for outstanding writing. We'll study them, as we watch the films he references, not just to gain a greater understanding of the history of American film making, but as examples of how to improve your writing. 1.00
TBA TBA
12
GEN - GENDER STUDIES
GEN-104-01
Intro to Philosophy: Nature
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Crosslisting: PHI-104 = GEN-104. 1.00
HAY 319
10
GEN-104-01F
Intro to Philosophy: Nature
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
HAY 319
8
GEN-105-01
Fatherhood
Olofson E
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. PSY-105.01=GEN-105.01 1.00
CHA CHAPEL
40 23 
GEN-270-02
Extraordinary Bodies
Benedicks C
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE ENG370-01=GEN270-02 What happens when stories and theories represent bodies that aren't "normal"? In this class, we will read narratives by disabled people as well as study theories of disability to try to understand how physical difference challenges traditional views of gender, culture, writing, space, and time. 1.00
CEN 215
15 10 
GEN-270-02D
Extraordinary Bodies
Benedicks C
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
VIRTUAL 0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
GEN-270-03
Medieval Magic/Modern Monsters
Pavlinich E
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE Once upon a time, fairies made public beheadings a noble sport while dragons terrorized the humans of Middle Earth. Although we tend to look down on the Middle Ages from our modern perspectives, contemporary audiences continue to enjoy medieval narratives retold through books and films such as Harry Potter, television adaptations such as Game of Thrones, and video games such as The Legend of Zelda. We will travel back and forth through time, analyzing both medieval texts and modern representations of the Middle Ages, including riddles, poetry, graphic novels, and short films. GEN-270-03 cross list with ENG-180-01 1.00
FIN CONC
2
GEN-270-03F
Medieval Magic/Modern Monsters
Pavlinich E
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
FIN CONC
1
GEN-277-01
Classical Mythology
Gorey M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
FIN CONC
54 54 
GEN-490-01
Senior Capstone
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: GEN-101, , and 2 additional credits from GEN 1.00
TBA TBA
 
GER - GERMAN
GER-101-01
Elementary German I
Van Der Kolk J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. Co-requisite: GER-101L 1.00
MXI 109
16
GER-101-01D
Elementary German I
Van Der Kolk J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. Co-requisite: GER-101L 1.00
TBA TBA
5
GER-101-02
Elementary German I
Van Der Kolk J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HYBRID COURSE. Co-requisite: GER-101L 1.00
BAX 114
16
GER-101-02D
Elementary German I
Van Der Kolk J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
VIRTUAL COURSE Co-requisite: GER-101L 1.00
TBA TBA
5
GER-101L-01
Elementary German I Lab
B. Hahn
M
09:05AM - 09:55AM
Co-requisite: GER-101 0.00
DET 211
6
GER-101L-02
Elementary German I Lab
B. Hahn
TU
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Co-requisite: GER-101 0.00
DET 112
6
GER-101L-03D
Elementary German I Lab
B. Hahn
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: GER-101 0.00
TBA TBA
6
GER-101L-04
Elementary German I Lab
B. Hahn
TH
09:45AM - 10:35AM
Co-requisite: GER-101 0.00
GOO 006
6
GER-101L-05
Elementary German I Lab
B. Hahn
TH
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-requisite: GER-101 0.00
DET 111
6
GER-101L-06
Elementary German I Lab
B. Hahn
F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
Co-requisite: GER-101 0.00
DET 211
6
GER-201-01
Intermediate German
Tucker B
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HYBRID COURSE. Prerequisite: GER-102, or GER-201 placement, Co-requisite: GER-201L 1.00
DET 109
17
GER-201L-01
Intermediate German Lab.
B. Hahn
TU
09:45AM - 10:35AM
Co-requisite: GER-201 0.00
GOO 006
6
GER-201L-02
Intermediate German Lab.
B. Hahn
TU
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-requisite: GER-201 0.00
DET 109
6
GER-201L-03
Intermediate German Lab.
B. Hahn
W
09:05AM - 09:55AM
Co-requisite: GER-201 0.00
DET 112
6
GER-201L-04
Intermediate German Lab.
B. Hahn
W
02:15PM - 03:05PM
Co-requisite: GER-201 0.00
CEN 304
6
GER-301-01
Conversation & Composition
Van Der Kolk J
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. Prerequisite: GER-202, or GER-301 placement 1.00
DET 211
16
GER-313-01
Studies in German Literature
Redding G
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Prerequisites: GER-301 and GER-302 1.00
CEN 305
7
GER-314-01
History of German Lit/Culture
Tucker B
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. Prerequisites: GER-301 and GER-302 1.00
CEN 305
7
GHL - GLOBAL HEALTH
GHL-224-01
Econom & Political Development
Burnette J
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE ECO-224-01 = GHL-224-01 = PPE-264-01 Prerequisite: ECO-101 1.00
BAX 101
25 23 
GHL-232-01
Disability and Politics
McCrary L
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE PSC232-01=PPE232-01=GHL232-01 People with disabilities have been excluded in practice-from buildings, transportation, education, etc.-and also in (political) theory: This class will explore the exclusion of people with disabilities in the history of political thought, from Hobbes and Locke to Rawls, as well as more inclusive political theories, such as those of Martha Nussbaum and Alasdair MacIntyre. It will also explore social movements that work to include people with disabilities, including the Disability Rights movement and the Independent Living Movement, centuries-old foster family care in Geel, Belgium, and L'Arche, where people with disabilities and without disabilities live together in community. This class will include a service learning component-we will be in the community, interacting with people with disabilities. 1.00
CEN 215
18 14 
GHL-310-01
Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
HYBRID COURSE. PSY-310=NSC-310=GHL-310 Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia Title: Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of death in the US, with steep costs to affected individuals and their families. A better understanding of the disease pathology, potential treatments and effective prevention strategies are a critical part of the effort to reduce the burden and suffering associated with this condition. In this course, we will consider the neuropathology of AD and other conditions involving dementia, the impact of AD on cognition, known risk factors associated with the disease, and the state of current research into treatments and prevention strategies. Special emphasis will be given to memory systems, including the hippocampus. Prerequisite: PSY/NSC-204 or PSY-235 or BIO-112 0.50
BAX 311
12 12 
GHL-400-01
Capstone in Global Health
Wetzel E
TBA
TBA - TBA
VIRTUAL COURSE. Prereq: BIO-177,PSC-201/SOC-201, and DV1-277. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
GRK - GREEK
GRK-101-01
Beginning Greek I
Wickkiser B
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HYBRID COURSE. Co-requisite: GRK-101L 1.00
HAY 319
15
GRK-101L-01
Beginning Greek I
Wickkiser B
TBA
TBA - TBA
HYBRID COURSE. Co-requisite: GRK-101 0.00
TBA TBA
15
GRK-201-01
Intermediate Greek I
Gorey M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisites: GRK-101 and GRK-102 1.00
DET 211
 
GRK-302-01
Advanced Greek Reading: Prose
Wickkiser B
W F
09:45AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. PreReq GRK-201 1.00
MXI 214
 
HIS - HISTORY
HIS-101-01
World History to 1500
Morillo S
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
DET 209
20
HIS-101-02F
World History to 1500
Royalty B
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
BAX 101
25
HIS-101-03
World History to 1500
S. Kunze
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. 1.00
GOO 104
 
HIS-101-03D
World History to 1500
S. Kunze
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
TBA TBA
20
HIS-102-01
World Hist Since 1500
S. Kunze
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
GOO 104
22
HIS-200-01
End of the World
Royalty B
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
HYBRID COURSE How will the world end? When will the world end? Will the world end at all? While many recall the May 21, 2011 "deadline" of Harold Camping's Family Radio caravans and the "ending" of the Mayan calendar in December 2012, these questions have provoked the human imagination for millennia. This course will study the history of how these questions have been posed and answered from Jewish and Christian communities in the ancient Mediterranean world to Christians in medieval Europe to contemporary America.Using the lenses of social, cultural and political history, we will examine how these apocalyptic ideas have been shaped by historical events and how subgroups have interacted with, and often changed, society. 1.00
BAX 114
12
HIS-200-01F
End of the World
Royalty B
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
BAX 114
5
HIS-200-02
Contemp Hist of Race & Racism
S. Kunze
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
BAX 202
22 12 
HIS-220-01
Houses & Society Ancient Wld
Hartnett J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. CLA-112-01=HIS-220-01=CLA-112-01F=HIS220-01F Pompeii's gritty streets, humble shacks in the Greek countryside, over-the-top villas of Rome's emperors - inhabitants of the ancient Mediterranean dwelled in all manner of different places and fashions. How did these "houses" reflect Greek and Roman life? Who lived in them? How were they organized and decorated? And how did the built environment shape interaction among inhabitants as well as between them and "outsiders?" This class will entertain these questions by blending readings from primary sources with analysis of archaeological remains. A chief goal is to introduce students to the basics of social history as we consider social structure, cultural values, domestic space, and the relationships among them. Key themes include gender, status, childhood, slavery, religion, and law. In addition, non-ancient houses and households - such as a Frank Lloyd Wright house in West Lafayette as well as Wabash dorms and fraternity houses - will offer comparative material and provide the opportunity for further exploration of modern conceptions of house and family. 1.00
FIN CONC
24 17 
HIS-220-01F
Houses and Society Ancient Wld
Hartnett J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. CLA-112-01=CLA-112-01F=HIS-220-01=HIS220-01F Pompeii's gritty streets, humble shacks in the Greek countryside, over-the-top villas of Rome's emperors - inhabitants of the ancient Mediterranean dwelled in all manner of different places and fashions. How did these "houses" reflect Greek and Roman life? Who lived in them? How were they organized and decorated? And how did the built environment shape interaction among inhabitants as well as between them and "outsiders?" This class will entertain these questions by blending readings from primary sources with analysis of archaeological remains. A chief goal is to introduce students to the basics of social history as we consider social structure, cultural values, domestic space, and the relationships among them. Key themes include gender, status, childhood, slavery, religion, and law. In addition, non-ancient houses and households - such as a Frank Lloyd Wright house in West Lafayette as well as Wabash dorms and fraternity houses - will offer comparative material and provide the opportunity for further exploration of modern conceptions of house and family. 1.00
FIN CONC
8
HIS-231-01
19th Century Europe
Rhoades M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
BAX 101
25
HIS-240-01
Malcolm, Martin and Mandela
Thomas S
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HYBRID COURSE. HIS-240-01=BLS-270-04 This course considers the overlapping lives and legacies of Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr., and Nelson Mandela, three revolutionary figures whose influence on the fight for civil rights in America and Africa was profound and far reaching. Though the American public rarely imagined them as political bedfellows in their time, a closer inspection of their lives reveals striking autobiographical similarities and pan-African connections. Students will closely examine the convergences and confluences of their biographies, political ideologies, and activism while exploring broader issues including colonialism, civil disobedience, cultural resistance, social justice, and freedom. We will consider how their lives intersected in the transnational struggle for racial equality and how their legacies continue to shape contemporary debates about black identity and the continued crisis of American race relations? 1.00
MXI 109
16 10 
HIS-240-02
Soc Stud Ed for Democratic Cit
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:15PM - 03:35PM
HYBRID COURSE. Crosslisting: HIS-240-92=EDU-250-01=BLS-270-03 1.00
MXI 214
6
HIS-241-01
United States to 1865
Thomas S
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
BAX 101
20 10 
HIS-241-01D
United States to 1865
Thomas S
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. 1.00
TBA TBA
5
HIS-252-01
Peoples & Nations of Latin Ame
Warner R
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
HYBRID COURSE HIS-252.01=HSP-252.01 1.00
BAX 114
17
HIS-300-01
Wabash in World History
Warner R
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
HYBRID COURSE This course engages themes in world history since 1832, as well as institutional and personal histories related to Wabash College since that time. As such, the class will explore important historical topics across global lines during these two centuries, in part to see how these events and trends influenced the history of our College. Additionally, we will investigate the stories of particular Wabash men and women who have lived lives of global importance. In other words, the class will study the historical context through which Wabash has persevered since 1832, as well as the individual and college participation in this period. Previous work in History is required. This class meets early in the morning. Prerequisite: at least 0.5 credit in HIS 1.00
BAX 114
17
HIS-300-01D
Wabash in World History
Warner R
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
VIRTUAL Prerequisite: at least 0.5 credit in HIS 1.00
TBA TBA
1
HIS-300-02
War & Conflict in Middle Ages
Morillo S
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE. This course takes a "deep history" look at the patterns and practices of armed conflict of all sorts in the world of approximately 400 to 1500. The chronology of the period, what makes it a coherent period (if anything!), the definitions of what counts as war and conflict, and how we take "a global perspective" will all come in for scrutiny in a course that will encourage unorthodox views of the topic - culminating in student research papers that will explore some aspect of the broad topic based on student preferences and choices. Previous course work in pre-modern (pre-1500) history recommended but not required. Prerequisite: at least 0.5 credit in HIS 1.00
BAX 212
14
HIS-300-02D
War & Conflict in Middle Ages
Morillo S
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
VIRTUAL COURSE Prerequisite: at least 0.5 credit in HIS 1.00
TBA TBA
1
HIS-310-01
Historical Jesus
Royalty B
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE. HIS-310-01=REL-372-01 "From Jesus to Christ" . . ." The Proclaimer became the Proclaimed" . . . "Jesus preached the Kingdom of God and what came about was the Church." What can we really know about Jesus of Nazareth, one of the most important historical figures in world history? These slogans reflect the differences, even the divisions, perceived by many scholars, for well over 200 years now, between the activities, sayings, and intentions of the "historical Jesus" and "Jesus Christ" of the Church's creeds and confessions. This class will examine these recent claims by leading scholars that that earliest and best sources about Jesus of Nazareth and Second Temple Judaism and the creeds of Christian Churches are at odds with each other-sometimes mildly, sometimes dramatically so. Prerequisite: at least 0.5 credits in HIS 1.00
BAX 311
12 10 
HIS-497-01
Phil & Craft of Hist
Rhoades M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. 1.00
DET 212
 
HIS-497-02
Phil & Craft of History
Warner R
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
HIS-498-01
Senior Seminar
Thomas S, Warner R
TBA
TBA - TBA
VIRTUAL COURSE 1.00
TBA TBA
 
HSP - HISPANIC STUDIES
HSP-252-01
Peoples & Nations of Lat.Amer.
Warner R
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
BAX 114
17 15 
HSP-252-01D
Peoples & Nations of Lat.Amer.
Warner R
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
1
HSP-400-01D
Senior Capstone
Warner R
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
 
HUM - HUMANITIES
HUM-176-01
Intr to Liberal Arts At Wabash
Horton R, Pittard M
W
07:30PM - 08:45PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 0.50
HAY 104
30
INT - INTERNSHIP
INT-398-01
Internship
Wysocki L
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
INT-498-01
Internship
Mikek P
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
INT-498-02
Internship
Wetzel E
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
INT-498-03
Internship
Turner W
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
INT-498-04
Internship
Saha S
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
INT-498-05
Internship
Westphal C
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
LAT - LATIN
LAT-101-01
Beginning Latin I
Gorey M
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
HYBRID COURSE Co-Requisite: LAT-101L 1.00
BAX 202
20
LAT-101L-01
Beginning Latin
Gorey M
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: LAT-101 0.00
DET 111
20 11 
LAT-101L-02
Beginning Latin
Gorey M
TH
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Co-Requisite: LAT-101 0.00
DET 111
20 10 
LAT-201-01
Intermediate Latin I
Kubiak D
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: LAT-102, or placement in LAT-201 1.00
DET 111
15
LAT-301-01
Advanced Latin Reading: Poetry
Kubiak D
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: LAT-201, or LAT-301 placement 1.00
DET 112
 
MAT - MATHEMATICS
MAT-010-01
Pre-Calc With Intro to Calc
Turner W
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-010 placement 1.00
LIB GOODRICH
30
MAT-103-01
Probability
Thompson P
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
HYBRID COURSE 0.50
HAY 104
30
MAT-104-01
Statistics
Thompson P
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
HYBRID COURSE 0.50
HAY 104
30
MAT-108-01
Intro to Discrete Structures
Westphal C
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
GOO 104
24
MAT-111-01
Calculus I
Gates Z
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
HAY 003
22
MAT-111-02
Calculus I
Poffald E
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
GOO 101
12
MAT-111-02D
Calculus I
Poffald E
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE 1.00
TBA TBA
12
MAT-111-03
Calculus I
Gates Z
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
HAY 003
23
MAT-111-04
Calculus I
Ansaldi K
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
HAY 003
23
MAT-112-01
Calculus II
McKinney C
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: MAT-110 or MAT-111 with a minimum grade of C-, or MAT-112 placement 1.00
GOO 101
15
MAT-112-01D
Calculus II
McKinney C
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
VIRTUAL COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-110 or MAT-111 with a minimum grade of C-, or MAT-112 placement 1.00
TBA TBA
5
MAT-112-02
Calculus II
Ansaldi K
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-110 or MAT-111 with a minimum grade of C-, or MAT-112 placement 1.00
HAY 003
23 13 
MAT-178-01
Mathematics of Games
Gates Z
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. An introduction to the mathematical theory of two-player games with no chance involved. We will cover basic strategies for these games, game trees, sums of games, impartial games, and determining when games are equivalent to numbers. Examples of some games we will see include Domineering, Nim, Dots & Boxes, and Subtraction Games. This course will count for distribution in Quantitative Literacy, but not toward a major or minor in Mathematics. 0.50
HAY 003
23 19 
MAT-223-01
Elementary Linear Algebra
Poffald E
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-112 with a minimum grade of C-, or MAT-223 placement. 1.00
GOO 101
12
MAT-225-01
Multivariable Calculus
Turner W
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisites: MAT-112 with a minimum grade of C-, and MAT-223 1.00
GOO 101
12
MAT-251-01
Mathematical Finance
Thompson P
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-112 0.50
GOO 104
20
MAT-251-01D
Mathematical Finance
Thompson P
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
VIRTUAL COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-112 0.50
TBA TBA
5
MAT-252-01
Math Interest Theory
Thompson P
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-112 0.50
GOO 104
20
MAT-252-01D
Math Interest Theory
Thompson P
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
VIRTUAL COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-112 0.50
TBA TBA
5
MAT-253-01
Probability Models
Thompson P
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-112 0.50
BAX 202
20
MAT-253-01D
Probability Models
Thompson P
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
VIRTUAL COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-112 0.50
TBA TBA
5 -2 
MAT-277-01
Introduction to Proofs
Gates Z
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. An introduction to formal logic, set theory, and methods of proof. Topics include logic, quantifiers, set theory, mathematical induction, proof by contradiction and contraposition, relations, functions, modular arithmetic, and divisibility. Not available to students who have already completed MAT 331. Will count toward a Math major or minor. Will count for distribution in Quantitative Literacy. Prerequisite: MAT-112 0.50
HAY 003
23 18 
MAT-332-01
Abstract Algebra II
Ansaldi K
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-331 1.00
GOO 101
8
MAT-333-01
Funct Real Variable I
Poffald E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-223 1.00
GOO 006
15 11 
MAT-337-01
Numerical Analysis
Westphal C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisites: CSC-111 and MAT-223 1.00
GOO 101
24 18 
MAT-337-01D
Numerical Analysis
Westphal C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. Prerequisites: CSC-111 and MAT-223 1.00
TBA TBA
1
MAT-353-01
Probability Models II
Thompson P
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-253 0.50
BAX 202
20 11 
MAT-353-01D
Probability Models II
Thompson P
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
VIRTUAL COURSE Prerequisite: MAT-253 0.50
TBA TBA
5 -1 
MLL - MODERN LANGUAGES
MLL-101-02
Elementary Modern Language I
Hardy J
TBA
TBA - TBA
CoReq MLL-101L 1.00
TBA TBA
1
MLL-287-01
Intermediate Japanese
Li Y
TU
11:10AM - 12:00PM
F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
DET 220
DET 220
2
MSL - MILITARY SCIENCE & LEADERSHIP
MSL-001-01
Leadership Lab (ROTC)
Staff
TH
03:30PM - 05:20PM
This non-credit course is associated with the ROTC program at Purdue University and meets at the Purdue campus. It may be repeated in multiple semesters. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MSL-101-01
Foundations of Leadership
Staff
TH
01:30PM - 02:20PM
This non-credit course is associated with the ROTC program at Purdue University and meets at the Purdue campus. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MSL-301-01
Trng Mgmt & Wrfhtg Fnc (ROTC)
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
This non-credit course is associated with the ROTC program at Purdue University and meets at the Purdue campus. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS - MUSIC
MUS-053-01
Glee Club (No Credit)
S. Williams
M TU W TH
04:15PM - 06:00PM
HYBRID COURSE. 0.00
FIN CONC
50 24 
MUS-102-01
World Music
Badue A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
FIN M120
16
MUS-104-01
Music and Social Conflict
Ables M
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE Music has long informed or reflected social conflict, often acting as an agent of change or used in mobilizing movements. In this class, we'll examine the music that accompanied and inspired political and social revolutions from the 18th century through today. This will include case studies of classical, pop, folk, and religious music. No prerequisites or experience in music required. 1.00
FIN CONC
30
MUS-104-01D
Music and Social Conflict
Ables M
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
VIRTUAL 1.00
TBA TBA
1
MUS-160-01
Beginning Applied Music
Abel A
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or departmental exam, or instructor permission 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-160-03
Beginning Applied Music
C. Everett
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or departmental exam, or instructor permission 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-160-04
Beginning Applied Music
D. Norton
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or departmental exam, or instructor permission 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-160-05
Beginning Applied Music
Pazera C
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or departmental exam, or instructor permission 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-160-06
Beginning Applied Music
S. Williams
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or departmental exam, or instructor permission 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-161-01
Beginning Applied Music
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
MUS-107 or department placement exam, and MUS-160, or instructor permnission. 0.50
TBA TBA
 
MUS-201-01
Music Theory I
S. Williams
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. PreReq MUS-107 or Permission of Instructor, CoReq MUS-201L 1.00
FIN M140
20 18 
MUS-201L-01
Music Theory I Lab
S. Williams
M W
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. CoReq MUS-201, MUS-106 or 107 0.00
FIN M140
 
MUS-204-01D
Popular Music in United States
Badue A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. 1st half semester: August 12 - September 29. We will study a broad spectrum of popular music performed and heard in the United States and probe its relationship to small- and large-scale changes in American culture. This course is divided into two halves. In the first portion, we will learn principal methods in music research (musicology and ethnomusicology), basic ethnography, and genres and styles from until the mid-20th-century. The second half will cover from the rock revolution of the 1960s to the present. In both halves, we will ask questions about the centrality of America's vernacular genres to its musical heritage. We will learn about the origins of African American, Latin American, and Anglo-American traditions, discuss notable characteristics in folk and popular idioms, and venture to explain how and why vernacular and popular genres provide compelling means to communicate with others and express social values. Music 204 will be taught as a virtual course this semester. Students on campus as well as students who will not be in residency are encouraged to enroll. 0.50
BAX 114
17 11 
MUS-204-02D
Popular Music in United States
Badue A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. 2nd half semester: September 30 - November 17. We will study a broad spectrum of popular music performed and heard in the United States and probe its relationship to small- and large-scale changes in American culture. This course is divided into two halves. In the first portion, we will learn principal methods in music research (musicology and ethnomusicology), basic ethnography, and genres and styles from until the mid-20th-century. The second half will cover from the rock revolution of the 1960s to the present. In both halves, we will ask questions about the centrality of America's vernacular genres to its musical heritage. We will learn about the origins of African American, Latin American, and Anglo-American traditions, discuss notable characteristics in folk and popular idioms, and venture to explain how and why vernacular and popular genres provide compelling means to communicate with others and express social values. Music 204 will be taught as a virtual course this semester. Students on campus as well as students who will not be in residency are encouraged to enroll. 0.50
BAX 114
17 10 
MUS-205-01
European Music Before 1750
Ables M
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
DET 109
20 11 
MUS-260-01
Intermediate Applied Music I
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-161, or two semesters of MUS-160. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-260-02
Intermediate Applied Music I
B. Anderson
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-161, or two semesters of MUS-160. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-260-03
Intermediate Applied Music I
C. Everett
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-161, or two semesters of MUS-160. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-260-04
Intermediate Applied Music I
D. Norton
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-161, or two semesters of MUS-160. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-260-05
Intermediate Applied Music I
Pazera C
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-161, or two semesters of MUS-160. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-260-06
Intermediate Applied Music I
S. Williams
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-161, or two semesters of MUS-160. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-287-01
Music & Social Conflict
Ables M
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
2
MUS-304-02
Arrangements & Compositions
S. Williams
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
MUS-360-01
Intermediate Applied Music II
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-261 or two semesters of MUS-260. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-360-03
Intermediate Applied Music II
C. Everett
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-261 or two semesters of MUS-260. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-360-04
Intermediate Applied Music II
D. Norton
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-261 or two semesters of MUS-260. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-360-06
Intermediate Applied Music II
S. Williams
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-261 or two semesters of MUS-260. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-401-01
Senior Seminar
Ables M
TBA
TBA - TBA
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
TBA TBA
10
MUS-460-01
Advanced Applied Music
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-361, or two semesters of MUS-360. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
NSC - NEUROSCIENCE
NSC-310-01
Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
HYBRID COURSE.PSY-310-01=NSC-310-01=GHL-310-01 Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of death in the US, with steep costs to affected individuals and their families. A better understanding of the disease pathology, potential treatments and effective prevention strategies are a critical part of the effort to reduce the burden and suffering associated with this condition. In this course, we will consider the neuropathology of AD and other conditions involving dementia, the impact of AD on cognition, known risk factors associated with the disease, and the state of current research into treatments and prevention strategies. Special emphasis will be given to memory systems, including the hippocampus. Prerequisite: PSY/NSC-204 or PSY-235 or BIO-112 0.50
BAX 311
11
NSC-310-01D
Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
VIRTUAL COURSE Prerequisite: PSY-204, NSC-204, PSY-235, or BIO-112 0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
NSC-400-01
Neuroscience Sr Capstone
Schmitzer-Torbert N
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
 
OCS - OFF CAMPUS STUDY
OCS-01-01
Off Campus Study
To be Announced
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PE - PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE-011-01
Advanced Fitness
Brumett K, P. Sullivan
M W F
06:00AM - 07:15AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PE-011-02
Advanced Fitness
Martin J, J. Niespodziany, Quinn a
M W F
06:00AM - 06:50AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PE-011-03
Advanced Fitness
Martin J, J. Niespodziany, Quinn a
M W F
07:00AM - 07:50AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PHI - PHILOSOPHY
PHI-104-01
Intro to Philosophy: Nature
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE.Crosslisting: PHI-104 = GEN-104. 1.00
HAY 319
10
PHI-104-01F
Intro to Philosophy: Nature
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
HAY 319
8
PHI-110-01
Philosophical Ethics
Hughes C
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
HAY 319
14
PHI-110-01F
Philosophical Ethics
Hughes C
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
HAY 319
10
PHI-124-01
Philosophy and Film
Gower J
TU
01:10PM - 03:55PM
TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
HAY 104
HAY 104
20
PHI-124-01F
Philosophy and Film
Gower J
TU
01:10PM - 03:55PM
TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
HAY 104
HAY 104
5
PHI-213-01
Philosophy of Law
Hughes C
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
BAX 114
16 11 
PHI-218-01
Philosophy of Commerce
Gower J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE PHI-218-01 = PPE-218-01 1.00
HAY 104
30
PHI-240-01
Ancient Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. PHI-240=CLA-240 1.00
HAY 104
30
PHI-345-01
Continental Philosophy
Hughes C
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: PHI-240 (or taken concurrently), and PHI-242 1.00
BAX 212
14
PHI-449-01
Sr Seminar: Plato's Republic
Trott A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. The senior seminar focuses on one text across the semester - Plato's Republic - with the goal of having students develop a seminar paper in which they take up their own set of questions and concerns about the text. Students will present on secondary literature throughout the course, write close reading papers and then develop an insight into a long essay. Required for all senior philosophy majors. 1.00
BAX 212
15
PHY - PHYSICS
PHY-101-01
Astronomy
Ross G
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Co-Requisite: PHY-101L 1.00
FIN CONC
40
PHY-101L-01A
Astronomy Lab
Ross G
M
12:30PM - 02:15PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Co-Requisite: PHY-101 0.00
GOO 205
10
PHY-101L-01B
Astronomy Lab
Ross G
M
02:30PM - 04:30PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Co-Requisite: PHY-101 0.00
GOO 205
10
PHY-101L-02A
Astronomy Lab
Ross G
TU
12:30PM - 02:15PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Co-Requisite: PHY-101 0.00
GOO 205
10
PHY-101L-02B
Astronomy Lab
Ross G
TU
02:30PM - 04:30PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Co-Requisite: PHY-101 0.00
GOO 205
10
PHY-109-01D
Physics I - Algebra
Tompkins N
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
VIRTUAL COURSE Co-Requisite: PHY-109L 1.00
TBA TBA
40
PHY-109L-01D
Physics I-Algebra Lab
Tompkins N
TBA
TBA - TBA
VIRTUAL COURSE Co-Requisite: PHY-109 0.00
TBA TBA
40
PHY-111-01
Physics I-Calculus
Krause D
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
Lecture is VIRTUAL and the lab component is FACE to FACE. Prerequisites: MAT-110 or MAT-111, or placement into MAT-111 with concurrent registration, or placement into MAT-112 or MAT-223, Co-Requisite: PHY-111L 1.00
GOO 104
34 21 
PHY-111-01F
Physics I - Calculus
Krause D
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
Lecture is VIRTUAL and the lab component is FACE to FACE. Prerequisites: MAT-110 or MAT-111, or placement into MAT-111 with concurrent registration, or placement into MAT-112 or MAT-223, Co-Requisite: PHY-111L 1.00
GOO 104
34 21 
PHY-111L-01
Physics I-Calculus Lab
Krause D
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
The lecture is VIRTUAL and the lab component is FACE to FACE Co-Requisite: PHY-111 0.00
GOO 201
10
PHY-111L-01F
Physics I - Calculus Lab
Krause D
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
The lecture is VIRTUAL and the lab component is FACE to FACE Co-Requisite: PHY-111 0.00
GOO 201
4
PHY-111L-02
Physics I-Calculus Lab
Krause D
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
The lecture is VIRTUAL and the lab component is FACE to FACE. Co-Requisite: PHY-111 0.00
GOO 201
10
PHY-111L-02F
Physics I - Calculus Lab
Krause D
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
The lecture is VIRTUAL and the lab component is FACE to FACE. Co-Requisite: PHY-111 0.00
TBA TBA
8
PHY-111L-03F
Physics I - Calculus Lab
Krause D
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
The lecture is VIRTUAL and the lab component is FACE to FACE Co-Requisite: PHY-111 0.00
GOO 201
13
PHY-209-01
Intro Thermal Phy & Relativity
Brown J
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisites: PHY-112 with a minimum grade of C-, and MAT-112, Co-Requisite: PHY-209L 1.00
GOO 305
10
PHY-209L-01
Intr Thrm Phy & Relativity Lab
Brown J
TU
12:30PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-209, Prerequisites: PHY-112 and MAT-112 0.00
GOO 305
10
PHY-209L-02
Thermal Physics Lab
Brown J
TU
08:00AM - 11:00AM
Co-Requisite: PHY-209, Prerequisites: PHY-112 and MAT-112 0.00
GOO 306
5
PHY-310-01
Classical Mechanics
Brown J
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. PHY-112 with a minimum grade of C- and MAT-224, or permission of instructor 1.00
GOO 305
20 15 
PHY-315-01
Quantum Mechanics
Krause D
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisites: PHY-210 with a minimum grade of C-, MAT-223, and MAT-224 1.00
GOO 305
20 17 
PHY-381-01
Advanced Laboratory I
Brown J
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: PHY-210, Co-Requisite: PHY-381L 0.50
GOO 102
20 18 
PHY-382-01
Advanced Laboratory II
Brown J
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: PHY-381 0.50
GOO 002
20 17 
PPE - PHILOSOPHY POLITICS ECONOMICS
PPE-213-01
Philosophy of Law
Hughes C
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE PHI-213.01=PPE-213.01 1.00
BAX 114
16
PPE-218-01
Philosophy of Commerce
Gower J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE PHI-218-01 = PPE-218-01 1.00
HAY 104
30 24 
PPE-228-01
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE. Crosslisting: PPE-228-01=EDU-201-01=BLS-270-01 Prerequiste ENG-101 1.00
MXI 109
12 12 
PPE-232-01
Disability and Politics
McCrary L
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE PSC-232-01=PPE-232-01=GHL-232-01 People with disabilities have been excluded in practice-from buildings, transportation, education, etc.-and also in (political) theory: This class will explore the exclusion of people with disabilities in the history of political thought, from Hobbes and Locke to Rawls, as well as more inclusive political theories, such as those of Martha Nussbaum and Alasdair MacIntyre. It will also explore social movements that work to include people with disabilities, including the Disability Rights movement and the Independent Living Movement, centuries-old foster family care in Geel, Belgium, and L'Arche, where people with disabilities and without disabilities live together in community. This class will include a service learning component-we will be in the community, interacting with people with disabilities. 1.00
CEN 216
18 15 
PPE-256-01
The Global Economy
Saha S
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE. ECO-220-01=ASI-277-01=PPE-256-01 The goal of this course is to offer an overview of different aspects of the global economy. It provides a basic understanding of the fundamental theories of international economics including both international trade and international finance, with regard to the historical and institutional contexts in which the U.S. economy operates, and to broaden the understanding of other economies by studying their policy problems within the analytical framework of international economics. With globalization, an economy cannot be treated individually, and so it is important to know how differences in location can make economic activities easier. This course has two parts: the first part will focus on topics on international trade such as, trade theories, trade policies and impacts of international trade on the environment. The second part of this course will concentrate on topics on international finance such as, balance of payments, exchange rates, regional issues in global economy, etc. This course explores the economic fundamentals regarding the dynamics of global economy, and how to relate it to the current, global and real-world scenarios in terms of economic, social, and political interactions. Prerequisite: ECO-101 1.00
GOO 104
25 14 
PPE-264-01
Economic & Political Dvlpmnt
Burnette J
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE ECO-224-01 = GHL-224-01 = PPE-264-01 Take ECO-101 1.00
BAX 101
25 19 
PPE-327-01
Nationalism & Ethnic Conflict
Hollander E
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. PSC-327.01=PPE-327.01 Prerequisite: PSC-121 with a minimum grade of C- 1.00
MXI 109
12
PPE-333-01
Constitutional Law
Himsel S
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
HYBRID COURSE. PSC-313-01 = PPE-333-01 1.00
BAX 202
20 12 
PPE-400-01
Senior Seminar for PPE
Gower J, Snow N
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisites: PPE-200 and at least one 300 level PPE course, or permission of the instructor 1.00
DET 111
 
PSC - POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSC-111-01
Intro to Amer Govt & Politics
Gelbman S
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
FIN BALL
22
PSC-111-01F
Intro to Amer Govt & Politics
Gelbman S
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
FIN BALL
13
PSC-121-01
Intro to Comparative Politics
Hollander E
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
FIN BALL
24
PSC-121-01F
Intro to Comparative Politics
Hollander E
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
FIN BALL
11
PSC-131-01
Intro to Political Theory
McCrary L
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
LIB GOODRICH
27
PSC-131-01F
Intro to Political Theory
McCrary L
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
LIB GOODRICH
8
PSC-141-01
Intro to Intn'l Relations
Wells M
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
LIB GOODRICH
25
PSC-141-01D
Intro to Intn'l Relations
Wells M
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
VIRTUAL COURSE 1.00
TBA TBA
1
PSC-141-01F
Intro to Intn'l Relations
Wells M
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
LIB GOODRICH
10
PSC-200-01
Political Inquiry & Analysis
Wells M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. This course is for students who intend to major in Political Science. The course introduces students to the craft of asking and answering questions about politics. It considers the variety of normative, descriptive, and causal concerns that motivate contemporary political science and surveys an array of approaches political scientists use to gather and analyze information in their quest to understand political phenomena. In addition to examining the use of fundamental research process elements in published political science studies, students will produce their own research project proposal. Enrollment by instructor permission. Prerequisite: PSC-111, PSC-121, PSC-131, PSC-141, or permission of the instructor 1.00
BAX 212
14
PSC-210-01
Educational Policy & Eval
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. Crosslisting: PSC-201-01=EDU-240-01=BLS-270-02 Prerequisite: FRT-101 Freshman Tutorial 1.00
MXI 109
16
PSC-210-02
Contemp Hist of Race & Racism
S. Kunze
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
BAX 202
22 19 
PSC-210-03D
Election Polling & Public Opin
Gelbman S
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
0.50
TBA TBA
1
PSC-211-01
Election Polling & Public Opin
Gelbman S
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. Election polls are ubiquitous in American politics. For months - if not years - before elections, commercial pollsters, campaign strategists, and academic survey researchers constantly query population samples in order to get a handle on what the American public thinks about issues, candidates, and campaign developments. This course takes a peek behind the curtain to examine how public opinion polls are conducted, the challenges pollsters face in their efforts to accurately measure the attitudes and beliefs of large populations, best practices for media reporting on poll results, and the relationship between public opinion polling and democracy. 1.00
BAX 202
18
PSC-232-01
Disability and Politics
McCrary L
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE PSC-232-01=PPE-232-01=GHL-232-01 People with disabilities have been excluded in practice-from buildings, transportation, education, etc.-and also in (political) theory: This class will explore the exclusion of people with disabilities in the history of political thought, from Hobbes and Locke to Rawls, as well as more inclusive political theories, such as those of Martha Nussbaum and Alasdair MacIntyre. It will also explore social movements that work to include people with disabilities, including the Disability Rights movement and the Independent Living Movement, centuries-old foster family care in Geel, Belgium, and L'Arche, where people with disabilities and without disabilities live together in community. This class will include a service learning component-we will be in the community, interacting with people with disabilities. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
CEN 216
18
PSC-287-01
St. Voter Moblization Covid
Gelbman S
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
PSC-300-01
Research/Stats Political Sci
Hollander E
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. In previous years, this course was numbered as PSC 297 1.00
BAX 214
15
PSC-313-01
Constitutional Law
Himsel S
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
HYBRID COURSE. PSC-313-01 = PPE-333-01 1.00
BAX 202
19
PSC-313-01D
Constitutional Law
Himsel S
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
VIRTUAL COURSE 1.00
TBA TBA
1
PSC-327-01
Nationalism & Ethnic Conflict
Hollander E
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: PSC-121 with a minimum grade of C- 1.00
MXI 109
12
PSC-327-01D
Nationalism & Ethnic Conflict
Hollander E
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
VIRTUAL Prerequisite: PSC-121 with a minimum grade of C- 1.00
TBA TBA
1
PSC-344-01
Insurgency/Revolution/Terror
Wells M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: PSC-141 1.00
CEN 215
15
PSC-497-01
Senior Seminar
Gelbman S, McCrary L
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
DET 209
25
PSC-497-01D
Senior Seminar
Gelbman S, McCrary L
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
TBA TBA
1
PSY - PSYCHOLOGY
PSY-101-01
Introduction to Psychology
C. Robison
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
BAX 101
27
PSY-101-01F
Introduction to Psychology
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
BAX 101
25
PSY-101-03
Introduction to Psychology
C. Robison
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
BAX 101
25
PSY-105-01
Fatherhood
Olofson E
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
CHA CHAPEL
40 12 
PSY-201-01
Research Methods & Stats I
Horton R
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisite: PSY-101 1.00
LIB GOODRICH
30
PSY-201-01D
Research Methods & Stats I
Horton R
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
VIRTUAL Prerequisite: PSY-101 1.00
TBA TBA
1
PSY-202-01
Research Methods & Stats II
Olofson E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: PSY-201 1.00
BAX 214
15
PSY-220-01
Child Development
Olofson E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: PSY-101 or PSY-105 1.00
BAX 114
17
PSY-220-01D
Child Development
Olofson E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
VIRTUAL Prerequisite: PSY-101 or PSY-105 1.00
TBA TBA
1
PSY-232-02
Sensation and Perception
C. Robison
TBA
TBA - TBA
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: NSC-204, PSY-204, BIO-101 or BIO-111 1.00
TBA TBA
12 10 
PSY-301-01
Literature Review
Horton R
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisite: PSY-201 1.00
BAX 214
10
PSY-310-01
Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
HYBRID COURSE. PSY-310-01=NSC-310-01=GHL-310-01 Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of death in the US, with steep costs to affected individuals and their families. A better understanding of the disease pathology, potential treatments and effective prevention strategies are a critical part of the effort to reduce the burden and suffering associated with this condition. In this course, we will consider the neuropathology of AD and other conditions involving dementia, the impact of AD on cognition, known risk factors associated with the disease, and the state of current research into treatments and prevention strategies. Special emphasis will be given to memory systems, including the hippocampus. Prerequisite: PSY/NSC-204 or PSY-235 or BIO-112 0.50
BAX 311
12
PSY-322-01
Research in Social Psychology
Horton R
TU
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE Prerequisite: PSY-202 and PSY-222 0.50
BAX 311
12
PSY-495-01
Senior Capstone I
Horton R
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: PSY-202, and PSY-301 (may be taken concurrently) 0.50
TBA TBA
 
PSY-495-02
Senior Project
Olofson E
TBA
TBA - TBA
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: PSY-202, and PSY-301 (may be taken concurrently) 0.50
TBA TBA
 
PSY-495-03
Senior Project
Schmitzer-Torbert N
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: PSY-202, and PSY-301 (may be taken concurrently) 0.50
TBA TBA
 
PSY-496-01
Senior Project
Olofson E
TBA
TBA - TBA
HYBRID COURSE. PSY-495 0.50
TBA TBA
1
REL - RELIGION
REL-103-01
Islam & the Religions of India
Blix D
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
CHA CHAPEL
48
REL-103-01F
Islam & the Religions of India
Blix D
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
CHA CHAPEL
2
REL-141-01
Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Jay J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
ATH 134
14
REL-141-01D
Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Jay J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL 1.00
TBA TBA
1
REL-141-01F
Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Jay J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
ATH 134
8
REL-171-01
History Christianity to Reform
Nelson D
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
FIN CONC
40
REL-171-01F
History Christianity to Reform
Nelson D
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
FIN CONC
10
REL-181-01
Religion in America
Baer J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
CHA CHAPEL
34 13 
REL-181-01D
Religion in America
Baer J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE 1.00
TBA TBA
1
REL-181-01F
Religion in America
Baer J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
CHA CHAPEL
10
REL-194-01
Religion and Film
Nelson D
M F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
W
02:15PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
HAY 104
HAY 104
25
REL-260-01
Top. New Test. & Early Christ.
Jay J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. REL-260-01 This seminar invites an immersive reading of The Gospel of John, widely deemed the most philosophical gospel and the gospel of love. We will closely examine this biblical book chapter by chapter and also consider its impact in the subsequent history of Christianity, where John has been influential in shaping theology, art, and film, among other genres. Part of this legacy with which we will have to deal includes the Gospel's ambiguous portrayal of Jews and its role in the emergence of Antisemitism. 1.00
CEN 304
7
REL-280-01
Religion & Sports in America
Baer J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. REL-280-01 This seminar examines the relationship between religion and sports in American history and the contemporary United States. The world of American sports overflows with religious elements: players praying after games and speaking openly about their faith; the elevation of superstar athletes to modern gods; sports as a means of acculturation and character formation; the creation of sacred space, time, and rituals; the devotion which some fans give to their teams; the cultural worship of youth, health, and fitness; the historic connections between religious ceremonies and athletics; and much more. Drawing upon a range of disciplinary methods, we will investigate the ways religion and sports uphold similar ideals as well as the ways they are in competition with one another for the hearts, minds, bodies, and resources of their devotees. 1.00
CEN 216
18
REL-290-01
Rel Autobiography Traditions
Jay J
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE.REL-290-01 This seminar explores personal stories of finding, losing, and living religion in Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam. We will discuss both memoirs and graphic novels that present stories of self-discovery, encounters with truth, conversion, disenchantment, and deconversion. We will compare the variety of rituals, doctrines, philosophies, myths, ethical stances, institutional involvements, etc. that characterize their religious experiences and discoveries of self and God. The course will conclude with students "impersonating" the figures we have read as they conduct round-table discussions and debates (in character) about the salient issues surrounding these religious lives. 1.00
DET 109
18
REL-297-01
Anthropology of Religion
Baer J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
GOO 104
20 -1 
REL-372-01
Historical Jesus
Royalty B
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. HIS-310-01=REL-372-01 "From Jesus to Christ" . . ." The Proclaimer became the Proclaimed" . . . "Jesus preached the Kingdom of God and what came about was the Church." What can we really know about Jesus of Nazareth, one of the most important historical figures in world history? These slogans reflect the differences, even the divisions, perceived by many scholars, for well over 200 years now, between the activities, sayings, and intentions of the "historical Jesus" and "Jesus Christ" of the Church's creeds and confessions. This class will examine these recent claims by leading scholars that that earliest and best sources about Jesus of Nazareth and Second Temple Judaism and the creeds of Christian Churches are at odds with each other-sometimes mildly, sometimes dramatically so. Prerequisite: REL-171 or REL-172 1.00
TBA TBA
15 15 
REL-490-01
Sr. Sem: Nature & Study of Rel
Blix D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
DET 209
21
RHE - RHETORIC
RHE-101-02
Public Speaking
Geraths C
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
FIN EXP
13
RHE-101-02F
Public Speaking
Geraths C
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE. 1.00
FIN EXP
7
RHE-101-03
Public Speaking
Drury J
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
FIN EXP
13
RHE-101-03F
Public Speaking
Drury J
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
FIN EXP
7
RHE-101-04
Public Speaking
Drury S
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
FIN EXP
13
RHE-101-04F
Public Speaking
Drury S
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
FIN EXP
6
RHE-101-05
Public Speaking
Dicker A
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
FIN EXP
20
RHE-201-01
Reasoning & Advocacy
Drury J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE 1.00
GOO 104
20
RHE-270-01
Political Campaign Comm
Drury S
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HYBRID COURSE What sorts of rhetoric occurs during political campaigns? What rhetorical strategies do candidates use to build support, connect with diverse audiences, address concerns, recover from gaffes (or not), and attack their opponents? How do political campaigns adapt to new rhetorical opportunities in social media use while maintaining campaign traditions, like advertising and debates? How do we evaluate success, effects, and ethics in the rhetoric of elections? In this course we'll study these questions and more, drawing on the discourse of elections past and present across speeches, debates, advertisements, websites, and social media. 1.00
FIN S206
18
RHE-270-01F
Political Campaign Comm
Drury S
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HYBRID COURSE What sorts of rhetoric occurs during political campaigns? What rhetorical strategies do candidates use to build support, connect with diverse audiences, address concerns, recover from gaffes (or not), and attack their opponents? How do political campaigns adapt to new rhetorical opportunities in social media use while maintaining campaign traditions, like advertising and debates? How do we evaluate success, effects, and ethics in the rhetoric of elections? In this course we'll study these questions and more, drawing on the discourse of elections past and present across speeches, debates, advertisements, websites, and social media. 1.00
FIN S206
3
RHE-320-01
Classical Rhetoric
Geraths C
TU TH
07:30PM - 08:45PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. RHE-320-01 = CLA-220-01 1.00
GOO 104
16
RHE-320-01D
Classical Rhetoric
Geraths C
TU TH
07:30PM - 08:45PM
VIRTUAL COURSE 1.00
TBA TBA
1
RHE-350-01
Contemp Rhetorical Theo & Crit
Abbott J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE Prerequisite: FRT-101 1.00
FIN S206
16
RHE-360-01
Gender & Communication
Abbott J
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE 1.00
FIN S206
16
RHE-497-01
Senior Seminar
Abbott J, Geraths C, Drury J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE This course will meet in different rooms, including Ball Theater, Korb Classroom, FAC S206, and Detchon 211. 1.00
FIN BALL
 
SPA - SPANISH
SPA-101-01
Elementary Spanish I
Welch M
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Co-Requisite: SPA-101L 1.00
BAX 114
16
SPA-101-01F
Elementary Spanish I
Welch M
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Co-Requisite: SPA-101L 1.00
BAX 114
10
SPA-101L-01
Elementary Spanish I Lab
V. Barraza
TU
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-101 0.00
CEN 304
6
SPA-101L-02
Elementary Spanish I Lab
V. Barraza
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-101 0.00
DET 112
6
SPA-101L-03
Elementary Spanish I Lab
V. Barraza
F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-101 0.00
CEN 215
6
SPA-103-01
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Rogers D
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE Requires SPA-103 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-103L 1.00
DET 109
9
SPA-103-01F
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Rogers D
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE Requires SPA-103 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-103L 1.00
DET 109
9
SPA-103-02
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Rogers D
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HYBRID COURSE Requires SPA-103 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-103L 1.00
CEN 216
8
SPA-103-02F
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Rogers D
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Requires SPA-103 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-103L 1.00
CEN 216
10
SPA-103-03
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Rogers D
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
Requires SPA-103 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-103L 1.00
CEN 216
 
SPA-103-03F
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Rogers D
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
Requires SPA-103 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-103L 1.00
CEN 216
 
SPA-103L-01
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
C. Calderon
M
03:20PM - 04:10PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103 0.00
DET 112
6
SPA-103L-02
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
C. Calderon
TU
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103 0.00
DET 112
6
SPA-103L-03
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
C. Calderon
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103 0.00
DET 112
6
SPA-103L-04
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
C. Calderon
W
03:20PM - 04:10PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103 0.00
DET 112
6
SPA-103L-05
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
C. Calderon
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103 0.00
CEN 304
6
SPA-103L-06
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
C. Calderon
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103 0.00
DET 112
6
SPA-103L-07
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
C. Calderon
F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103 0.00
DET 112
9
SPA-201-01
Intermediate Spanish
Hardy J
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103, or SPA-201 placement, CoReq SPA-201L 1.00
DET 109
8
SPA-201-01F
Intermediate Spanish
Hardy J
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103, or SPA-201 placement, CoReq SPA-201L 1.00
DET 109
10
SPA-201-02
Intermediate Spanish
Hardy J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103, or SPA-201 placement, CoReq SPA-201L 1.00
BAX 202
8
SPA-201-02F
Intermediate Spanish
Hardy J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103, or SPA-201 placement, CoReq SPA-201L 1.00
TBA TBA
10
SPA-201-03
Intermediate Spanish
Greenhalgh M
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103, or SPA-201 placement, CoReq SPA-201L 1.00
DET 111
5
SPA-201-03F
Intermediate Spanish
Greenhalgh M
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: SPA-102 or SPA-103, or SPA-201 placement, CoReq SPA-201L 1.00
DET 111
10
SPA-201L-01
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
V. Barraza
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 209
7
SPA-201L-02
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
V. Barraza
M
03:20PM - 04:10PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 212
7
SPA-201L-03
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
V. Barraza
TU
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 212
7
SPA-201L-04
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
V. Barraza
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 212
7
SPA-201L-05
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
V. Barraza
W
03:20PM - 04:10PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 212
7
SPA-201L-06
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
V. Barraza
TH
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 211
7
SPA-201L-07
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
V. Barraza
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 212
7
SPA-202-01
Span.Lang. & Hispanic Cultures
Greenhalgh M
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: SPA-201, or SPA-202 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-202L 1.00
CEN 216
12
SPA-202-01F
Span Lang & Hispanic Cultures
Greenhalgh M
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: SPA-201, or SPA-202 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-202L 1.00
CEN 216
6
SPA-202L-01
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
C. Calderon
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-202 0.00
DET 212
6
SPA-202L-02
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
C. Calderon
TU
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-202 0.00
DET 209
6
SPA-202L-03
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
C. Calderon
TH
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-202 0.00
CEN 304
6
SPA-301-01
Conversation & Composition
Monsalve M
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Prerequisite: SPA-202, or SPA-301 placement 1.00
CEN 216
18
SPA-302-01
Intro to Literature
Monsalve M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. SPA-301 or SPA-321, or SPA-302 placement 1.00
DET 211
12
SPA-302-01D
Intro to Literature
Monsalve M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. SPA-301 or SPA-321, or SPA-302 placement 1.00
TBA TBA
1
SPA-311-01
Studies in Spanish Language
Hardy J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. This course offers an overview of the basic concepts and methodology used in Spanish Linguistics, providing students with the tools of linguistic analysis and applying them to the study of Spanish. Attention is given to different levels of analysis in linguistics, including morphology, syntax, phonetics, phonology, language variation (dialects), and language change over time. Class time will be divided between lecture, problem-solving exercises, discussion, and student presentations PreReq SPA-301 and 302. 1.00
DET 212
14
SPA-312-02
Transatlantic Resp of Narcoc
Greenhalgh M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Narcoculture, which began as a form of expression for drug cartels in Mexico and Colombia, has grown in popularity and impacted artforms, dress, language, and religion. This course analyzes representations of narcoculture, from the early twentieth century to the present, in a transatlantic sociopolitical context between Colombia, Mexico, Spain, and the United States. Fundamental issues include the impact on violence, wealth and poverty, as well as masculinity and gender roles. Students will use a variety of artforms-music, literature, film, and television-to develop analytical skills for class discussion and critical essays PreReq SPA-301 and 302 1.00
DET 212
 
SPA-401-01
Spanish Senior Seminar
Monsalve M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. Prerequisite: SPA-302 1.00
DET 211
 
THE - THEATER
THE-101-01
Introduction to Theater
Cherry J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE This course explores many aspects of the theater: the audience, the actor, the visual elements, the role of the director, theater history, and selected dramatic literature. The goal is to heighten the student's appreciation and understanding of the art of the theater. The plays we will encounter will range from the Greek tragedies of 2,500 years ago to new works by contemporary playwrights: from Sophocles' Antigone to Lin-Manuel Miranda's Hamilton. Students will see and write reviews of theater productions, both on- and off-campus. This course is appropriate for all students, at all levels. 1.00
FIN EXP
25
THE-105-01
Introduction to Acting
Vogel H
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE This course introduces students to the fundamentals of acting through physical and vocal exercises, improvisation, preparation of scenes, and text and character analysis. Students will prepare scenes for classroom and public presentation. Students will also collaborate with the directing class in producing an evening of original one-act plays for the community. This course is appropriate for all students, regardless of artistic background. 1.00
FIN BALL
13
THE-105-01F
Introduction to Acting
Vogel H
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE This course introduces students to the fundamentals of acting through physical and vocal exercises, improvisation, preparation of scenes, and text and character analysis. Students will prepare scenes for classroom and public presentation. Students will also collaborate with the directing class in producing an evening of original one-act plays for the community. This course is appropriate for all students, regardless of artistic background. 1.00
FIN BALL
3
THE-202-01
Intro to Scenic Design
Bear A
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE This course traces the design and use of scenery as environments for theatrical performance from concept through opening night. Areas covered include the scene design process, collaboration and critique, model making, and creating appropriate design paperwork. This course will provide the liberal arts student with an exploration of the scenic design process from the page to the stage. This course is appropriate for all students, regardless of artistic background. 1.00
FIN S206
15
THE-204-01
World Cinema
Abbott M
M F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
W
02:15PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. 1.00
FIN M120
40 25 
THE-207-01
Directing
Abbott M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. The art and practice of stage directing is best learned by hands-on experience. This course enables students who have completed the introductory acting course (THE 105) to work on the other side of the stage with student actors. Scene analysis and the development of a fully-formed production concept are also core experiences in the course. The semester culminates in the Studio One-Acts, which the directors will conceive and stage with students enrolled in THE 105, offered concurrently. PreReq THE-105 1.00
FIN EXP
8
THE-208-01
Games and Interactive Media
Abbott M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Digital artists are building immersive interactive worlds that provoke us to reflect on enduring questions facing the human race. Games like This War of Mine, The Last of Us, Kentucky Route Zero, Celeste, and Undertale are challenging the very definition of "game" and pushing designers to explore the power of a new art form to illuminate our minds and spark our imaginations. To produce these rich narrative environments, programming and systems architecture must work hand-in-hand with sturdy dramaturgy, aesthetics, and thoughtful design. This requires creative, problem-solving collaboration among people with wildly disparate talents: coders and poets; AI designers and psychologists; engineers and actors. In this complex creative environment, our liberal arts credo has never been more relevant: it takes a broadly educated mind-or, better, many such minds working together-to grapple with complexity. In this course, we will leverage the power of games and interactive media to convey meaning through channels of communication unavailable to traditional media. 1.00
LIB LGL
12
THE-215-01
The Classic Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE THE-215-01=ENG-310-01 This course will focus on the theater history and dramatic literature between the golden age of classical Greek drama and the revolutionary theater of Romantic period: 2,000 years of theater in one semester. We will study representative plays of various periods and genres-the "old" comedies of the Greeks, the morality plays of medieval Europe, the tragedies of Shakespeare and his contemporaries-while also considering how the plays reflect the moral, social, and political issues of their time. This course is appropriate for all students, regardless of artistic background. 1.00
FIN M120
15
THE-498-01
Senior Seminar
Vogel H
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA