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19/FA Course Faculty Days Comments/Requisites Credits Location Capacity Available Seats
ACC - ACCOUNTING
ACC-201-01
Financial Accounting
Hensley E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
BAX 202
30
ACC-201-02
Financial Accounting
J. Foos
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
BAX 214
30
ART - ART
ART-103-01
Greek Art & Archaeology
Wickkiser B
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
ART-103-01 = CLA-103-01 1.00
HAY 319
35 28 
ART-202-01
Art in Film
Morton E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
FIN M120
36
ART-209-01
20th and 21st Century Art
Morton E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
DET 109
20 14 
ART-223-01
Ceramics
Strader A
TU TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
FIN A119
15
ART-225-01
Experimental Animation
Mohl D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Topics in Studio: Experimental Animation. This survey course will provide students with the basic knowledge and tools needed to create their own animations using Abode After Effects.? Techniques covered may include:?Animating layers, working with masks, distorting objects with the Puppet Tools, using the Roto Brush Tool, color correction and working with the 3D Camera Tracker.??Sound design, composition and other basic image making principles will be explored.? We will also examine the aesthetic nature of experimental film and specifically how it can be applied to animation.? There will be a studio art component during the second half of the semester during which each student will create their own original short experimental animation. 1.00
FIN A113
10
ASI - ASIAN STUDIES
ASI-112-01
Premodern China
Healey C
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
ASI-112-01 = HIS-260-01 - Topics in Asian Culture: Premodern China. This survey course introduces Chinese history and cultural traditions from ancient times to 1911, outlining historical trends such as Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, dynastic cycles, literati culture, traditional gender roles, and interactions with the West. We will analyze a variety of primary sources (in translation), including poetry, fiction, philosophical writings, historical records, and visual art. No pre-requisites. May be taken as Literature/Fine Arts (ASI-112) or History/Philosophy/Religion (HIS-260). 1.00
DET 112
25 16 
ASI-177-01
Global Chinese Cinemas
Healey C
M F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
W
02:10PM - 04:00PM
ASI-177-01 = HIS-260-02. This course traces major trends in Chinese cinema, including works from mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. We will analyze films from multiple angles, including aesthetics, historical context, production, and circulation. In particular, we will focus on tensions between nationalism and transnationalism in Chinese cinema. Film screenings in class Wednesdays. May be taken as Literature/Fine Arts (ASI- 177) or History/Philosophy/Religion (HIS-260). 1.00
DET 109
DET 109
25 18 
ASI-196-01
Classical Chinese Poetry
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ASI-196-01 = HUM-196-01 = REL-196-01 : 2nd Half Semester. "Dancing with the Moon": Religion and Image in Chinese Poetry. "In the heart, it's intention; coming forth in words, it's poetry." So says the "Preface" to the Book of Songs, the ancient classic of Chinese poetry. In this course, we will read selections (in English) from the Book of Songs, and later poets like Li Bo [Li Bai], Du Fu, and Wang Wei. We will study how Chinese poets use image and metaphor to convey their distinctive ideas about nature, religion, and human life. On occasion, we will also read Chinese poems alongside selected English-language poems, comparing their techniques and aims. 0.5 credits. For first half semester at 9:45 TTH, see REL-275. 0.50
MXI 109
20 17 
BIO - BIOLOGY
BIO-111-01
General Biology I
Burton P, Walsh H, Wetzel E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Co-Requisite: BIO-111L 1.00
HAY 104
80 22 
BIO-111L-01
General Biol I Lab
Burton P
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-111 0.00
TBA TBA
20
BIO-111L-02
General Biol I Lab
Walsh H
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-111 0.00
TBA TBA
20
BIO-111L-03
General Biol I Lab
Walsh H
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-111 0.00
TBA TBA
20 13 
BIO-111L-04
General Biol I Lab
Wetzel E
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: BIO-111 0.00
TBA TBA
20
BLS - BLACK STUDIES
BLS-270-01
African Amer Faith Traditions
Lake T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
BLS-270-01 = REL-280-02 African American Faith Traditions. This course will introduce students to the critical study of African American religious practices and traditions. Students will be exposed to the historiography of African American institutional religion (i.e., the history of black churches, temples, etc.) as well as the sectarian rituals and worldviews of worshiping black communities. The aim here is to get a rich understanding of the ways in which the religious life is manifested among black people as they respond to their period, region and social conditions. 1.00
CEN 215
25 21 
BLS-270-02
Intro to African American Lit
Lake T
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
BLS-270-02 = ENG-160-01 Intro to African American Literature. This course will introduce students to the critical study of African American literature as a means of racial identity formation and political and philosophical articulation. Among other things, African American art, literature, music, and cinema reflect an attempt to grapple with issues of human psychology, justice, love, race, and democracy. Moreover, it is these issues that form the major themes of the course. 1.00
CEN 215
25 22 
BLS-270-03
Edu Policy & Evaluation
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
BLS-270-03 = EDU-240-01 = PSC-210-02 : Educational Policy and Evaluation. This course examines educational policy at the federal and state levels. We will explore the role of educational policy in guiding educational evaluation, with particular focus upon the use-and abuse-of statistical approaches to the evaluation of teaching and learning. After an introduction to the assumptions underlying qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods designs for educational research, the focus turns to the ways in which teaching and learning processes are understood and measured in public education. Standardized testing and common practices such as "quantitizing" qualitative data are examined for their assumptions and limitations in educational settings. The goal of the course is the development of quantitative skills and literacies needed for critical participation in public discussions and decision-making about these metrics as tools for diagnosis and reform in public education. In particular, students will be prepared to better evaluate political debate and news coverage related to the assessment of teaching and learning. Calculation of descriptive statistics commonly used in classroom assessments and in standardized educational measures, including those with normal and with skewed distributions, is taught using Excel. Substantial practice is devoted to representation and interpretation of quantitative data, using Excel's graphing and charting functions. 1.00
MXI 214
18 18 
BLS-270-04
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
BLS-270-04 = EDU-201-01 = PHI-299-02 = PPE-228-03. This class will examine foundational questions about education (e.g., What is the nature and purpose of education?) with a particular focus upon the role of public schools in a democratic society. We will read and watch texts drawn from philosophy, as well as from literature and history, as we consider the nature of teaching and learning at the classroom level and within the broader society. Issues addressed typically include: tensions between individual students' development and the needs of the broader society; the role of the educational system in a diverse and multicultural society; the nature and goals of classroom relationship (teacher/student and student/student); and approaches to educational reform. Level: Open to any student; required of all Education Studies minors. Students interested in the secondary licensure program are encouraged to take EDU 201 in the sophomore year. Offered fall and spring semesters. 1.00
DET 112
18 18 
BLS-270-05
World Music
Makubuya J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
BLS-270-05 = MUS-102-01 : World Music. An introduction to the various world musical cultures and practices found outside the Western Classical Art tradition. The course gives an overview of music genres, instrumental types and resources, forms, and styles that originate from selected world music traditions in sub-Saharan Africa, Arabic Africa, Middle East, Near East, North America, South/Latin America, and the Caribbean region. Musical practices are studied in terms of structure, performance, aesthetic values, cross-cultural contacts, contextual function, and significance. Coursework includes weekly reading and listening assignments, musical demonstrations, and hands-on experience, as well as the acquisition and development of listening skills. This course is open to all students, is suitable for fulfilling distribution requirements, and is offered in the fall semester. 1.00
FIN M120
20 19 
BLS-300-01
History of Mass Incarceration
Thomas S
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
BLS-300-01 = HIS-340-01 = PSC-210-03 : Race, Gender, Class and Punishment in America: A History of Mass Incarceration. The more than two million people incarcerated in the United States, constitute the largest prison population in the world. African Americans and Latinos comprise a disproportionate number of these prisoners and female imprisonment has outpaced men by 50% since 1980. (The Sentencing Project) The "prison industrial complex" has produced enormous profits for private prison corporations, growing deficits for state and local governments, and social crises in those communities targeted by systematic policing and imprisonment. It has also generated public and scholarly debates about the history, ethics, and function of mass incarceration. This course will examine the evolution of the "prison industrial complex" in the United States, from its antecedents in slavery and in the prison systems of the nineteenth-century, to the rise of mental institutions and prisons for profit during the twentieth-century. Throughout the course we will consider the relationship of race, gender, class and punishment at various moments in American history. Course readings will draw on the work of historians, sociologists, anthropologists, and lawyers, and will incorporate various experiential activities and other prisms through which to evaluate the culture of prison and punishment in American society. 1.00
BAX 201
15 15 
BLS-300-02
South African Literature
Brewer A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
BLS-300-02 = ENG-497-01 : South African Literature. In this course, we will focus on South African authors writing in the context of colonization, Apartheid, and the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. How did the writers and poets describe conflicts between assimilation and resistance in the colonial and postcolonial setting? How were the tribal, national, cultural, and individual identities affected by decades of foreign imperial presence and the Apartheid regime? Can we trace any intersections between South African writers' response to Apartheid and North American writers' response to Jim Crow and, more recently, to Ferguson? To understand and enjoy the texts, we will also study the historical and political contexts of Dutch and British imperialism and the anti-Apartheid resistance. The authors we will read include Sol Plaatje, Steve Biko, Nadine Gordimer, Bessie Head, Richard Rive, Zoƫ Wicomb, JM Coetzee, Zakes Mda, Thando Mgqolozana, Koleka Putuma, and others. 1.00
CEN 304
15 15 
BLS-300-03
African-American Crime Fiction
M. Lambert
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
BLS-300-03 = ENG-300-01 : African-American Crime Fiction This course will trace the development of the African-American crime fiction genre from the end of World War II to the present. Starting with the hardboiled crime novels of Chester Himes, we will examine ways that African-American authors, filmmakers, and musicians have used black detectives and/or criminals to challenge misconceptions about black criminality in the U.S. We will particularly focus on the development of the crime genre in relation to major historical movements and events in post-World War II African-American experience-from the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements to #BlackLivesMatter. 1.00
CEN 305
15 13 
CHE - CHEMISTRY
CHE-101-01
Survey of Chemistry
Wysocki L, J. Ross
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Co-Requisite: CHE-101L 1.00
HAY 319
40
CHE-101L-01
Survey Chemistry Lab
Schmitt P
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-101 0.00
TBA TBA
20
CHE-101L-02
Survey Chemistry Lab
J. Ross
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-101 0.00
TBA TBA
20
CHE-111-01
General Chemistry I
Porter L
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111L 1.00
HAY 002
40 22 
CHE-111L-01
General Chemistry Lab
Porter L
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111 0.00
HAY 315
16
CHE-111L-02
General Chemistry Lab
T. Cook
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111 0.00
HAY 315
16
CHE-111L-04
General Chemistry Lab
T. Cook
TH
08:00AM - 11:00AM
Co-Requisite: CHE-111 0.00
HAY 315
16
CHI - CHINESE
CHI-101-01
Elementary Chinese I
Li Y
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101L 1.00
DET 220
20 14 
CHI-101L-01
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
M
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101 0.00
DET 211
5
CHI-101L-02
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101 0.00
DET 211
5
CHI-101L-03
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
TU
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101 0.00
DET 112
5
CHI-101L-04
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Co-Requisite: CHI-101 0.00
DET 112
5
CLA - CLASSICS
CLA-101-01
Classical Mythology
M. Gorey
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
HAY 104
60
CLA-103-01
Greek Art & Archaeology
Wickkiser B
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CLA-103-01 = ART-103: Greek Art and Archaeology. 1.00
HAY 319
35 14 
CLA-240-01
Ancient Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CLA-240-01 = PHI-240-01 1.00
CEN 215
25 22 
DV1 - DIVISION I
DV1-277-01
Epidemiology
T. Hodges
M
02:10PM - 03:50PM
W
02:10PM - 03:00PM
DV1-277-01 = GHL-277-01. 1st Half Semester. Global Health students with no prior credit in Epidemiology must take both sections 1 and 2 of DV1-277 to meet their requirement. Scheduled time of MW 2:10-3:25PM is tentative. 0.50
HAY 001
HAY 001
12
DV1-277-02
Epidemiology
Wetzel E
M
02:10PM - 03:50PM
W
02:10PM - 03:00PM
DV1-277-02 = GHL-277-02. 2nd Half Semester. Global Health students with no prior credit in Epidemiology must take both sections 1 and 2 of DV1-277 to meet their requirement. Scheduled time of MW 2:10-3:25PM is tentative. 0.50
HAY 001
HAY 001
12 10 
DV3 - DIVISION III
DV3-252-01
Stats Soc Sciences
Byun C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
2nd Half Semester. 0.50
BAX 214
28
DV3-252-02
Stats Soc Sciences
Byun C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
2nd Half Semester. 0.50
BAX 214
29
ECO - ECONOMICS
ECO-101-01
Princ of Economics
E. Dunaway
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
BAX 214
25
ECO-101-02
Princ of Economics
Snow N
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
DET 209
25
ECO-101-04
Princ of Economics
Snow N
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
BAX 202
25
EDU - EDUCATION
EDU-101-01
Intro Child & Adolescent Devel
Pittard M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
DET 209
20
EDU-201-01
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
EDU-201-01 = PHI-299-02 = BLS-270-04 = PPE-228-03 1.00
DET 112
18
EDU-230-01
Studies in Rural Education
Pittard M
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
2nd Half Semester. Studies in Rural Education: According to the Center for Public Education "Approximately half the school districts in the United States are located in rural areas," yet urban and suburban schools attract most of the nation's attention both in terms of policy and academia. This course offers an introduction to rural education with attention to some of the most pressing issues facing rural schools: state and federal funding, the viability of popular reform initiatives, curricular programs including vocational education, teacher shortages, access to technology, and poverty. 0.50
MXI 214
15 10 
EDU-240-01
Educational Policy & Eval
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
EDU-240-01 = BLS-270-03 = PSC-210-02. 1.00
MXI 214
18
EDU-314-01
Theory and Practice of Peer Tu
Koppelmann Z
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
EDU-314-01 = ENG-314-01 1.00
BAX 114
10
EDU-370-01
Soc Stud Ed for Democ Citizshp
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
EDU-370-01 = HIS-240-01 : 1st Half Semester. Social Studies Education for Democratic Citizenship. This course examines the ways in which history educationin the U.S. must grapple with complex historic contentif it is to prepare citizens for active democratic engagement. Topics and events we will consider include those that may be omitted entirely or glossed over as to messy or difficult. Topics will be drawn from among the following in response to students' interests: U.S. immigration and exclusion policies acrosstime; racial oppression of minoritizedpeoples including race riots, lynchings, and mass killings; the extension of the franchiseto members of minority groups and to women; treaty negotiations and sovereignty issues for Native peoples; the elaboration of individual rights and freedoms; and the complex history of Charles Lindbergh, Henry Ford, and the U.S. fascist movement. 0.50
MXI 214
13
ENG - ENGLISH
ENG-101-01
Composition
Brewer A
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
BAX 201
15
ENG-101-03
Composition
Mong D
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
MXI 213
15
ENG-101-04
Composition
M. Lambert
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
CEN 305
15
ENG-101-06
Composition
M. Lambert
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
CEN 304
15
ENG-105-01
Intro to Poetry
Aikens N
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1st Half Semester. 0.50
CEN 304
30 18 
ENG-106-01
Intro. to Short Fiction
Aikens N
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
2nd Half Semester. 0.50
CEN 304
30 16 
ENG-110-01
Intro to Creative Writing
Freeze E
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
CEN 215
25
ENG-160-01
Intro to African American Lit
Lake T
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ENG-160-01 = BLS-270-02 Intro to African American Literature. This course will introduce students to the critical study of African American literature as a means of racial identity formation and political and philosophical articulation. Among other things, African American art, literature, music, and cinema reflect an attempt to grapple with issues of human psychology, justice, love, race, and democracy. Moreover, it is these issues that form the major themes of the course. 1.00
CEN 215
25 23 
ENG-202-01
Writing With Power and Grace
Freeze, R
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
1.00
CEN 305
15
ENG-216-01
Intro to Shakespeare
Aikens N
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
CEN 300
15 12 
ENG-219-01
Amer Lit before 1900
Mong D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
CEN 215
30 18 
ENG-297-01
Intro to the Study of Lit
Benedicks C
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
CEN 300
25 18 
ENG-314-01
Theory and Practice of Peer Tu
Koppelmann Z
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
ENG-314-01 = EDU-314-01 1.00
BAX 114
10
FRE - FRENCH
FRE-101-01
Elementary French I
Quandt K
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Co-requisite: FRE-101L 1.00
DET 209
24
FRE-101L-01
Elementary French 1 Lab
Staff
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-101 0.00
DET 211
6
FRE-101L-02
Elementary French 1 Lab
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-requisite: FRE-101 0.00
DET 209
6
FRE-101L-04
Elementary French 1 Lab
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Co-requisite: FRE-101 0.00
DET 211
6
FRE-201L-02
Intermediate French Lab.
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-201 0.00
DET 211
5
FRE-201L-03
Intermediate French Lab.
Staff
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: FRE-201 0.00
DET 211
5
GEN - GENDER STUDIES
GEN-105-01
Fatherhood
Olofson E
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
GEN-105-01 = PSY-105-01 1.00
CEN 216
40 26 
GEN-200-01
Feminist Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
GEN-200-01 = PHI-219-02 = PPE-228-02 : Topics in Ethics and Social Phil: Feminist Philosophy. Feminist philosophy considers the philosophical questions raised by our system of gender. The theme of the course is the meaning of difference. Historical inequality between men and women leads to the question of whether gender difference between men and women can be thought without hierarchy. This course considers numerous aspects and issues involved in these questions including how differences intersect in history and thought, whether men and women have different timeless and universal essences, whether philosophy's claim to knowledge is itself marked by gendered assumptions, what the role of pornography is in producing difference and inequality is and how the trans experience informs these questions. The last part of the course involves a philosophical examination of multiple feminist approaches -liberal feminism, difference feminism, radical feminism, Marxist feminism, Black feminism / womanism, and transnational feminism --to these issues. 1.00
CEN 304
18 17 
GER - GERMAN
GER-101-01
Elementary German I
J. Vanderkolk
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Co-requisite: GER-101L 1.00
DET 111
18
GER-101-02
Elementary German I
J. Vanderkolk
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Co-requisite: GER-101L 1.00
DET 111
18
GER-101L-02
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
TU
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Co-requisite: GER-101 0.00
DET 212
6
GER-101L-03
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
TU
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Co-requisite: GER-101 0.00
DET 212
6
GER-101L-04
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-requisite: GER-101 0.00
DET 212
6
GER-101L-05
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
TH
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Co-requisite: GER-101 0.00
DET 212
6
GER-101L-06
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
TH
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-requisite: GER-101 0.00
DET 212
6
GER-201L-01
Intermediate German Lab.
Staff
TU
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Co-requisite: GER-201 0.00
DET 209
6
GER-201L-02
Intermediate German Lab.
Staff
TU
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Co-requisite: GER-201 0.00
DET 212
6
GER-201L-03
Intermediate German Lab.
Staff
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-requisite: GER-201 0.00
DET 212
5
GER-201L-04
Intermediate German Lab.
Staff
TH
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Co-requisite: GER-201 0.00
DET 209
5
GER-377-01
Spe Topics:German Lit&Culture
A. Fisher
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
 
GHL - GLOBAL HEALTH
GHL-107-01
Health Psychology
Gunther K
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
GHL-107 = PSY-107 1.00
BAX 311
25 19 
GHL-219-01
Environmental Philosophy
Gower J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
GHL-219-01 = PHI-219-01 = PPE-228-01 : Topics in Ethics and Social Phil: Environmental Philosophy. This course will first introduce some common approaches to environmental ethics by considering the question of the moral status of nonhuman animals. For example, we will examine debates between utilitarian and Kantian moral theorists by asking whether nonhuman animals have moral and legal status, and whether nonhuman animals and ecosystems have intrinsic value or are merely valuable insofar as they are useful to human beings. We will then ask whether these common approaches to environmental ethics are adequate to the task of responding to the challenge of global climate change. Examining the political, economic, and ethical dimensions of climate change reveals at least one basic challenge to standard approaches to moral theory: the massive scale of potential harm-counted not only in terms ofharm to human communities, like displacement, forced migration, poverty, hunger, and deleterious health effects that follow, but also in terms of harms to nonhuman animals like species extinction and ecosystem collapse-confounds standard accounts of moraland legal responsibility. Appreciating the severity of this problem invites us to reconsider how human beings are situated in nature and to explore alternative approaches to environmental ethics and to human dwelling. 1.00
CEN 300
18 16 
GHL-235-01
Health Economics
Howland F
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
GHL-235 = ECO-235 = PPE-255 : Health Economics. 1.00
BAX 214
25 23 
GHL-277-01
Epidemiology
T. Hodges
M
02:10PM - 03:50PM
W
02:10PM - 03:00PM
GHL-277-01 = DV1-277-01. 1st Half Semester. Global Health students with no prior credit in Epidemiology must take both sections 1 and 2 of DV1-277 to meet their requirement. Scheduled time of MW 2:10-3:25PM is tentative. 0.50
HAY 001
HAY 001
12
GHL-277-02
Epidemiology
Wetzel E
M
02:10PM - 03:50PM
W
02:10PM - 03:00PM
GHL-277-02 = DV1-277-02. 2nd Half Semester. Global Health students with no prior credit in Epidemiology must take both sections 1 and 2 of DV1-277 to meet their requirement. 0.50
HAY 001
HAY 001
12
GRK - GREEK
GRK-101-01
Beginning Greek I
Wickkiser B
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Co-requisite: GRK-101L 1.00
DET 111
 
GRK-101L-01
Beginning Greek I
Wickkiser B
TBA
TBA - TBA
Co-requisite: GRK-101 0.00
TBA TBA
 
HIS - HISTORY
HIS-101-01
World History to 1500
S. Kunze
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
BAX 202
40
HIS-200-01
US/Russian Foreign Relations
S. Kunze
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
History US-Russian Foreign Relation. In this course, we will examine how US-Russian foreign relations developed in the past hundred years, from the Russian Revolution to the present. You will learn about key moments in the development of an American diplomatic relationship with Russia, and evaluate competing theories about the social, political, ideological, and economic factors that shaped that relationship. 1.00
BAX 311
25 12 
HIS-220-01
European Music Before 1750
Ables M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HIS-220-01 = MUS-205-01 : European Music Before 1750. The rise of European art music from religious and folk traditions; Gregorian chant and early polyphonic genres; the growth of polyphony in mass, motet, and madrigal; early instrumental music; European genres of the 17th and 18th centuries: opera, oratorio, cantata, concerto, suite, sonata, keyboard music. Some emphasis on the music of J.S. Bach. This course is offered in the spring semester of 2017 and again in the fall of 2019. 1.00
FIN A131
15 15 
HIS-230-01
The Holocaust: His/Pol/Represe
Hollander E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HIS-230-01 = PSC-328-01 = GER-312-01 = HUM-277-01 The Holocaust: History, Politics, and Representation. This course examines the Holocaust from historical, political, and cultural perspectives. While we will focus on the history of the event itself, from the rise of Nazism in the 1930s to the end of World War II, we will also devote significant attention to representations, reflections, and portrayals of the Holocaust in the world since. While the Holocaust ended in 1945, Holocaust history continues to the present day. World leaders are routinely called 'Nazis' by those who disagree with them, and episodes of human suffering -from warfare, oppression, or even natural disasters - are often compared with the Nazi genocide and (rightly or wrongly) seen through its lens. The Holocaust, usually defined as the systematic attempt by Nazi Germany and its allies to eliminate the Jews of Europe, has clearly expanded beyond its strict historical setting to become a defining event in the global human experience. Students will explore how the Holocaust is portrayed from various perspectives and how responses to the Holocaust have changed over time. This interdisciplinary course has no prerequisites and is open to students of any major. Students may apply the course toward distribution requirements in behavioral science; literature and fine arts; or history, philosophy, and religion. It also counts towards the PPE major's diversity requirement. 1.00
GOO 006
14 10 
HIS-232-01
20th Century Europe
Rhoades M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
GOO 104
25
HIS-240-01
Soc Stud Ed for Democ Citizshp
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
EDU-370-01 = HIS-240-01 : 1st Half Semester. Social Studies Education for Democratic Citizenship. This course examines the ways in which history educationin the U.S. must grapple with complex historic contentif it is to prepare citizens for active democratic engagement. Topics and events we will consider include those that may be omitted entirely or glossed over as to messy or difficult. Topics will be drawn from among the following in response to students' interests: U.S. immigration and exclusion policies acrosstime; racial oppression of minoritizedpeoples including race riots, lynchings, and mass killings; the extension of the franchiseto members of minority groups and to women; treaty negotiations and sovereignty issues for Native peoples; the elaboration of individual rights and freedoms; and the complex history of Charles Lindbergh, Henry Ford, and the U.S. fascist movement. 0.50
MXI 214
12
HIS-241-01
United States to 1865
Thomas S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
MXI 109
26
HIS-260-01
Premodern China
Healey C
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
HIS-260-01 = ASI-112-01 - Topics in Asian Culture: Premodern China. This survey course introduces Chinese history and cultural traditions from ancient times to 1911, outlining historical trends such as Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, dynastic cycles, literati culture, traditional gender roles, and interactions with the West. We will analyze a variety of primary sources (in translation), including poetry, fiction, philosophical writings, historical records, and visual art. No pre-requisites. May be taken as Literature/Fine Arts (ASI-112) or History/Philosophy/Religion (HIS-260). 1.00
DET 112
25 17 
HIS-260-02
Global Chinese Cinemas
Healey C
M F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
W
02:10PM - 04:00PM
HIS-260-02 = ASI-177-01. This course traces major trends in Chinese cinema, including works from mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. We will analyze films from multiple angles, including aesthetics, historical context, production, and circulation. In particular, we will focus on tensions between nationalism and transnationalism in Chinese cinema. Film screenings in class Wednesdays. May be taken as Literature/Fine Arts (ASI- 177) or History/Philosophy/Religion (HIS-260) 1.00
DET 109
DET 109
25 24 
HSP - HISPANIC STUDIES
HSP-250-01
History of Mexico City
Warner R
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
HSP-250-01 = HIS-350-01 - LA CAPITAL: History of Mexico City. Immersion Trip. Registration through instructor only. This course covers the long history of the area today known as Mexico City, or Distrito Federal (DF). Complex civilizations have inhabited this region for over 2000 years, since before the time of the Aztecs (Mexica) until the present, as the world's second largest urban area. Clashes and fusions between cultures have defined the history of the region, creating a complex and fascinating social tapestry today. In addition to engagement with primary and secondary sources, students will author a term paper about a subject of their choice. Over Thanksgiving Break the class will travel to Mexico City to further investigate historical elements of the region. No Prerequisites. Students selected by application. 1.00
MXI 214
16 15 
HUM - HUMANITIES
HUM-196-01
Classical Chinese Poetry
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HUM-196-01 = REL-196-01 = ASI-196-01 : 2nd Half Semester. "Dancing with the Moon": Religion and Image in Chinese Poetry. "In the heart, it's intention; coming forth in words, it's poetry." So says the "Preface" to the Book of Songs, the ancient classic of Chinese poetry. In this course, we will read selections (in English) from the Book of Songs, and later poets like Li Bo [Li Bai], Du Fu, and Wang Wei. We will study how Chinese poets use image and metaphor to convey their distinctive ideas about nature, religion, and human life. On occasion, we will also read Chinese poems alongside selected English-language poems, comparing their techniques and aims. 0.5 credits. For first half semester at 9:45 TTH, see REL-275. 0.50
MXI 109
20 19 
HUM-277-01
The Holocaust: His/Pol/Represe
Hollander E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HUM-277-01 = PSC-328-01 = HIS-230-01 = GER-312-01 The Holocaust: History, Politics, and Representation. This course examines the Holocaust from historical, political, and cultural perspectives. While we will focus on the history of the event itself, from the rise of Nazism in the 1930s to the end of World War II, we will also devote significant attention to representations, reflections, and portrayals of the Holocaust in the world since. While the Holocaust ended in 1945, Holocaust history continues to the present day. World leaders are routinely called 'Nazis' by those who disagree with them, and episodes of human suffering -from warfare, oppression, or even natural disasters - are often compared with the Nazi genocide and (rightly or wrongly) seen through its lens. The Holocaust, usually defined as the systematic attempt by Nazi Germany and its allies to eliminate the Jews of Europe, has clearly expanded beyond its strict historical setting to become a defining event in the global human experience. Students will explore how the Holocaust is portrayed from various perspectives and how responses to the Holocaust have changed over time. This interdisciplinary course has no prerequisites and is open to students of any major. Students may apply the course toward distribution requirements in behavioral science; literature and fine arts; or history, philosophy, and religion. It also counts towards the PPE major's diversity requirement. 1.00
GOO 006
12 10 
LAT - LATIN
LAT-101-01
Beginning Latin I
M. Gorey
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: LAT-101L 1.00
DET 111
 
LAT-101L-01
Beginning Latin
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: LAT-101 0.00
DET 111
 
LAT-101L-02
Beginning Latin
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-Requisite: LAT-101 0.00
DET 111
 
MAT - MATHEMATICS
MAT-010-01
Pre-Calc. With Intro to Calc.
Turner W
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Enrollment through instructor only. Prerequisite: MAT-010 placement 1.00
HAY 003
30
MAT-108-01
Intro to Discrete Structures
Westphal C
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
GOO 104
30 12 
MAT-111-01
Calculus I
Z. Gates
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00
BAX 214
24 10 
MAT-111-02
Calculus I
Z. Gates
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
HAY 003
30
MAT-111-03
Calculus I
Ansaldi K
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
GOO 101
24
MAT-111-04
Calculus I
McKinney C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
HAY 003
30 12 
MUS - MUSIC
MUS-053-01
Glee Club (No Credit)
K. Millington
M TU W TH
04:15PM - 06:00PM
0.00
FIN CONC
 
MUS-101-01
Music in Society: A History
Makubuya J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
FIN M120
 
MUS-102-01
World Music
Makubuya J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
MUS-102-01 = BLS-270-05 1.00
FIN M120
20 13 
MUS-104-01
History & Philosophy of Music
Carlson M, Ables M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
MUS 104 = PHI-299-01 : History and Philosophy of Music. In the West, music and philosophy have exerted influence upon one another from Antiquity to the present day. In this course, we will survey relationships and mutual interactions between music and philosophy throughout history. Central questions of the course will include: What is the relationship between music and the emotions? Is music the language of the emotions? For that matter, is music a language at all? What do works of music mean, and how do they have these meanings? We will address these questions by analyzing the nature of music, aesthetics, and composition using specific case studies from Western music history and philosophy. In so doing, we will seek to understand relationships between different modes of philosophical thinking and musical styles. This class is co-taught by professors from the philosophy and music departments, and it has no prerequisites. No background in either music or philosophy is required to participate in this course. 1.00
FIN M140
35 33 
MUS-107-01
Basic Theory and Notation
Renk C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
FIN M140
22
MUS-151-01
Brass Ensemble
Downey C
W
07:00PM - 08:30PM
0.00
TBA TBA
15 11 
MUS-152-01
Chamber Orchestra
Abel A
M
04:15PM - 05:45PM
0.00
FIN M114
15 13 
MUS-153-01
Glee Club
K. Millington
M TU W TH
04:15PM - 06:00PM
0.00
FIN CONC
45 13 
MUS-155-01
Jazz Ensemble
Pazera C
TU
07:00PM - 09:00PM
0.00
FIN M114
15 11 
MUS-156-01
Wamidan World Music Ensemble
Makubuya J
W F
05:00PM - 06:15PM
0.00
TBA TBA
15 12 
MUS-205-01
European Music Before 1750
Ables M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
MUS-205-01 = HIS-220-01 1.00
FIN A131
15 10 
MUS-221-01
Intro to Electronic Music
Renk C
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
FIN M138
10
PE - PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE-011-01
Advanced Fitness
Brumett K, P. Sullivan
M W F
06:00AM - 07:15AM
1st half semester. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
PE-011-02
Advanced Fitness
Martin J, Staff
M W F
06:30AM - 07:30AM
2nd Half Semester. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
PE-011-03
Advanced Fitness
Martin J, Staff
M W F
07:30AM - 08:30AM
2nd Half Semester. 0.00
TBA TBA
 
PHI - PHILOSOPHY
PHI-109-01
Humans in the Age of Robots
Trott A
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Perspectives on Philosophy: Humans in the Age of Robots. This course will consider different conceptions of what it means to be human drawn from the history of philosophy and then pair each conception with a challenge brought about by existing, planned and imagined technology of robots. The guiding question of the course is whether technological advances in robots and algorithms have made it impossible for us to successfully distinguish between human beings and non-human beings as philosophers have long tried to do. Technology poses some challenges to us in the way that we use "the cloud" and our smart phones as extensions of ourselves. It also poses challenges in the ways that AI is learning to think and robots come to resemble humans physically more and more. We will ask what the implications are for human life if this distinction is no longer possible. Students will read selections from Aristotle, Augustine, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Hegel, Arendt and Foucault as well as contemporary theorists of technology and watch films and television shows including Ex Machina and Black Mirror episodes. 1.00
GOO 006
18
PHI-109-02
Persp. on Phil: Friendship
Hughes C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1st Half Semester. Perspectives on Philosophy: Friendship. What are friends for? Who do we count among our friends? What are the ethical benefits and ethical dilemmas that occur in friendship? How do friendships contribute to our character and identity? What is the role of friendship in a good life? We will explore some of the ways philosophers have tried to answer these questions beginning with Aristotle and moving historically through such thinkers as Cicero, Seneca, Montaigne, and C.S. Lewis as well as several contemporary philosophers who are taking a renewed interest in friendship. We will also use film, case studies, and our own experiences to test philosophical analyses and deepen our understanding of friendship. This is a half-credit introductory course in philosophy; no prerequisite. 0.50
CEN 305
16
PHI-219-01
Environmental Philosophy
Gower J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PHI-219-01 = PPE-228-01 = GHL-219-01 : Topics in Ethics and Social Phil: Environmental Philosophy. This course will first introduce some common approaches to environmental ethics by considering the question of the moral status of nonhuman animals. For example, we will examine debates between utilitarian and Kantian moral theorists by asking whether nonhuman animals have moral and legal status, and whether nonhuman animals and ecosystems have intrinsic value or are merely valuable insofar as they are useful to human beings. We will then ask whether these common approaches to environmental ethics are adequate to the task of responding to the challenge of global climate change. Examining the political, economic, and ethical dimensions of climate change reveals at least one basic challenge to standard approaches to moral theory: the massive scale of potential harm-counted not only in terms ofharm to human communities, like displacement, forced migration, poverty, hunger, and deleterious health effects that follow, but also in terms of harms to nonhuman animals like species extinction and ecosystem collapse-confounds standard accounts of moraland legal responsibility. Appreciating the severity of this problem invites us to reconsider how human beings are situated in nature and to explore alternative approaches to environmental ethics and to human dwelling. 1.00
CEN 300
18
PHI-219-02
Feminist Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PHI-219-02 = GEN-200-01 = PPE-228-02 : Topics in Ethics and Social Phil: Feminist Philosophy. Feminist philosophy considers the philosophical questions raised by our system of gender. The theme of the course is the meaning of difference. Historical inequality between men and women leads to the question of whether gender difference between men and women can be thought without hierarchy. This course considers numerous aspects and issues involved in these questions including how differences intersect in history and thought, whether men and women have different timeless and universal essences, whether philosophy's claim to knowledge is itself marked by gendered assumptions, what the role of pornography is in producing difference and inequality is and how the trans experience informs these questions. The last part of the course involves a philosophical examination of multiple feminist approaches -liberal feminism, difference feminism, radical feminism, Marxist feminism, Black feminism / womanism, and transnational feminism --to these issues. 1.00
CEN 304
18 12 
PHI-240-01
Ancient Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
PHI-240-01 = CLA-240-01 1.00
CEN 215
25
PHI-270-01
Elem Symbolic Logic
Carlson M
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
CEN 216
35
PHI-299-01
History & Philosophy of Music
Carlson M, Ables M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PHI 299-01 = MUS 104 : History and Philosophy of Music. In the West, music and philosophy have exerted influence upon one another from Antiquity to the present day. In this course, we will survey relationships and mutual interactions between music and philosophy throughout history. Central questions of the course will include: What is the relationship between music and the emotions? Is music the language of the emotions? For that matter, is music a language at all? What do works of music mean, and how do they have these meanings? We will address these questions by analyzing the nature of music, aesthetics, and composition using specific case studies from Western music history and philosophy. In so doing, we will seek to understand relationships between different modes of philosophical thinking and musical styles. This class is co-taught by professors from the philosophy and music departments, and it has no prerequisites. No background in either music or philosophy is required to participate in this course. 1.00
FIN M140
35 31 
PHI-299-02
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
PHI-299-02 = EDU-201-01 = BLS-270-04 = PPE-228-03. This class will examine foundational questions about education (e.g., What is the nature and purpose of education?) with a particular focus upon the role of public schools in a democratic society. We will read and watch texts drawn from philosophy, as well as from literature and history, as we consider the nature of teaching and learning at the classroom level and within the broader society. Issues addressed typically include: tensions between individual students' development and the needs of the broader society; the role of the educational system in a diverse and multicultural society; the nature and goals of classroom relationship (teacher/student and student/student); and approaches to educational reform. Level: Open to any student; required of all Education Studies minors. Students interested in the secondary licensure program are encouraged to take EDU 201 in the sophomore year. Offered fall and spring semesters. 1.00
DET 112
18 18 
PHY - PHYSICS
PHY-101-01
Astronomy
J. Ross
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Co-Requisite: PHY-101L 1.00
HAY 003
21
PHY-109-01
Motion and Waves
N. Tompkins
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Co-Requisite: PHY-109L 1.00
GOO 104
44
PHY-109L-01
Motion and Waves Lab
N. Tompkins
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-109 0.00
GOO 205
23
PHY-109L-02
Motion and Waves Lab
Brown J
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-109 0.00
GOO 205
23
PHY-111L-01
General Physics Lab
Krause D
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-111 0.00
TBA TBA
20 10 
PHY-111L-02
General Physics Lab
Krause D
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: PHY-111 0.00
GOO 201
20
PHY-381-01
Advanced Laboratory I
Brown J
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
0.50
GOO 306
20 20 
PPE - PHILOSOPHY POLITICS ECONOMICS
PPE-218-01
Philosophy of Commerce
Gower J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PPE-218-01 = PHI-218-01 1.00
CEN 216
30 27 
PPE-228-01
Environmental Philosophy
Gower J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Topics in Ethics and Social Phil: Environmental Philosophy. This course will first introduce some common approaches to environmental ethics by considering the question of the moral status of nonhuman animals. For example, we will examine debates between utilitarian and Kantian moral theorists by asking whether nonhuman animals have moral and legal status, and whether nonhuman animals and ecosystems have intrinsic value or are merely valuable insofar as they are useful to human beings. We will then ask whether these common approaches to environmental ethics are adequate to the task of responding to the challenge of global climate change. Examining the political, economic, and ethical dimensions of climate change reveals at least one basic challenge to standard approaches to moral theory: the massive scale of potential harm-counted not only in terms ofharm to human communities, like displacement, forced migration, poverty, hunger, and deleterious health effects that follow, but also in terms of harms to nonhuman animals like species extinction and ecosystem collapse-confounds standard accounts of moraland legal responsibility. Appreciating the severity of this problem invites us to reconsider how human beings are situated in nature and to explore alternative approaches to environmental ethics and to human dwelling. 1.00
CEN 300
18 13 
PPE-228-02
Feminist Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PPE-228-02 = PHI 219-02 = GEN-200-01 : Topics in Ethics and Social Phil: Feminist Philosophy. Feminist philosophy considers the philosophical questions raised by our system of gender. The theme of the course is the meaning of difference. Historical inequality between men and women leads to the question of whether gender difference between men and women can be thought without hierarchy. This course considers numerous aspects and issues involved in these questions including how differences intersect in history and thought, whether men and women have different timeless and universal essences, whether philosophy's claim to knowledge is itself marked by gendered assumptions, what the role of pornography is in producing difference and inequality is and how the trans experience informs these questions. The last part of the course involves a philosophical examination of multiple feminist approaches -liberal feminism, difference feminism, radical feminism, Marxist feminism, Black feminism / womanism, and transnational feminism --to these issues. 1.00
CEN 304
18 17 
PPE-228-03
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
PPE-228-03 = EDU-201-01 = PHI-299-02 = BLS-270-04. This class will examine foundational questions about education (e.g., What is the nature and purpose of education?) with a particular focus upon the role of public schools in a democratic society. We will read and watch texts drawn from philosophy, as well as from literature and history, as we consider the nature of teaching and learning at the classroom level and within the broader society. Issues addressed typically include: tensions between individual students' development and the needs of the broader society; the role of the educational system in a diverse and multicultural society; the nature and goals of classroom relationship (teacher/student and student/student); and approaches to educational reform. Level: Open to any student; required of all Education Studies minors. Students interested in the secondary licensure program are encouraged to take EDU 201 in the sophomore year. Offered fall and spring semesters. 1.00
DET 112
18 17 
PPE-238-01
The 2020 Census
Gelbman S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PPE-238-01 = PSC-210-01 The 2020 Census. Next year's census - the 24th count of the US population since the first constitutionally mandated census in 1790 - has been called the "most difficult in history."* In addition to perennial concerns about racial and ethnic categories and fierce debates over the inclusion of a new citizenship question, it is the first time the census will be conducted digitally, which has raised questions as to whether sufficient field testing and funding have been provided to ensure an accurate count. This once-in-a-lifetime course will take a deep dive into these and other concerns related to the 2020 Census. We'll place current census politics in historical context, consider why it matters that the population is counted accurately, and explore the diverse range of viewpoints and interests that have been weighing in on 2020 census controversies. Finally, to complement our study of the national-level debates, we'll look at how local governments, which rely very heavily on census data, are preparing for the 2020 census and work with the City of Crawfordsville on its "get out the count" efforts. No prerequisites. *William P. O'Hare and Terri Ann Lowenthal, "The 2020 Census: The Most Difficult in History," Applied Demography Newsletter 28 (2015): 8-10. 1.00
MXI 214
12
PPE-238-02
Tocqueville and Fraternity
McCrary L
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PPE-238-02 = PSC-230-01 : Tocqueville and the Idea of Fraternity in America. Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, written after a year-long trip around America taken in his 20s, is arguably the most important book on democracy and the most important book on America. He identifies the American tradition of forming associations as its saving grace. In addition to studying Tocqueville's travelogue, the class will explore contemporary applications of his ideas of community (and community's failure). How does life in the contemporary world, including our addiction to social media, change the way we associate with others? And what would Tocqueville say about fraternities-can they help revitalize community? 1.00
LIB LSEM
20 16 
PPE-238-03
Arab Israeli Conflict
Wells M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PPE-238-03 = PSC-240-01 Arab-Israeli Conflict. This course introduces students to the history, politics, and diplomacy of the Arab-Israeli conflict. We will begin by examining the conflict's historical origins, beginning in the late 19th Century. Students will understand how competing nationalisms - European Zionism and Arab nationalism - set the groundwork for what was to follow, and how British control following World War I exacerbated tensions between the two groups. The second half of the course will focus on what has transpired since Israel became an independent state in 1947. We will explore the causes and dynamics of the wars (1956, 1967, 1973, 2006) and uprisings (1987-1993, 2000-2005) that have occurred since, as well as efforts to make peace (1993, 2000, 2007) and why recent years have seen very little movement towards a resolution. In doing so, we will examine the role of the United States, Europe, other Middle Eastern countries, and the United Nations. Importantly, the course does not seek to determine which side or group is at fault for the existing state of affairs; rather, it aims to arrive at a common understanding of why the different actors thought and acted as they did. We will do so through by reading and analyzing primary source documents, speeches, interviews, literature, and films. Prerequisites: None. 1.00
BAX 212
15 12 
PPE-333-01
Constitutional Law
Himsel S
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
1.00
BAX 212
20 19 
PSC - POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSC-111-01
Intro to Amer Govt & Politics
Gelbman S
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
BAX 202
30
PSC-121-01
Intro to Comparative Politics
Hollander E
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
BAX 114
40
PSC-131-01
Intro to Political Theory
McCrary L
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
BAX 114
35
PSC-141-01
Intro to Intn'l Relations
Wells M
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
BAX 311
35
PSC-210-01
The 2020 Census
Gelbman S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PSC-210-01 = PPE-238-01 The 2020 Census. Next year's census - the 24th count of the US population since the first constitutionally mandated census in 1790 - has been called the "most difficult in history."* In addition to perennial concerns about racial and ethnic categories and fierce debates over the inclusion of a new citizenship question, it is the first time the census will be conducted digitally, which has raised questions as to whether sufficient field testing and funding have been provided to ensure an accurate count. This once-in-a-lifetime course will take a deep dive into these and other concerns related to the 2020 Census. We'll place current census politics in historical context, consider why it matters that the population is counted accurately, and explore the diverse range of viewpoints and interests that have been weighing in on 2020 census controversies. Finally, to complement our study of the national-level debates, we'll look at how local governments, which rely very heavily on census data, are preparing for the 2020 census and work with the City of Crawfordsville on its "get out the count" efforts. No prerequisites. *William P. O'Hare and Terri Ann Lowenthal, "The 2020 Census: The Most Difficult in History," Applied Demography Newsletter 28 (2015): 8-10. 1.00
MXI 214
12
PSC-210-03
History of Mass Incarceration
Thomas S
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
PSC-210-03 = HIS-340-01 = BLS-300-01 : Race, Gender, Class and Punishment in America: A History of Mass Incarceration. The more than two million people incarcerated in the United States, constitute the largest prison population in the world. African Americans and Latinos comprise a disproportionate number of these prisoners and female imprisonment has outpaced men by 50% since 1980. (The Sentencing Project) The "prison industrial complex" has produced enormous profits for private prison corporations, growing deficits for state and local governments, and social crises in those communities targeted by systematic policing and imprisonment. It has also generated public and scholarly debates about the history, ethics, and function of mass incarceration. This course will examine the evolution of the "prison industrial complex" in the United States, from its antecedents in slavery and in the prison systems of the nineteenth-century, to the rise of mental institutions and prisons for profit during the twentieth-century. Throughout the course we will consider the relationship of race, gender, class and punishment at various moments in American history. Course readings will draw on the work of historians, sociologists, anthropologists, and lawyers, and will incorporate various experiential activities and other prisms through which to evaluate the culture of prison and punishment in American society. 1.00
BAX 201
15 11 
PSC-230-01
Tocqueville and Fraternity
McCrary L
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PSC-230-01 = PPE-238-02 : Tocqueville and the Idea of Fraternity in America. Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, written after a year-long trip around America taken in his 20s, is arguably the most important book on democracy and the most important book on America. He identifies the American tradition of forming associations as its saving grace. In addition to studying Tocqueville's travelogue, the class will explore contemporary applications of his ideas of community (and community's failure). How does life in the contemporary world, including our addiction to social media, change the way we associate with others? And what would Tocqueville say about fraternities-can they help revitalize community? 1.00
LIB LSEM
20 10 
PSC-240-01
Arab Israeli Conflict
Wells M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PSC-240-01 = PPE-238-03 Arab Israeli Conflict. This course introduces students to the history, politics, and diplomacy of the Arab-Israeli conflict. We will begin by examining the conflict's historical origins, beginning in the late 19th Century. Students will understand how competing nationalisms - European Zionism and Arab nationalism - set the groundwork for what was to follow, and how British control following World War I exacerbated tensions between the two groups. The second half of the course will focus on what has transpired since Israel became an independent state in 1947. We will explore the causes and dynamics of the wars (1956, 1967, 1973, 2006) and uprisings (1987-1993, 2000-2005) that have occurred since, as well as efforts to make peace (1993, 2000, 2007) and why recent years have seen very little movement towards a resolution. In doing so, we will examine the role of the United States, Europe, other Middle Eastern countries, and the United Nations. Importantly, the course does not seek to determine which side or group is at fault for the existing state of affairs; rather, it aims to arrive at a common understanding of why the different actors thought and acted as they did. We will do so through by reading and analyzing primary source documents, speeches, interviews, literature, and films. Prerequisites: None 1.00
BAX 212
15
PSC-297-01
Research/Stats-Political Sci
Hollander E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
BAX 214
19
PSC-328-01
Holocaust: His/Pol/Represe
Hollander E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PSC-328-01 = GER-312-01 = HIS-230-01 = HUM-277-01. 1.00
GOO 006
12
PSY - PSYCHOLOGY
PSY-101-01
Introduction to Psychology
N. Muszynski
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
BAX 101
40 12 
PSY-101-02
Introduction to Psychology
Bost P
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Freshman Only. 1.00
BAX 101
40 21 
PSY-105-01
Fatherhood
Olofson E
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PSY-105-01 = GEN-105-01 1.00
CEN 216
40 14 
PSY-107-01
Health Psychology
Gunther K
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
BAX 311
27
PSY-210-01
Evolution, Behavior & Cognit.
N. Muszynski
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
PSY210 - SPECIAL TOPICS: EVOLUTION, BEHAVIOR, AND COGNITION. In this course, we will explore the cognitive, sensory, and behavioral abilities of nonhuman animals. We will review how evolution shaped our current perspective and outlook on animal intelligence and will learn about such topics as the sensory experiences of animals (namely, honeybees, bats, pigeons, dolphins, and chimps), concept formation, time and number, reasoning, social learning, communication and language, navigation, and much more. Such topics will be explored by reading, analyzing, and discussing two books, Do Animals Think? and Animal Cognition. An emphasis will be placed on critically evaluating claims of animal intelligence that can be extended to any type of scientific claim or research that you digest in the future. Although some background on Psychology would help, it is not necessary for this course. 1.00
BAX 311
25 18 
REL - RELIGION
REL-103-01
Islam & the Religions of India
Blix D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
CEN 216
51
REL-141-01
Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Nelson D
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
CEN 215
35
REL-171-01
History Christianity to Reform
E. Yee
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
CEN 216
50 22 
REL-173-01
Introduction to Theology
Nelson D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
CEN 305
20
REL-181-01
Religion in America
Baer J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
CEN 216
50 12 
REL-270-01
Theological Ethics
Bowen S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
CEN 300
15
REL-272-01
Religious Life in Middle Ages
E. Yee
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Christianity calls for its adherents to be different from the world around them. But what if they live in a predominately Christian world? During the medieval period, groups of radical believers broke away from society to live lives purposely structured around God. Desert Fathers retreated into the wilderness, Franciscans begged and preached, Templars fought for God, and Hesychasts pursued visions of divine light. This course explores the dynamics of self-imposed difference and the impact religious countercultures had on society. 0.50
CEN 300
 
REL-280-01
Religion and Health in America
Baer J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
REL-280-01 : Religion and Health in America. In this seminar, we will examine the various ways religious groups in America have understood the body and practiced health, focusing on issues of illness, medicine, healing, and death. Discussions will be based on readings addressing health among a variety of religious adherents. In particular, we will focus on the beliefs and practices of Christian groups in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, as well as contemporary issues and medical research in health and religion. No prerequisites. 1.00
MXI 109
20 11 
REL-280-02
African Amer Faith Traditions
Lake T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
REL-280-02 = BLS-270-01 African American Faith Traditions. This course will introduce students to the critical study of African American religious practices and traditions. Students will be exposed to the historiography of African American institutional religion (i.e., the history of black churches, temples, etc.) as well as the sectarian rituals and worldviews of worshiping black communities. The aim here is to get a rich understanding of the ways in which the religious life is manifested among black people as they respond to their period, region and social conditions. 1.00
CEN 215
25 22 
REL-297-01
Anthropology of Religion
Baer J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Anthropology of Religion. A seminar examining the various ways anthropology describes and interprets religious phenomena. We will study anthropological theories of religion, and focus on how these theories apply to specific religions in diverse contexts. We will pay particular attention to the social and symbolic functions of beliefs and rituals and to the religious importance of myths, symbols, and cosmology. No prerequisites. 1.00
CEN 304
20
RHE - RHETORIC
RHE-101-03
Public Speaking
Geraths C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
FIN FA206
20
RHE-101-04
Public Speaking
Abbott J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
FIN FA206
20
RHE-220-01
Persuasion
Geraths C
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
GOO 104
26
SPA - SPANISH
SPA-101-02
Elementary Spanish I
Gomez G
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-101L 1.00
DET 212
18 10 
SPA-101L-02
Elementary Spanish I Lab
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-101 0.00
DET 128
7
SPA-101L-03
Elementary Spanish I Lab
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-101 0.00
DET 128
7
SPA-101L-04
Elementary Spanish I Lab
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-101 0.00
DET 128
7
SPA-101L-05
Elementary Spanish I Lab
Staff
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-101 0.00
DET 128
8
SPA-103-02
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Rogers D
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Requires SPA-103 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-103L 1.00
DET 112
18
SPA-103L-01
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
TU
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103 0.00
DET 128
7
SPA-103L-04
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103 0.00
DET 128
7
SPA-201L-02
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 209
8
SPA-201L-03
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 220
8
SPA-201L-04
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 220
8
SPA-201L-05
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 209
8
SPA-201L-06
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 209
8
SPA-201L-07
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 212
8
SPA-202L-01
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-202 0.00
DET 111
6
SPA-202L-02
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-202 0.00
DET 212
6
SPA-202L-03
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
TU
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-202 0.00
DET 112
6
SPA-277-01
Special Topics: Lit. & Culture
Rogers D
TBA
TBA - TBA
1st half semester course. Instructor consent required. 0.50
TBA TBA
 
THE - THEATER
THE-101-01
Introduction to Theater
H. Vogel
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
FIN M120
31
THE-201-01
Theater Magic and Manipulation
Bear A
TU TH
08:30AM - 09:15AM
TU TH
09:16AM - 11:00AM
1.00
FIN TGRR
8
THE-206-01
Improvisational Theater
H. Vogel
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
THE 206 Studies in Acting: Improvisational Theater. Improvisation, as seen in television shows like Whose Line Is It Anyway? or the comic sets of Second City or Upright Citizens Brigade, relies on a performer's wit, skill, and connections with collaborators instead of a written text. Whether you find that terrifying or liberating (or both), improv refines an actor's technique through deeper listening, in-the-moment reacting, and the generation of imaginative possibilities. This class will emphasize traditional comedic improv, devising new material, and "Playback" storytelling techniques. 1.00
FIN EXP
15 10 
THE-217-01
The American Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
THE-217-01 = ENG-310-01 1.00
FIN TGRR
15