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21/SP Course Faculty Days Comments/Requisites Credits Course Type Location Capacity Available Seats
ART - ART
ART-210-01
Comics and Graphic Novels
Mong D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ART-210-01=ENG-180-01. Dismissed once as kids' fare or shrugged off as sub-literate-"in the hierarchy of applied arts," Art Spiegelman once wrote, comic books surpass only "tattoo art and sign painting"-comics today are enjoying their Renaissance. In 2015, comics and graphic novel sales topped $1 billon, a 20-year high. Award-winning writers now moonlight for Marvel (Roxanne Gay, Ta-Nehisi Coates) or pen essays on Peanuts (Jonathan Franzen). Superheroes dominate the big screen. In this class, we'll explore this deceptively simple medium as it develops its special abilities. We'll use Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics, a critical text that is itself a comic, to become smart readers of sequential art. Hillary Chute's new book Why Comics? will help us to frame comics's enduring subject matters: sex, the suburbs, disasters, and superheroes. Readings might include Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, selection from the Hernandez Brothers' Love and Rockets, Spiegelman's Maus, Lynda Barry's One! Hundred! Demons!, and works by Daniel Clowes, Harvey Pekar, R. Crumb, Ebony Flowers, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, and others. The course is open to all students; underclassmen are encouraged to enroll. There will be capes and tights.
1.00 LFA
HAY 104
21
ART-210-01F
Comics and Graphic Novels
Mong D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-180-01=ART-210-01=ENG-180-01F=ART-210-01F. Dismissed once as kids' fare or shrugged off as sub-literate-"in the hierarchy of applied arts," Art Spiegelman once wrote, comic books surpass only "tattoo art and sign painting"-comics today are enjoying their Renaissance. In 2015, comics and graphic novel sales topped $1 billon, a 20-year high. Award-winning writers now moonlight for Marvel (Roxanne Gay, Ta-Nehisi Coates) or pen essays on Peanuts (Jonathan Franzen). Superheroes dominate the big screen. In this class, we'll explore this deceptively simple medium as it develops its special abilities. We'll use Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics, a critical text that is itself a comic, to become smart readers of sequential art. Hillary Chute's new book Why Comics? will help us to frame comics's enduring subject matters: sex, the suburbs, disasters, and superheroes. Readings might include Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, selection from the Hernandez Brothers' Love and Rockets, Spiegelman's Maus, Lynda Barry's One! Hundred! Demons!, and works by Daniel Clowes, Harvey Pekar, R. Crumb, Ebony Flowers, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, and others. The course is open to all students; underclassmen are encouraged to enroll. There will be capes and tights.
1.00 LFA
HAY 104
9
ART-210-03D
Representations of Holocaust
Phillips G
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. REL-295-01D=ART-210-03D=HUM-295-01D. This course explores a variety of representations of the Holocaust in theology, literature, film, and art. This interdisciplinary course examines the creative and material work of historians, theologians, novelists, poets, graphic novelists, painters, film makers, composers, photographers, and museum architects. The course explores the limits and possibilities of representing atrocity by raising such questions as: Can suffering be represented? What do representations of the Jewish genocide convey to 21st century citizens and subsequent generations of Jews and Christians? Is it barbaric to write poetry and fiction, paint or compose music, film documentaries and TV comedies, draw cartoons and graphic novels, publish photographs or erect monuments about such horrific events? How does visual media facilitate the raising of profound moral and religious questions about the Holocaust and our responses to it? Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 LFA
TBA TBA
18 10 
ASI - ASIAN STUDIES
ASI-260-01
Central Asia to 1700
Morillo S
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. HIS-260-01=ASI-260-01 This course examines the history of an important but underappreciated region of the world, the Central Asian steppes (grasslands). We will look at the origins of the horse-riding pastoralists who lived there and periodically threatened the sedentary civilizations around the steppes, consider the role of the region as a highway connecting the major sedentary areas commercially (aka "The Silk Road"), and trace the dynamics and chronology of the major steppe political powers that emerged there, including the Scythians whom Herodotus wrote about, the Hsiung Nu of Chinese fame, and the Huns and Turks who took their turns being terrifying to various folk. We will look closely at the climax of all this, the sudden emergence of the Mongols as world conquerors. We will close around 1700, when the steppes ceased to maintain an independent political existence.
1.00 HPR
BAX 202
19 16 
BIO - BIOLOGY
BIO-101-01
Human Biology
Bost A, Chen W, Wetzel E
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Co-Requisite: BIO-101L
1.00 SL, SM
FIN BALL
64
BLS - BLACK STUDIES
BLS-201-01
Introduction to Black Studies
Lake T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. BLS-201-01=ENG-260-01
1.00 LFA, DR
LIB GOODRICH
25
BLS-270-01
BLM: Murder in America
Lake T
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. BLS-270-01=ENG-260-02. This course will introduce students to the contemporary movement for social justice and racial equality and policing reform. In the wake of recent murders of unarmed Black Americans at the hands of law enforcement agents, this course will provide context to the global movement for the recognition and dismantling of structural and systemic racism that denies justice to Black victims of state sanctioned violence. The course will draw upon novels, essays, news articles, social media, political theory and theological texts. These materials will ground class discussions and help to unpack the many ways that race continues to matter. Students will come away with a deeper awareness of how historical racial practices and assumptions continue to impact the life chances of Black people. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 LFA
BAX 212
14
BLS-270-03D
African Art in Hollywood Flim
Morton E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.ART-210-02D=BLS270-03D This course will look at Hollywood films that feature stories, dress, settings, architecture, and art inspired by Africa. It will look at how visual forms from Africa have been used in such varied films as The Black Panther (2018), Coming to America (1988), and Black is King (2020). The focus of the course will be on the original art, architecture, and dress of Africa that is referred to in these films. These African visual forms will be explored as evidence of rituals and beliefs of the various cultural groups that created them.
1.00 LFA
TBA TBA
12 11 
BLS-280-01
Philosophy of Race
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. BLS-280-01=PHI-217-01=PPE-217-01
1.00 HPR, DR
CEN 216
18 17 
BLS-280-02
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. BLS-280-02=EDU-201-01=PPE-228-01
1.00 HPR, DR
HAY 002
14 13 
BLS-300-01
Southern Gothic Literature
Benedicks C
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-310-01=BLS-300-01=GEN-300-01. This class is about the ghosts that haunt the literature of the American South. After the Civil War, when the ideal of the pastoral plantation crumbled, Southern writers sought to contend with the brutal historic realities that had always lurked behind the white-pillared façade: poverty, violence, slavery, racism, patriarchy. Southern Gothic literature-which emerged in the early 19th century and continues strong today-is marked by dark humor, transgressive desires, grotesque violence, folk spiritualism, hereditary sins, emotional and environmental isolation, supernatural forces, and punishing madness. In this class, we will listen to the stories that the ghosts of the American South have told, and still tell today. We'll read the work of authors such as William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Carson McCullers, Tennessee Williams, Richard Wright, Dorothy Allison, Zora Neal Hurston, Toni Morrison, Kristen Arnett, Karen Russell, Gillian Flynn, and Jesmyn Ward. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 HPR
CEN 216
15 11 
BLS-300-02
Law and Literature
Whitney J
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. BLS-300-02=ENG-370-01. What can literature teach us about the relationship between race and law? How can legal texts about race be read as a form of literature? In this course, we will address how literature (both fiction and non-fiction) exposes the way the law negotiates and reinforces systems of race and racism. We will think about the ways in which many literary texts depict the law at work alongside how literature can challenge us to be better interpreters of the law. This course will engage literary texts and legal texts from different time periods with a central focus on how the law highlights and subverts the pursuit of racial justice. Assigned works will include Byran Stevenson Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption and Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. We will also read several legal texts such as Somerset v. Stewart (1772), Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857) and look at Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Assignments will include literary and legal analysis papers, an in-class oral presentation, regular quizzes, and a final research paper. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 HPR
DET 211
7
BLS-300-03
Reconstruction
Thomas S, Himsel S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. SOPHOMORES, JUNIORS AND SENIORS ONLY. HIS-340-01=PSC-310-01=PPE-338-01=BLS-300-03 Americans sought to right the wrongs that caused our bloody Civil War through constitutional amendments abolishing slavery, guaranteeing equal protection of the law, and protecting the right to vote during Reconstruction. Why did these amendments completely fail to achieve their purposes for nearly a century until the Civil Rights Movement of the late 1950s and the 1960s? And to what extent do the failures of Reconstruction continue to plague us today? Can we trace them to today's Black Lives Matter movement or last summer's protests over the death of George Floyd? We will begin our search for answers by trying to recover what freedom, equality, and the right to vote meant both to those who advocated the Reconstruction Amendments and those who strenuously opposed them. We will also examine the "politics of history"-how in the decades after Reconstruction, some tailored the history of that era and the Civil War to support their political agenda in favor of a segregated society. Finally, we will ask whether that distorted history of Reconstruction still affects us today. Is it still "baked" into our legal and political system? These are all critical questions because we still rely upon the Reconstruction Amendments to resolve most of our major civil rights questions, including voting rights, immigrant rights, affirmative action, and LGBTQ rights. We will examine a number of these recent civil rights decisions in light of the understanding we gain about Reconstruction. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 HPR
BAX 114
15 15 
CHE - CHEMISTRY
CHE-241L-01
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Cook T
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Take CHE-241.
0.00
HAY 315
14
CHE-241L-01
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Cook T
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Take CHE-241.
0.00
HAY 315
14
CHE-241L-02
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Porter L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Take CHE-241.
0.00
HAY 315
14
CHE-241L-02
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Porter L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Take CHE-241.
0.00
HAY 315
14
CHE-241L-03
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Cook T
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Take CHE-241.
0.00
HAY 315
14
CHE-241L-03
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Cook T
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Take CHE-241.
0.00
HAY 315
14
CHI - CHINESE
CHI-202-01
Intermediate Chinese II
Li Y
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 FL
DET 220
 
CHI-311-01
Studies in Chinese Language
Li Y
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 FL
DET 112
 
CLA - CLASSICS
CLA-162-01
History & Lit of New Testament
Jay J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. CLA-162=REL-162.
1.00 LFA, HPR
CHA CHAPEL
50 27 
CLA-213-01
Pompeii
Hartnett J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. CLA-213-01=HIS-210-03 Pompeii: Daily Life in a Roman City Destroyed and thus also preserved by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 CE, Pompeii offers an extremely rich document of Roman life. This seminar-style course concentrates on the primary evidence of graffiti, historical documents, wall paintings, artifacts, and other archaeological remains from the world's most famous archaeological site - together with its lesser-known cousin, Herculaneum - to shed light on Roman culture and society. We will explore the experience of everyday Romans across a number of realms: entertainment, politics, commerce, deviance, housing, religion, slavery, leisure, industry, commerce, and many more. In addition to discussion, presentations and several small projects/papers form the backbone of the course.
1.00 LFA, HPR
DET 109
17
CLA-213-01D
Pompeii
Hartnett J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00 LFA, HPR
TBA TBA
1
DV1 - DIVISION I
DV1-178-01
Forensic Chemistry
Porter L
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. The continued popularity of crime scene analysis dramas and literary whodunits reflect society's fascination with criminal investigation. This survey course in chemistry will focus on the theme of forensic science. It is designed for non-science concentrators, which considers the historical and philosophical developments in chemistry, as well as the application of chemical principles to physical phenomena, social issues, and criminalistics. Topics include the development of the atomic theory of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, the chemistry of life (organic and biochemistry), and forensic analysis. Some elementary mathematics will be used. Twolectures and one laboratory each week. Partially fulfills the College laboratory science requirement, but cannot be combined with CHE101 or CHE 111 to complete the laboratory science requirement. This course does not satisfy requirements for the chemistry major or minor Co-requisite: DV1-178L.
1.00 SL, SM
HAY 104
28
ECO - ECONOMICS
ECO-101-01
Principles of Economics
Mikek P
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 BS
FIN CONC
28
EDU - EDUCATION
EDU-230-01
Studies in Rural Education
Pittard M
M W
02:15PM - 03:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. 1ST HALF SEMESTER. According to the Center for Public Education "Approximately half the school districts in the United States are located in rural areas," yet urban and suburban schools attract most of the nation's attention both in terms of policy and academia. This course offers an introduction to rural education with attention to some of the most pressing issues facing rural schools: state and federal funding, the viability of popular reform initiatives, curricular programs including vocational education, teacher shortages, access to technology, diversity, and poverty.
0.50
DET 111
18 11 
ENG - ENGLISH
ENG-109-01
The Divine Comedy
Lamberton J
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Travel with Dante through hell, purgatory, and the celestial sphere-and also deep into the world of Medieval Italy. Dante Alighieri's Divina Commedia (in English, The Divine Comedy), is an epic poem written by a man in crisis. Depressed and driven from his homeland, Dante dedicated a decade of his life to this work, seeking to find meaning in heartbreak, exile, and tragic loss. What is the narrator looking for? Himself. His first love. Home. Revenge. Salvation. God. Each of these answers is correct, yet none is sufficient. Along the way, the poem is unsparing, as it exposes the corruption of politicians, popes, priests, and commoners alike. On this literary journey, we will read about the people, places, beliefs, and questions that moved the spiritual seekers of the Middle Ages, and line them up against the questions that plague our own age. Past students in this course have been surprised and pleased by how Dante's search for moral and ethical clarity-and his boldness in speaking truth to power-has inspired them on their own journeys.
1.00 LFA, LIT
HAY 319
24
ENG-122-01
Modern Linguistics
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. 1ST HALF SEMESTER. ENG-122-01=MLL-122-01=HUM-122-01.
0.50 LS, LANG
GOO 104
26 10 
ENG-180-01
Comics and Graphic Novels
Mong D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-180-01=ART-210-01=ENG-180-01F=ART-210-01F. Dismissed once as kids' fare or shrugged off as sub-literate-"in the hierarchy of applied arts," Art Spiegelman once wrote, comic books surpass only "tattoo art and sign painting"-comics today are enjoying their Renaissance. In 2015, comics and graphic novel sales topped $1 billon, a 20-year high. Award-winning writers now moonlight for Marvel (Roxanne Gay, Ta-Nehisi Coates) or pen essays on Peanuts (Jonathan Franzen). Superheroes dominate the big screen. In this class, we'll explore this deceptively simple medium as it develops its special abilities. We'll use Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics, a critical text that is itself a comic, to become smart readers of sequential art. Hillary Chute's new book Why Comics? will help us to frame comics's enduring subject matters: sex, the suburbs, disasters, and superheroes. Readings might include Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, selection from the Hernandez Brothers' Love and Rockets, Spiegelman's Maus, Lynda Barry's One! Hundred! Demons!, and works by Daniel Clowes, Harvey Pekar, R. Crumb, Ebony Flowers, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, and others. The course is open to all students; underclassmen are encouraged to enroll. There will be capes and tights.
1.00 LFA, LIT
HAY 104
21 13 
ENG-180-01F
Comics and Graphic Novels
Mong D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-180-01=ART-210-01=ENG-180-01F=ART-210-01F. Dismissed once as kids' fare or shrugged off as sub-literate-"in the hierarchy of applied arts," Art Spiegelman once wrote, comic books surpass only "tattoo art and sign painting"-comics today are enjoying their Renaissance. In 2015, comics and graphic novel sales topped $1 billon, a 20-year high. Award-winning writers now moonlight for Marvel (Roxanne Gay, Ta-Nehisi Coates) or pen essays on Peanuts (Jonathan Franzen). Superheroes dominate the big screen. In this class, we'll explore this deceptively simple medium as it develops its special abilities. We'll use Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics, a critical text that is itself a comic, to become smart readers of sequential art. Hillary Chute's new book Why Comics? will help us to frame comics's enduring subject matters: sex, the suburbs, disasters, and superheroes. Readings might include Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, selection from the Hernandez Brothers' Love and Rockets, Spiegelman's Maus, Lynda Barry's One! Hundred! Demons!, and works by Daniel Clowes, Harvey Pekar, R. Crumb, Ebony Flowers, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, and others. The course is open to all students; underclassmen are encouraged to enroll. There will be capes and tights.
1.00 LFA, LIT
HAY 104
9
ENG-180-02
Detective Agency of Wabash
Pavlinich E
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Before every class meeting one character will die. Whodunit? It's up to you, gumshoe. This class will explore the genres of mystery and detective fiction, as well as true crimes recorded in Lilly Library's Special Collections. Students will interact with diverse media, such as poetry, fiction, graphic novels, and film. Combining literary analysis, creative writing, and criminology, each student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to identify culprits, or construct their own ingenious crime-just don't violate the Gentlemen's Rule!
1.00 LFA, LIT
LIB GOODRICH
26
ENG-202-01
Writing With Power and Grace
Whitney J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 LS, LANG
DET 212
15
ENG-211-01
Non-Fiction-The Memoir
Brewer A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. The normal prerequisite of ENG-110 is waived for this course. A memoir essay is a true story that uses some of the tools of fiction. It tells a personal story in pursuit of factual and emotional truths while asking broader questions about memory, human interactions, and more. Our own experiences will be the springboard for developing a well-crafted narrative that will help us generate insightful questions about childhood, education, friendships, and even the current pandemic. This course in creative nonfiction will have a strong workshopping component. In addition, each week we will read memoir essays by James Baldwin, Edwidge Danticat, Zadie Smith, David Sedaris, Alexandar Hemon, and Esmé Weijun Wang. Besides writing personal narratives and reading a variety of texts, students will also be responsible for peer evaluation and critique.
1.00 LS, LANG
CEN 215
15
ENG-214-01D
Intro. British Lit. After 1900
Brewer A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 LFA, LIT
TBA TBA
20 11 
ENG-260-01
Introduction to Black Studies
Lake T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-260-01=BLS-201-01
1.00 LFA, LIT, DR
LIB GOODRICH
25 22 
ENG-260-02
BLM: Murder in America
Lake T
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-260-02=BLS-270-01.This course will introduce students to the contemporary movement for social justice and racial equality and policing reform. In the wake of recent murders of unarmed Black Americans at the hands of law enforcement agents, this course will provide context to the global movement for the recognition and dismantling of structural and systemic racism that denies justice to Black victims of state sanctioned violence. The course will draw upon novels, essays, news articles, social media, political theory and theological texts. These materials will ground class discussions and help to unpack the many ways that race continues to matter. Students will come away with a deeper awareness of how historical racial practices and assumptions continue to impact the life chances of Black people. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 LFA, LIT, DR
BAX 212
14
ENG-270-01
Social Justice Modern France
Quandt K
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-270-01=FRE-277-01 Inspired by the American Revolution and the founding of an independent American republic, French revolutionaries built their model of a new state upon the principals of freedom (la liberté), equality (l'égalité), and fraternity (la fraternité). But, as in the United States, these enshrined ideals have been far from the realities of common experience. Through political treatises, essays, works of literature, and film, this course will trace the paradoxes and contradictions that emerge as the ideal of fraternité clashes with oppressive regimes, economic disparity, misogyny, colonialism, xenophobia, homophobia, and racism. A guiding question in this course will be how works of literature centered on questions of social justice lend themselves so well to the screen and stage, and we will end with a look at the prevalence of social justice themes in contemporary film. We will also consider the ways in which American and French ideals of fraternity harmonize or clash with each other. A sampling of authors and film directors include Voltaire, George Sand, Victor Hugo, Emile Zola, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Aimé Césaire, Louis Malle, and Agnès Varda. This course will be taught in English, and we will use English translations of French texts. Those taking the course for credit towards the French major or minor will be expected to do the readings and written assignments in French. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 LFA
DET 211
20 18 
ENG-310-01
Southern Gothic Literature
Benedicks C
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-310-01=BLS-300-01=GEN-300-01. This class is about the ghosts that haunt the literature of the American South. After the Civil War, when the ideal of the pastoral plantation crumbled, Southern writers sought to contend with the brutal historic realities that had always lurked behind the white-pillared façade: poverty, violence, slavery, racism, patriarchy. Southern Gothic literature-which emerged in the early 19th century and continues strong today-is marked by dark humor, transgressive desires, grotesque violence, folk spiritualism, hereditary sins, emotional and environmental isolation, supernatural forces, and punishing madness. In this class, we will listen to the stories that the ghosts of the American South have told, and still tell today. We'll read the work of authors such as William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Carson McCullers, Tennessee Williams, Richard Wright, Dorothy Allison, Zora Neal Hurston, Toni Morrison, Kristen Arnett, Karen Russell, Gillian Flynn, and Jesmyn Ward. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00
CEN 216
15
ENG-310-01
Southern Gothic Literature
Benedicks C
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-310-01=BLS-300-01=GEN-300-01. This class is about the ghosts that haunt the literature of the American South. After the Civil War, when the ideal of the pastoral plantation crumbled, Southern writers sought to contend with the brutal historic realities that had always lurked behind the white-pillared façade: poverty, violence, slavery, racism, patriarchy. Southern Gothic literature-which emerged in the early 19th century and continues strong today-is marked by dark humor, transgressive desires, grotesque violence, folk spiritualism, hereditary sins, emotional and environmental isolation, supernatural forces, and punishing madness. In this class, we will listen to the stories that the ghosts of the American South have told, and still tell today. We'll read the work of authors such as William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Carson McCullers, Tennessee Williams, Richard Wright, Dorothy Allison, Zora Neal Hurston, Toni Morrison, Kristen Arnett, Karen Russell, Gillian Flynn, and Jesmyn Ward. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 LFA, LIT
CEN 216
15
ENG-310-01
Southern Gothic Literature
Benedicks C
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-310-01=BLS-300-01=GEN-300-01. This class is about the ghosts that haunt the literature of the American South. After the Civil War, when the ideal of the pastoral plantation crumbled, Southern writers sought to contend with the brutal historic realities that had always lurked behind the white-pillared façade: poverty, violence, slavery, racism, patriarchy. Southern Gothic literature-which emerged in the early 19th century and continues strong today-is marked by dark humor, transgressive desires, grotesque violence, folk spiritualism, hereditary sins, emotional and environmental isolation, supernatural forces, and punishing madness. In this class, we will listen to the stories that the ghosts of the American South have told, and still tell today. We'll read the work of authors such as William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Carson McCullers, Tennessee Williams, Richard Wright, Dorothy Allison, Zora Neal Hurston, Toni Morrison, Kristen Arnett, Karen Russell, Gillian Flynn, and Jesmyn Ward. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00
CEN 216
15
ENG-310-01
Southern Gothic Literature
Benedicks C
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-310-01=BLS-300-01=GEN-300-01. This class is about the ghosts that haunt the literature of the American South. After the Civil War, when the ideal of the pastoral plantation crumbled, Southern writers sought to contend with the brutal historic realities that had always lurked behind the white-pillared façade: poverty, violence, slavery, racism, patriarchy. Southern Gothic literature-which emerged in the early 19th century and continues strong today-is marked by dark humor, transgressive desires, grotesque violence, folk spiritualism, hereditary sins, emotional and environmental isolation, supernatural forces, and punishing madness. In this class, we will listen to the stories that the ghosts of the American South have told, and still tell today. We'll read the work of authors such as William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Carson McCullers, Tennessee Williams, Richard Wright, Dorothy Allison, Zora Neal Hurston, Toni Morrison, Kristen Arnett, Karen Russell, Gillian Flynn, and Jesmyn Ward. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00
CEN 216
15
ENG-310-02
The Revolutionary Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-310-02=THE-212-02
1.00
FIN M120
15 13 
ENG-310-02
The Revolutionary Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-310-02=THE-212-02
1.00 LFA, LIT
FIN M120
15 13 
ENG-310-02
The Revolutionary Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-310-02=THE-212-02
1.00
FIN M120
15 13 
ENG-310-02
The Revolutionary Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. ENG-310-02=THE-212-02
1.00
FIN M120
15 13 
FRC - FRESHMAN COLLOQUIUM
FRC-101-01
Enduring Questions
Baer J
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
ATH CLASS
16
FRC-101-02
Enduring Questions
Monsalve M
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
TRIP 123
16
FRC-101-03
Enduring Questions
Jay J
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
CEN 216
16
FRC-101-04
Enduring Questions
Gower J
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
BAX 214
15
FRC-101-05
Enduring Questions
Ross G
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
HAY 002
14
FRC-101-06
Enduring Questions
Horton R
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
FIN CONC
16
FRC-101-07
Enduring Questions
Gates Z
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
HAY 003
16
FRC-101-08
Enduring Questions
Dunaway E
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
FIN EXP
16
FRC-101-09
Enduring Questions
Pouille A
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
DET 109
16
FRC-101-10
Enduring Questions
Tompkins N
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
GOO 104
16
FRC-101-11
Enduring Questions
Sorensen-Kamakian E
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
HAY 319
16
FRC-101-12
Enduring Questions
Olofson E
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
BAX 212
16
FRC-101-13
Enduring Questions
Warner R
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
MXI 109
16
FRC-101-14
Enduring Questions
Kunze S
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
BAX 114
16
FRC-101-15
Enduring Questions
Vogel H
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
FIN M120
16
FRC-101-17
Enduring Questions
Whitney J
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
DET 111
16
FRC-101-18
Enduring Questions
Ables M
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
DET 212
16
FRC-101-19D
Enduring Questions
Benedicks C
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00
TBA TBA
16
FRE - FRENCH
FRE-277-01
Social Justice Modern France
Quandt K
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. FRE-277-01=ENG-270-01 Inspired by the American Revolution and the founding of an independent American republic, French revolutionaries built their model of a new state upon the principals of freedom (la liberté), equality (l'égalité), and fraternity (la fraternité). But, as in the United States, these enshrined ideals have been far from the realities of common experience. Through political treatises, essays, works of literature, and film, this course will trace the paradoxes and contradictions that emerge as the ideal of fraternité clashes with oppressive regimes, economic disparity, misogyny, colonialism, xenophobia, homophobia, and racism. A guiding question in this course will be how works of literature centered on questions of social justice lend themselves so well to the screen and stage, and we will end with a look at the prevalence of social justice themes in contemporary film. We will also consider the ways in which American and French ideals of fraternity harmonize or clash with each other. A sampling of authors and film directors include Voltaire, George Sand, Victor Hugo, Emile Zola, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Aimé Césaire, Louis Malle, and Agnès Varda. This course will be taught in English, and we will use English translations of French texts. Those taking the course for credit towards the French major or minor will be expected to do the readings and written assignments in French. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 LFA
DET 211
20 16 
GEN - GENDER STUDIES
GEN-103-01
Bodies Onstage: Gender & Cultr
Vogel H
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. THE-206-02=GEN-103-01 This course will explore historical and contemporary American theater expressions of gender and cultural identity. We will use performances, scripts, and scholarly writings to analyze the representation of gender in Indigenous, Hispanic, Black, white, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation and production of these works. We will also examine the tension between entertainment and socio-political engagement for performers, playwrights, and audiences. Sample theorists and playwrights: bell hooks, Jill Dolan, Milcha Sanchez-Scott, Tarell Alvin McCraney, Young Jean Lee, Nilo Cruz, and Qui Nguyen. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 LFA
FIN S206
15
GEN-200-01
Children of War
Thomas S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. HIS-340-02=PSC240-01=GEN-200-01 This course examines the role of children in international affairs through the many dynamics of war and conflict during the twentieth century. It will consider how the demographics of war-torn societies, and the gendered nature of war have disproportionately victimized women and children. Specifically, students will discuss how war produces children through rape, lust, and love, the effects of war on children and the participation of children in war. The course will also consider the responsibilities of the international community broadly, and the United States specifically, to protect and support children of war including those fathered by American soldiers. In addition, students will learn about various types of child exploitation and child saving that make both mothers and their children vulnerable during conflict including international adoption, child-sponsorship, and immigration and refugee policies. Students will examine a number of case studies regarding child soldiers, children born of war, transnational adoption, and child migrants.
1.00 HPR
BAX 311
15 13 
GEN-210-01
100 Years of Woman Suffrage
Gelbman S
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. PSC-210-01=GEN-210-01=HIS-240 100 Years of Woman Suffrage: Women as Voters, Candidates, and Elected Officials in US Politics The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which forbids states from denying citizens the right to vote on account of sex, was ratified just over a century ago in 1920. This course examines women's role in American election politics in the hundred years since: Are there distinctive patterns or trends in women's voting behavior? Do women run for office for different reasons than men, and do they campaign differently? Once elected, how do women perform as representatives? How do gender and other demographic characteristics (e.g. race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, etc.) interact to shape women's experience as voters, candidates, and representatives in American politics? What has changed since 1920 and what hasn't? We'll look at the work political scientists and other researchers have done so far to answer these questions, consider individual women's experiences as American voters, candidates, and elected officials, and weigh in on ongoing debates about whether and how to enhance women's participation in electoral politics in the United States and beyond. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 HPR
BAX 114
15 12 
GEN-277-01
Heroes & Heroines Amer Musical
Badue A
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. THE-103-03=MUS-104-01=GEN-277-01 In this course we will embark on a journey to explore the concept of heroism in musical culture. Focusing exclusively on the American musical theater repertoire, we will meet individuals who changed the way music has been composed, performed, and perceived. We will focus on the heroic archetype and gender studies to examine characters from selected musicals who broke through artistic and gender boundaries. The course also considers musical theater performers and songwriters who have used their public prominence to promote social change and defy limits of gender. Examples include songs, characters, performers, and creators of shows from the 1950s to the present, including recent hits like Hamilton (2015) and Six (2017).
1.00 BS
FIN M120
16 12 
GHL - GLOBAL HEALTH
GHL-201-01
Sociology & Politics of Health
Gelbman S
M F
02:15PM - 03:30PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Enrollment by Instructor consent. GHL-201=PSC-201=SOC-201.
1.00 BS, GHL
FIN BALL
30 26 
GHL-310-01
Bioethics
Hughes C
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. PHI-319-02=PPE-329-02=GHL-310-01 Controversies in bioethics have become a regular part of contemporary life. We are in the midst of a biological and technological revolution that raises interesting and important ethical and philosophical questions: When does life begin? How do we define death? What life is worth living, who decides, and how? When is experimentation on humans justified? Should we allow a free market in human organs, tissues, genes? Should we use new technologies for human enhancement? What does it mean to suffer from disease and disability? What is a good relationship between a patient and caregivers? How can we provide a just distribution of health-care resources? We will consider these and other questions in a seminar discussion format. Recommended Prerequisites: (i) some background in biology (e.g. BIO 101) AND (ii) one prior course in philosophy or completion of Enduring Questions.
1.00 BS, GHL
CEN 216
16 11 
GHL-310-03
Medicine - Aristotle to Aids
Rhoades M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.HIS-300-01=GHL-310-03 Students in this seminar will explore readings in medical history from the ancient Greeks to modern Europeans. The course begins by examining classical Greek interpretations of the body and illness. Ancient ideas about the body, adopted during the European middle ages and renaissance, will continue to inform western medical practices through treatments such as cupping and bloodletting. Turning to the 18th and 19th centuries, students will study the development of formal and informal medical structures as they appeared in western Europe. Readings cover quackery, first laboratories, hospitals, military medicine, and medical educations. Final topics in the course will include discoveries in hygiene, changes in surgical practices, and the cultural and social impact of disease. This year we will conclude the course with a discussion of public health, emerging pathogens, and virus hunters. This course is suitable for those interested in social or cultural history, students wishing to pursue a medical degree, or anyone seeking a better understanding of modern medicine in the age of pandemic. Assignments will include several short papers and a research paper on a topic in medical history. Prerequisite: at least 0.5 credit in HIS
1.00 BS, GHL
BAX 214
15 15 
HIS - HISTORY
HIS-102-02
World Hist Since 1500
Royalty B, Morillo S
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 HPR
BAX 202
19
HIS-102-03
World Hist Since 1500
Rhoades M
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 HPR
DET 209
20
HIS-200-01
A Moral History of Warfare
Kunze S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
How, when, where, and to what end can killing be considered legitimate? Using the Second World War as our primary case study, this course will examine the moral choices that states and individuals make in wars. We will concentrate on the pre- and post-facto rhetoric and reality - intentions, decisions, execution, and legitimation - of violence against civilians among major combatants. We will consider historical efforts to protect civilians and examine why laws of war and international agreements have protected civilians in the first place. We will explore how and whether we can differentiate between licit and illicit forms of violence against civilians. We will ask whether we can distinguish Soviet, American, British, German, and Japanese use of force, and what difference genocide and the Holocaust make in completing our analysis.
1.00 HPR
HAY 003
14
HIS-200-02
Legal Borderlands
Kunze S
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
The periphery of the United States is not only made up of physical borderlands but also of legal interstitial zones, places that test the reach of American sovereignty. This discussion-based course will look at places where American law bumps up against other defining markers, the contact-zones that challenge the prevalent legal paradigms. We will examine how these areas define what constitutes an American; how the government makes specific identities within its jurisdiction visible and invisible. Topics we will cover include: statelessness and denaturalization, American extraterritorial courts in China, gender and sexuality under the law, the American Guano Islands, outlawing "coolies," the insular cases and citizen-subjects, and Guantanamo Bay, not to mention the making and unmaking of physical borderlands around the United States. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 HPR
HAY 003
15
HIS-230-01
Beatles: Cultural History
Royalty B
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
1ST HALF SEMESTER. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. HIS-230-01=MUS-204-02 The four lads from Liverpool were arguably the most significant cultural event of the mid-20th c, from popular music to fashion,politics, and religion. This course will study the Beatles in their social, political and cultural context, from post-war Britain of the 1940s, through the economic and social recovery of the 50s, and the swinging and turbulent sixties. We will use a range of methods including social and cultural history as well as musicology.
0.50 HPR
BAX 114
15
HIS-230-02
German Cultural History
van der Kolk J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. HIS-230-02=GER-312-01. Culture and civilization of the German people from first attestations to the Nazi period. Conducted in English. Students examine representative periods and thinkers in German history. Beginning with the first encounters of Germanic tribes with the Roman Empire, the course proceeds to successive changes brought on by migration, Christianization, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, Nationalism, the Industrial Revolution, and political unification, with a special eye on the persistent issue of German national identity. Students who take the course under the German listing will be expected to read primary literature in German and write their assessments in German. Students who attend through the History listing will read and write in English.
1.00 HPR
DET 212
19 16 
HIS-232-01
20th Century Europe
Rhoades M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 HPR
GOO 104
20
HIS-240-02
100 Years of Woman Suffrage
Gelbman S
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. HIS-240-02=PSC-210=GEN-210. The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which forbids states from denying citizens the right to vote on account of sex, was ratified just over a century ago in 1920. This course examines women's role in American election politics in the hundred years since: Are there distinctive patterns or trends in women's voting behavior? Do women run for office for different reasons than men, and do they campaign differently? Once elected, how do women perform as representatives? How do gender and other demographic characteristics (e.g. race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, etc.) interact to shape women's experience as voters, candidates, and representatives in American politics? What has changed since 1920 and what hasn't? We'll look at the work political scientists and other researchers have done so far to answer these questions, consider individual women's experiences as American voters, candidates, and elected officials, and weigh in on ongoing debates about whether and how to enhance women's participation in electoral politics in the United States and beyond. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 HPR
BAX 114
15 14 
HIS-240-02
100 Years of Woman Suffrage
Gelbman S
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. HIS-240-02=PSC-210=GEN-210. The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which forbids states from denying citizens the right to vote on account of sex, was ratified just over a century ago in 1920. This course examines women's role in American election politics in the hundred years since: Are there distinctive patterns or trends in women's voting behavior? Do women run for office for different reasons than men, and do they campaign differently? Once elected, how do women perform as representatives? How do gender and other demographic characteristics (e.g. race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, etc.) interact to shape women's experience as voters, candidates, and representatives in American politics? What has changed since 1920 and what hasn't? We'll look at the work political scientists and other researchers have done so far to answer these questions, consider individual women's experiences as American voters, candidates, and elected officials, and weigh in on ongoing debates about whether and how to enhance women's participation in electoral politics in the United States and beyond. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00
BAX 114
15 14 
HIS-240-02
100 Years of Woman Suffrage
Gelbman S
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. HIS-240-02=PSC-210=GEN-210. The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which forbids states from denying citizens the right to vote on account of sex, was ratified just over a century ago in 1920. This course examines women's role in American election politics in the hundred years since: Are there distinctive patterns or trends in women's voting behavior? Do women run for office for different reasons than men, and do they campaign differently? Once elected, how do women perform as representatives? How do gender and other demographic characteristics (e.g. race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, etc.) interact to shape women's experience as voters, candidates, and representatives in American politics? What has changed since 1920 and what hasn't? We'll look at the work political scientists and other researchers have done so far to answer these questions, consider individual women's experiences as American voters, candidates, and elected officials, and weigh in on ongoing debates about whether and how to enhance women's participation in electoral politics in the United States and beyond. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00
BAX 114
15 14 
HIS-243-01
US Since 1945
Thomas S
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 HPR
MXI 109
20
HIS-260-01
Central Asia to 1700
Morillo S
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. HIS-260-01=ASI-260-01 This course examines the history of an important but underappreciated region of the world, the Central Asian steppes (grasslands). We will look at the origins of the horse-riding pastoralists who lived there and periodically threatened the sedentary civilizations around the steppes, consider the role of the region as a highway connecting the major sedentary areas commercially (aka "The Silk Road"), and trace the dynamics and chronology of the major steppe political powers that emerged there, including the Scythians whom Herodotus wrote about, the Hsiung Nu of Chinese fame, and the Huns and Turks who took their turns being terrifying to various folk. We will look closely at the climax of all this, the sudden emergence of the Mongols as world conquerors. We will close around 1700, when the steppes ceased to maintain an independent political existence.
1.00 HPR
BAX 202
19
HIS-340-01
Reconstruction
Thomas S, Himsel S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.SOPHOMORES, JUNIORS AND SENIORS ONLY. HIS-340-01=PSC-310-01=PPE-338-01=BLS-300-03 Americans sought to right the wrongs that caused our bloody Civil War through constitutional amendments abolishing slavery, guaranteeing equal protection of the law, and protecting the right to vote during Reconstruction. Why did these amendments completely fail to achieve their purposes for nearly a century until the Civil Rights Movement of the late 1950s and the 1960s? And to what extent do the failures of Reconstruction continue to plague us today? Can we trace them to today's Black Lives Matter movement or last summer's protests over the death of George Floyd? We will begin our search for answers by trying to recover what freedom, equality, and the right to vote meant both to those who advocated the Reconstruction Amendments and those who strenuously opposed them. We will also examine the "politics of history"-how in the decades after Reconstruction, some tailored the history of that era and the Civil War to support their political agenda in favor of a segregated society. Finally, we will ask whether that distorted history of Reconstruction still affects us today. Is it still "baked" into our legal and political system? These are all critical questions because we still rely upon the Reconstruction Amendments to resolve most of our major civil rights questions, including voting rights, immigrant rights, affirmative action, and LGBTQ rights. We will examine a number of these recent civil rights decisions in light of the understanding we gain about Reconstruction. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 HPR
BAX 114
15
HIS-340-01
Reconstruction
Thomas S, Himsel S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.SOPHOMORES, JUNIORS AND SENIORS ONLY. HIS-340-01=PSC-310-01=PPE-338-01=BLS-300-03 Americans sought to right the wrongs that caused our bloody Civil War through constitutional amendments abolishing slavery, guaranteeing equal protection of the law, and protecting the right to vote during Reconstruction. Why did these amendments completely fail to achieve their purposes for nearly a century until the Civil Rights Movement of the late 1950s and the 1960s? And to what extent do the failures of Reconstruction continue to plague us today? Can we trace them to today's Black Lives Matter movement or last summer's protests over the death of George Floyd? We will begin our search for answers by trying to recover what freedom, equality, and the right to vote meant both to those who advocated the Reconstruction Amendments and those who strenuously opposed them. We will also examine the "politics of history"-how in the decades after Reconstruction, some tailored the history of that era and the Civil War to support their political agenda in favor of a segregated society. Finally, we will ask whether that distorted history of Reconstruction still affects us today. Is it still "baked" into our legal and political system? These are all critical questions because we still rely upon the Reconstruction Amendments to resolve most of our major civil rights questions, including voting rights, immigrant rights, affirmative action, and LGBTQ rights. We will examine a number of these recent civil rights decisions in light of the understanding we gain about Reconstruction. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00
BAX 114
15
HIS-340-01
Reconstruction
Thomas S, Himsel S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.SOPHOMORES, JUNIORS AND SENIORS ONLY. HIS-340-01=PSC-310-01=PPE-338-01=BLS-300-03 Americans sought to right the wrongs that caused our bloody Civil War through constitutional amendments abolishing slavery, guaranteeing equal protection of the law, and protecting the right to vote during Reconstruction. Why did these amendments completely fail to achieve their purposes for nearly a century until the Civil Rights Movement of the late 1950s and the 1960s? And to what extent do the failures of Reconstruction continue to plague us today? Can we trace them to today's Black Lives Matter movement or last summer's protests over the death of George Floyd? We will begin our search for answers by trying to recover what freedom, equality, and the right to vote meant both to those who advocated the Reconstruction Amendments and those who strenuously opposed them. We will also examine the "politics of history"-how in the decades after Reconstruction, some tailored the history of that era and the Civil War to support their political agenda in favor of a segregated society. Finally, we will ask whether that distorted history of Reconstruction still affects us today. Is it still "baked" into our legal and political system? These are all critical questions because we still rely upon the Reconstruction Amendments to resolve most of our major civil rights questions, including voting rights, immigrant rights, affirmative action, and LGBTQ rights. We will examine a number of these recent civil rights decisions in light of the understanding we gain about Reconstruction. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00
BAX 114
15
HIS-340-01
Reconstruction
Thomas S, Himsel S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.SOPHOMORES, JUNIORS AND SENIORS ONLY. HIS-340-01=PSC-310-01=PPE-338-01=BLS-300-03 Americans sought to right the wrongs that caused our bloody Civil War through constitutional amendments abolishing slavery, guaranteeing equal protection of the law, and protecting the right to vote during Reconstruction. Why did these amendments completely fail to achieve their purposes for nearly a century until the Civil Rights Movement of the late 1950s and the 1960s? And to what extent do the failures of Reconstruction continue to plague us today? Can we trace them to today's Black Lives Matter movement or last summer's protests over the death of George Floyd? We will begin our search for answers by trying to recover what freedom, equality, and the right to vote meant both to those who advocated the Reconstruction Amendments and those who strenuously opposed them. We will also examine the "politics of history"-how in the decades after Reconstruction, some tailored the history of that era and the Civil War to support their political agenda in favor of a segregated society. Finally, we will ask whether that distorted history of Reconstruction still affects us today. Is it still "baked" into our legal and political system? These are all critical questions because we still rely upon the Reconstruction Amendments to resolve most of our major civil rights questions, including voting rights, immigrant rights, affirmative action, and LGBTQ rights. We will examine a number of these recent civil rights decisions in light of the understanding we gain about Reconstruction. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00
BAX 114
15
HSP - HISPANIC STUDIES
HSP-270-01D
Latin American Music
Badue A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. HSP-270-01D=MUS-204-01D. This course surveys folk/vernacular, popular, and classical music from Latin American countries. Through the academic lens of Ethnomusicology, we will study the uses and functions of music in various Latin American societies, explore their musical practices, instruments, and performance traditions, and contextualize them with history, politics, and entertainment. As the course introduces different forms of music and how they have been combined (for example, how vernacular music is adapted into commercial popular music; and folk music becomes the basis of orchestral pieces), lectures, readings, and assignments will interrogate what defines both a Latin American musical identity and that of specific countries, specially vis-à-vis European and Anglo-American cultures.
1.00 LFA
TBA TBA
20 18 
HUM - HUMANITIES
HUM-122-01
Modern Linguistics
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. 1ST HALF SEMESTER. HUM-122-01=MLL-122-01-ENG-122-01.
0.50 LS
GOO 104
26 23 
HUM-176-01
Intr to Liberal Arts At Wabash
Pittard M, Horton R
W
07:30PM - 08:45PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. FULL SEMESTER; 1/2 CREDIT. This course will engage students with the ideas and people that can help them succeed at Wabash and will build upon similar experiences in the fall semester. Students will meet with Career Services staff to identify, apply for, and secure an internship for the summer, will talk with alumni about their Wabash stories of success, and will continue to develop an understanding of the hidden curriculum of higher education, including, but limited to, the expectations and strategies for interacting with college faculty and staff. In addition, students will practice foundational intellectual skills of careful reading, collaborative conversation, and effective writing via texts that reinforce and expand upon their readings for Enduring Questions. Grading in the course will be based upon preparation and engagement, weekly reflections, and class discussions. The course will meet one day per week, will count as a half-credit towards graduation. This half-credit will not count towards majors, minors, or distribution/proficiency requirements.
0.50
HAY 104
30
HUM-295-01D
Representations of Holocaust
Phillips G
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. REL-295-01D=ART-210-03D=HUM-295-01D. This course explores a variety of representations of the Holocaust in theology, literature, film, and art. This interdisciplinary course examines the creative and material work of historians, theologians, novelists, poets, graphic novelists, painters, film makers, composers, photographers, and museum architects. The course explores the limits and possibilities of representing atrocity by raising such questions as: Can suffering be represented? What do representations of the Jewish genocide convey to 21st century citizens and subsequent generations of Jews and Christians? Is it barbaric to write poetry and fiction, paint or compose music, film documentaries and TV comedies, draw cartoons and graphic novels, publish photographs or erect monuments about such horrific events? How does visual media facilitate the raising of profound moral and religious questions about the Holocaust and our responses to it? Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 HPR, LFA
TBA TBA
18 16 
HUM-296-01D
Parables Jewish/Christian Trad
Phillips G
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. REL-196-01D=HUM-296-01D.This course examines the parable as a distinctive literary form employed by Jews and Christians to communicate profound religious truths. Parables are subversive stories, word images that challenge conventional theological and moral perceptions. By design, the parable's enigmatic and riddling character presses readers to the limits of reason, belief, and action. The course investigates how parables work, who employs them, how readers defend against them, and why religious traditions worth their salt both need and resist them. Among the ancient and modern Jewish and Christian parablers to be studied are Jesus and the Gospel writers, the Rabbis and Hasidim, Kierkegaard and Kafka, Wiesel and Buber, Cohen and Crossan. We will look at parables that take visual expression in the artwork of post-Holocaust painter Samuel Bak and in the film "Fight Club. The course engages the study of literature, Jewish and Christian theology, art, and religious responses to the modern world.
1.00 HPR, LFA
TBA TBA
18 15 
MAT - MATHEMATICS
MAT-106-02
Voting and Electoral Systems
Turner W
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. PSC-220-01=MAT-106-02 Voting and elections are the cornerstone of every democracy. They are how we the people tell the government what we want. Yet, complaints about the electoral process are as old as democracy itself. Even today -especially today- issues like Gerrymandering and the Electoral College have us questioning whether or no ordinary citizens really are qualified to make political decisions. "The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything." -Joseph Stalin In this course, we will exam the variety of ways that voters decide and votes are counted. Are some electoral systems better than others? Are some fairer than others? Are those even the same thing? One unique feature of this course is that we will examine these issues from political and mathematical perspectives. Can math help us measure the proportionality, fairness, efficiency or effectiveness of a political system? Can it help us find solutions for the democratic dilemma? This course is cross-listed as MAT 106 and PSC 220. As such, it can be used to satisfy the Quantitative Skills, Quantitative Literacy, or Behavioral Science distribution credits.
1.00 SM, QL, QS
LIB GOODRICH
30
MAT-111-01
Calculus I
McKinney C
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 SM, QL, QS
GOO 101
11
MAT-111-01D
Calculus I
McKinney C
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00 SM, QL, QS
TBA TBA
1
MAT-277-01
Fractal Geometry/Chaotic Dynam
Poffald E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. An introduction to fractal geometry and chaotic dynamics on fractals. Topics include iterated function systems, contraction mappings, similarity and Hausdorff dimension of fractals, and an introduction to Julia sets and the Mandelbrot set.
1.00 QL
GOO 305
14 11 
MLL - MODERN LANGUAGES
MLL-122-01
Modern Linguistics
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. 1ST HALF SEMESTER. MLL-122-01=ENG-122-01=HUM-122-01.
0.50 LS
GOO 104
26 19 
MSL - MILITARY SCIENCE & LEADERSHIP
MSL-001-01
Leadership Lab (ROTC)
Staff
TH
03:30PM - 05:20PM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
MSL-102-01
Found of Agile & Adaptive Lead
Staff
TH
01:30PM - 02:20PM
This class is held at Purdue University and is only for Wabash students in Purdue's ROTC program. THe start date is 1/21/21 and end date is 5/1/21.
0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS - MUSIC
MUS-101-01
Music in Society
Makubuya J
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 LFA
FIN BALL
40
MUS-104-01
Heroes & Heroines Amer Musical
Badue A
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. THE-103-03=MUS-104-01=GEN-277-01 In this course we will embark on a journey to explore the concept of heroism in musical culture. Focusing exclusively on the American musical theater repertoire, we will meet individuals who changed the way music has been composed, performed, and perceived. We will focus on the heroic archetype and gender studies to examine characters from selected musicals who broke through artistic and gender boundaries. The course also considers musical theater performers and songwriters who have used their public prominence to promote social change and defy limits of gender. Examples include songs, characters, performers, and creators of shows from the 1950s to the present, including recent hits like Hamilton (2015) and Six (2017).
1.00 LFA
FIN M120
16
MUS-153-01
Glee Club
Williams S
M TU W TH
04:15PM - 06:00PM
FACE TO FACE.
0.50 LFA
TBA TBA
60 35 
MUS-202-01
Instruments & Culture
Makubuya J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 LFA
FIN M120
 
MUS-204-01D
Latin American Music
Badue A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. MUS-204-01D=HSP-270-01D This course surveys folk/vernacular, popular, and classical music from Latin American countries. Through the academic lens of Ethnomusicology, we will study the uses and functions of music in various Latin American societies, explore their musical practices, instruments, and performance traditions, and contextualize them with history, politics, and entertainment. As the course introduces different forms of music and how they have been combined (for example, how vernacular music is adapted into commercial popular music; and folk music becomes the basis of orchestral pieces), lectures, readings, and assignments will interrogate what defines both a Latin American musical identity and that of specific countries, specially vis-à-vis European and Anglo-American cultures.
1.00 LFA
TBA TBA
20 16 
MUS-204-02
Beatles: Cultural History
Royalty B
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
1st Half Semester. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. HIS-230-01=MUS-204-02 The four lads from Liverpool were arguably the most significant cultural event of the mid-20th c, from popular music to fashion,politics, and religion. This course will study the Beatles in their social, political and cultural context, from post-war Britain of the 1940s, through the economic and social recovery of the 50s, and the swinging and turbulent sixties. We will use a range of methods including social and cultural history as well as musicology.
0.50 LFA
BAX 114
14
MUS-206-01
European Music Since 1750
Ables M
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE
1.00 LFA
FIN S206
16
MUS-224-01
Global Persp Music Cul & Id
Badue A
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. In this course we will study pieces of music, composers, performers, and musical practices that reflect and shape national identities. Special attention will be given to musical traits and styles that define specific nationalities. Language and lyrics definitely help to shape national identity, but this course focuses on musical characteristics and compositional techniques that have been employed and recognized as representative of certain nations. Topics will include folk songs (from European and American traditions), orchestral pieces (from the Baroque French overture to Copland's Lincoln Portrait), national anthems (as studied by ethnomusicologists), and popular songs composed in the wake of and response to national disasters and political turmoil.
1.00 LFA
FIN M140
16 13 
NSC - NEUROSCIENCE
NSC-204-01
Principles of Neuroscience
Robison C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. NSC-204=PSY-204
1.00
BAX 202
20 19 
PHI - PHILOSOPHY
PHI-144-01
Introduction to Existentialism
Hughes C
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 HPR
CEN 216
18
PHI-217-01
Philosophy of Race
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. BLS-280-01=PHI-217-01=PPE-217-01
1.00 HPR, DR
CEN 216
18
PHI-270-01D
Elem Symbolic Logic
Carlson M
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. Available to virtual learners.
1.00 HPR, QL, QS
TBA TBA
35 14 
PHY - PHYSICS
PHY-220L-01
Electronics Lab
Brown J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. CoReq PHY-220
0.00
GOO 307
8
PPE - PHILOSOPHY POLITICS ECONOMICS
PPE-217-01
Philosophy of Race
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. BLS-280-01=PHI-217-01=PPE-217-01
1.00 HPR, DR
CEN 216
18 15 
PPE-218-01F
Philosophy of Commerce
Gower J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Face to Face course. Not available to virtual learners. PHI-218-01=PHI-118-01F=PPE-218-01=PPE-218-01F
1.00 HPR
FIN CONC
7
PPE-228-01
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HYBRID COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. BLS-280-02=EDU-201-01=PPE-228-01
1.00 HPR
HAY 002
14 14 
PPE-329-01
Neoliberalism
Gower J
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. PHI-319-01=PPE-329-01=PSC-330-01. In many contemporary academic discourses, including discourses in philosophy, political theory, and economics, "neoliberalism" names a new kind of economic thinking that emerged in the middle of the twentieth century, influenced economic policy changes beginning in the 1970s and 80s, and led to significant transformations in the global political and economic order that continue to shape our lives in profound ways. The term is widely used, but its meaning is still in dispute. This course will investigate the meaning of neoliberalism by studying some of its most well-known proponents such as Hayek, Friedman, and Becker and by looking at it through various critical lenses. We will focus on how neoliberal thinking, policy, and practice transforms human beings into entrepreneurs of themselves, both individually and collectively.
1.00 HPR
CEN 215
15
PPE-338-01
Reconstruction
Thomas S, Himsel S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. SOPHOMORES, JUNIORS AND SENIORS ONLY. HIS-340-01=PSC-310-01=PPE-338-01=BLS-300-03 Reconstruction: The Politics of History. Americans sought to right the wrongs that caused our bloody Civil War through constitutional amendments abolishing slavery, guaranteeing equal protection of the law, and protecting the right to vote during Reconstruction. Why did these amendments completely fail to achieve their purposes for nearly a century until the Civil Rights Movement of the late 1950s and the 1960s? And to what extent do the failures of Reconstruction continue to plague us today? Can we trace them to today's Black Lives Matter movement or last summer's protests over the death of George Floyd? We will begin our search for answers by trying to recover what freedom, equality, and the right to vote meant both to those who advocated the Reconstruction Amendments and those who strenuously opposed them. We will also examine the "politics of history"-how in the decades after Reconstruction, some tailored the history of that era and the Civil War to support their political agenda in favor of a segregated society. Finally, we will ask whether that distorted history of Reconstruction still affects us today. Is it still "baked" into our legal and political system? These are all critical questions because we still rely upon the Reconstruction Amendments to resolve most of our major civil rights questions, including voting rights, immigrant rights, affirmative action, and LGBTQ rights. We will examine a number of these recent civil rights decisions in light of the understanding we gain about Reconstruction. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 BS
BAX 114
15 12 
PSC - POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSC-121-02
Intro to Comparative Politics
C. Taber
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Not available to Virtual Learners.
1.00 BS
BAX 101
25 19 
PSC-131-01
Intro to Political Theory
McCrary L
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HYBRID COURSE. Not available to Virtual Learners.
1.00 BS
LIB GOODRICH
35
PSC-141-01
Intro to Intn'l Relations
Wells M
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Available to Virtual Learners.
1.00 BS
LIB GOODRICH
33
PSC-201-01
Sociology & Politics of Health
Gelbman S
M F
02:15PM - 03:30PM
HYBRID COURSE. Not available to virtual learners. Enrollment by Instructor permission. PSC-201=SOC-201=GHL-201.
1.00 BS
FIN BALL
30 29 
PSC-210-01
100 Years of Woman Suffrage
Gelbman S
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEANERS. PSC-210=HIS-240-02=GEN-210. The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which forbids states from denying citizens the right to vote on account of sex, was ratified just over a century ago in 1920. This course examines women's role in American election politics in the hundred years since: Are there distinctive patterns or trends in women's voting behavior? Do women run for office for different reasons than men, and do they campaign differently? Once elected, how do women perform as representatives? How do gender and other demographic characteristics (e.g. race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, etc.) interact to shape women's experience as voters, candidates, and representatives in American politics? What has changed since 1920 and what hasn't? We'll look at the work political scientists and other researchers have done so far to answer these questions, consider individual women's experiences as American voters, candidates, and elected officials, and weigh in on ongoing debates about whether and how to enhance women's participation in electoral politics in the United States and beyond. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 BS
BAX 114
15
PSC-220-01
Voting and Electoral Systems
Turner W
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. PSC-220-01=MAT-106-02 Voting and elections are the cornerstone of every democracy. They are how we the people tell the government what we want. Yet, complaints about the electoral process are as old as democracy itself. Even today -especially today- issues like Gerrymandering and the Electoral College have us questioning whether or no ordinary citizens really are qualified to make political decisions. "The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything." -Joseph Stalin In this course, we will exam the variety of ways that voters decide and votes are counted. Are some electoral systems better than others? Are some fairer than others? Are those even the same thing? One unique feature of this course is that we will examine these issues from political and mathematical perspectives. Can math help us measure the proportionality, fairness, efficiency or effectiveness of a political system? Can it help us find solutions for the democratic dilemma? This course is cross-listed as MAT-106 and PSC-220. As such, it can be used to satisfy the Quantitative Skills, Quantitative Literacy, or Behavioral Science distribution credits.
1.00 BS
LIB GOODRICH
30 21 
PSC-220-02
African Politics
C. Taber
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Why are some countries in Africa more economically developed than others? Why are some democratic (or democratizing), while others still struggle with authoritarianism? Why do we, in the "Global North," usually only hear about Africa and African politics during times of crisis? And what role have states in the Global North historically played in both exacerbating and responding to these issues? We will address these questions and many more as we explore the politics, history, economies, and societies that make up the mosaic of Sub-Saharan Africa, as well as the increasingly large role the region and its nations play on the global stage.
1.00 BS
BAX 114
15 10 
PSC-240-01
Children of War
Thomas S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. HIS-340-02=PSC240-01=GEN-200-01 This course examines the role of children in international affairs through the many dynamics of war and conflict during the twentieth century. It will consider how the demographics of war-torn societies, and the gendered nature of war have disproportionately victimized women and children. Specifically, students will discuss how war produces children through rape, lust, and love, the effects of war on children and the participation of children in war. The course will also consider the responsibilities of the international community broadly, and the United States specifically, to protect and support children of war including those fathered by American soldiers. In addition, students will learn about various types of child exploitation and child saving that make both mothers and their children vulnerable during conflict including international adoption, child-sponsorship, and immigration and refugee policies. Students will examine a number of case studies regarding child soldiers, children born of war, transnational adoption, and child migrants. Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors.
1.00 BS
BAX 311
15
PSC-242-01
Amer Foreign Policy
Wells M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 BS
BAX 202
18
PSC-310-01
Reconstruction
Thomas S, Himsel S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. SOPHOMORES, JUNIORS AND SENIORS ONLY. HIS-340-01=PSC-310-01=PPE-338-01=BLS-300-03 Americans sought to right the wrongs that caused our bloody Civil War through constitutional amendments abolishing slavery, guaranteeing equal protection of the law, and protecting the right to vote during Reconstruction. Why did these amendments completely fail to achieve their purposes for nearly a century until the Civil Rights Movement of the late 1950s and the 1960s? And to what extent do the failures of Reconstruction continue to plague us today? Can we trace them to today's Black Lives Matter movement or last summer's protests over the death of George Floyd? We will begin our search for answers by trying to recover what freedom, equality, and the right to vote meant both to those who advocated the Reconstruction Amendments and those who strenuously opposed them. We will also examine the "politics of history"-how in the decades after Reconstruction, some tailored the history of that era and the Civil War to support their political agenda in favor of a segregated society. Finally, we will ask whether that distorted history of Reconstruction still affects us today. Is it still "baked" into our legal and political system? These are all critical questions because we still rely upon the Reconstruction Amendments to resolve most of our major civil rights questions, including voting rights, immigrant rights, affirmative action, and LGBTQ rights. We will examine a number of these recent civil rights decisions in light of the understanding we gain about Reconstruction. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 BS
BAX 114
15 12 
PSC-330-01
Neoliberalism
Gower J
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Not available for Virtual Learners. PHI-319-01=PPE-329-01=PSC-330-01. In many contemporary academic discourses, including discourses in philosophy, political theory, and economics, "neoliberalism" names a new kind of economic thinking that emerged in the middle of the twentieth century, influenced economic policy changes beginning in the 1970s and 80s, and led to significant transformations in the global political and economic order that continue to shape our lives in profound ways. The term is widely used, but its meaning is still in dispute. This course will investigate the meaning of neoliberalism by studying some of its most well-known proponents such as Hayek, Friedman, and Becker and by looking at it through various critical lenses. We will focus on how neoliberal thinking, policy, and practice transforms human beings into entrepreneurs of themselves, both individually and collectively.
1.00 BS
CEN 215
15 15 
PSC-330-01
Neoliberalism
Gower J
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. Not available for Virtual Learners. PHI-319-01=PPE-329-01=PSC-330-01. In many contemporary academic discourses, including discourses in philosophy, political theory, and economics, "neoliberalism" names a new kind of economic thinking that emerged in the middle of the twentieth century, influenced economic policy changes beginning in the 1970s and 80s, and led to significant transformations in the global political and economic order that continue to shape our lives in profound ways. The term is widely used, but its meaning is still in dispute. This course will investigate the meaning of neoliberalism by studying some of its most well-known proponents such as Hayek, Friedman, and Becker and by looking at it through various critical lenses. We will focus on how neoliberal thinking, policy, and practice transforms human beings into entrepreneurs of themselves, both individually and collectively.
1.00 BS
CEN 215
15 15 
PSY - PSYCHOLOGY
PSY-101-03
Introduction to Psychology
Olofson E
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 BS
BAX 101
25
PSY-110-01
Psychology of Racial Justice
Schmitzer-Torbert N, Bost P, Horton R, (more)
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. The Psychology of Racial Justice. This course will examine psychological approaches to understanding some of the causes of racial inequity and consider approaches to better achieve racial justice. We will discuss research from social, cognitive, and developmental psychology as well as from neuroscience to understand how stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination arise within individuals. We will also focus on the bidirectional relationship between individuals and social institutions. The course will explore the impact of social institutions on racial justice by considering a range of policing and judicial outcomes, how individuals are in turn affected by their experiences with these institutions, and how we can better achieve racial justice through both individual and institutional change. Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
0.50 BS
FIN S206
25 12 
PSY-204-01
Principles of Neuroscience
Robison C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. PSY-204=NSC-204.
1.00
BAX 202
20
REL - RELIGION
REL-151-01D
Introduction to Judaism
Phillips G
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. What is Judaism? What defines Jewishness? This course surveys major facets of Judaism as a religion, culture, and historical phenomenon from antiquity to the present. Focus will be on foundational texts (the Hebrew Bible, the Talmud, and the Zohar), major historical developments (rabbinic, medieval, and modern expressions), and core theological beliefs and practices (Torah, ethics, and holiday cycle). Film, literature, and art will be featured in exploring the course's central questions.
1.00 HPR
TBA TBA
25
REL-162-01
History & Lit of New Testament
Jay J
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. REL-162=CLA-162
1.00 HPR, LFA
CHA CHAPEL
50 31 
REL-172-01
Reformation to Modern Era
Baer J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 HPR
CHA CHAPEL
50 25 
REL-273-03
Thomas Aquinas: Philos & Theol
Nelson D
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. 1ST HALF SEMESTER. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) is the most important medieval theologian and philosopher. His work integrated classical Christian beliefs with the newest philosophy and science available at the time: Aristotle's recently re-discovered thought. This seminar will read excerpts from Thomas' Summa Theologica related to the nature and existence of God, evil, human action, sacraments and grace. Course offered first half of the semester.
0.50 HPR
CEN 215
12
REL-273-04
Women Mystics of Middle Ages
Nelson D
M W F
09:05AM - 09:55AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. 2nd HALF SEMESTER. Women were excluded from positions of formal leadership within the medieval church, but many sought alternative ways of articulating a theological commitment and teaching others what they knew. This course looks at key figures in one such "alternative" Christianity, the mystics of the Middle Ages. Authors include Julian of Norwich, Mechthild of Magdeburg, Brigit of Sweden, Hildegard of Bingen, Hadewijch of Antwerp and Catherine of Siena. These remarkable women wrote about God, medicine, war, love and lust, the lurking evils of ordinary life, and much more.
0.50 HPR
CEN 215
12
REL-295-01D
Representations of Holocaust
Phillips G
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
VIRTUAL COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. REL-295-01D=ART-210-03D=HUM-295-01D. This course explores a variety of representations of the Holocaust in theology, literature, film, and art. This interdisciplinary course examines the creative and material work of historians, theologians, novelists, poets, graphic novelists, painters, film makers, composers, photographers, and museum architects. The course explores the limits and possibilities of representing atrocity by raising such questions as: Can suffering be represented? What do representations of the Jewish genocide convey to 21st century citizens and subsequent generations of Jews and Christians? Is it barbaric to write poetry and fiction, paint or compose music, film documentaries and TV comedies, draw cartoons and graphic novels, publish photographs or erect monuments about such horrific events? How does visual media facilitate the raising of profound moral and religious questions about the Holocaust and our responses to it? Meets the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major.
1.00 HPR
TBA TBA
18 10 
REL-296-01D
Parables Jewish/Christian Trad
Phillips G
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
VIRTUAL COURSE. AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. REL-296-01D=HUM-296-01D.This course examines the parable as a distinctive literary form employed by Jews and Christians to communicate profound religious truths. Parables are subversive stories, word images that challenge conventional theological and moral perceptions. By design, the parable's enigmatic and riddling character presses readers to the limits of reason, belief, and action. The course investigates how parables work, who employs them, how readers defend against them, and why religious traditions worth their salt both need and resist them. Among the ancient and modern Jewish and Christian parablers to be studied are Jesus and the Gospel writers, the Rabbis and Hasidim, Kierkegaard and Kafka, Wiesel and Buber, Cohen and Crossan. We will look at parables that take visual expression in the artwork of post-Holocaust painter Samuel Bak and in the film "Fight Club. The course engages the study of literature, Jewish and Christian theology, art, and religious responses to the modern world.
1.00 HPR, LFA
TBA TBA
18
RHE - RHETORIC
RHE-101-02
Public Speaking
Abbott J
M W F
02:15PM - 03:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS.
1.00 LS
HAY 319
20
RHE-270-01
Strategic Communication
Drury J
M W F
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. This course introduces students to strategic communication, with an emphasis on the rhetorical dimensions of message design. Strategic communication is an umbrella term and subfield that considers how organizations use communication to achieve their missions, often engaging facets related to information campaigns, public relations, and marketing. This class will be organized into three modules, each addressing a different context of strategic communication: marketing and advertising, health campaigns, and crisis communication. Within each module, students will learn theories and models of best practices, audience analysis and research, and communication ethics. As a Lit/Fine Arts distribution course, students will primarily use case studies and a research project to analyze rather than create strategic communication messages.
1.00 LFA
HAY 104
25
SOC - SOCIOLOGY
SOC-201-01
Sociology & Politics of Health
Gelbman S
M F
02:15PM - 03:30PM
HYBRID COURSE. Not available to virtual learners. Enrollment by Instructor permission. PSC-201=SOC-201=GHL-201.
1.00 BS
FIN BALL
30
SOC-298-01
Sociology of Religion
Jay J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. SOC-298=REL-298.
1.00 BS, HPR
DET 209
20 17 
SPA - SPANISH
SPA-103-01
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Rogers D
M W F
10:10AM - 11:00AM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Requires SPA-103 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-103L
1.00 FL
DET 211
12
SPA-103L-01
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Co-Requisite: SPA-103
0.00
DET 112
6
SPA-103L-02
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
M
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Co-Requisite: SPA-103
0.00
DET 112
6
SPA-103L-03
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
TU
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Co-Requisite: SPA-103
0.00
DET 212
6
SPA-201L-01
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:30PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Co-Requisite: SPA-201
0.00
DET 111
6
SPA-201L-06
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Co-Requisite: SPA-201
0.00
DET 111
6
SPA-202L-01
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:20PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Co-Requisite: SPA-202
0.00
DET 212
6
SPA-202L-02
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Co-Requisite: SPA-202
0.00
DET 111
6
SPA-202L-03
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
W
03:20PM - 04:10PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Co-Requisite: SPA-202
0.00
DET 109
6
SPA-202L-04
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Co-Requisite: SPA-202
0.00
DET 212
6
SPA-202L-05
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:20PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Co-Requisite: SPA-202
0.00
DET 212
6
SPA-202L-06
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. Co-Requisite: SPA-202
0.00
DET 112
6
THE - THEATER
THE-103-01
Movement for the Stage
Johansen R
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE FOR VIRTUAL LEARNERS. In this course, we will develop, explore, and improve the physical body and mental attentiveness of the performer. We will immerse ourselves in the study of several disciplines and physical practices, including yoga, t'ai chi, stage combat, and slapstick comedy. We will also explore the Suzuki and Viewpoints methods of acting and movement, both of which have become foundational cornerstones to contemporary actor training. No prior experience necessary! Come build strength and flexibility in your body, while discovering new ways to find focus and awareness in your mind.
1.00 LFA
FIN BALL
12
THE-103-01
Movement for the Stage
Johansen R
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE FOR VIRTUAL LEARNERS. In this course, we will develop, explore, and improve the physical body and mental attentiveness of the performer. We will immerse ourselves in the study of several disciplines and physical practices, including yoga, t'ai chi, stage combat, and slapstick comedy. We will also explore the Suzuki and Viewpoints methods of acting and movement, both of which have become foundational cornerstones to contemporary actor training. No prior experience necessary! Come build strength and flexibility in your body, while discovering new ways to find focus and awareness in your mind.
1.00
FIN BALL
12
THE-103-01
Movement for the Stage
Johansen R
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE FOR VIRTUAL LEARNERS. In this course, we will develop, explore, and improve the physical body and mental attentiveness of the performer. We will immerse ourselves in the study of several disciplines and physical practices, including yoga, t'ai chi, stage combat, and slapstick comedy. We will also explore the Suzuki and Viewpoints methods of acting and movement, both of which have become foundational cornerstones to contemporary actor training. No prior experience necessary! Come build strength and flexibility in your body, while discovering new ways to find focus and awareness in your mind.
1.00
FIN BALL
12
THE-103-01
Movement for the Stage
Johansen R
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE FOR VIRTUAL LEARNERS. In this course, we will develop, explore, and improve the physical body and mental attentiveness of the performer. We will immerse ourselves in the study of several disciplines and physical practices, including yoga, t'ai chi, stage combat, and slapstick comedy. We will also explore the Suzuki and Viewpoints methods of acting and movement, both of which have become foundational cornerstones to contemporary actor training. No prior experience necessary! Come build strength and flexibility in your body, while discovering new ways to find focus and awareness in your mind.
1.00
FIN BALL
12
THE-103-03
Heroes & Heroines Amer Musical
Badue A
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. THE-103-03=MUS-104-01=GEN-277-01 In this course we will embark on a journey to explore the concept of heroism in musical culture. Focusing exclusively on the American musical theater repertoire, we will meet individuals who changed the way music has been composed, performed, and perceived. We will focus on the heroic archetype and gender studies to examine characters from selected musicals who broke through artistic and gender boundaries. The course also considers musical theater performers and songwriters who have used their public prominence to promote social change and defy limits of gender. Examples include songs, characters, performers, and creators of shows from the 1950s to the present, including recent hits like Hamilton (2015) and Six (2017).
1.00 LFA
FIN M120
16 16 
THE-103-03
Heroes & Heroines Amer Musical
Badue A
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. THE-103-03=MUS-104-01=GEN-277-01 In this course we will embark on a journey to explore the concept of heroism in musical culture. Focusing exclusively on the American musical theater repertoire, we will meet individuals who changed the way music has been composed, performed, and perceived. We will focus on the heroic archetype and gender studies to examine characters from selected musicals who broke through artistic and gender boundaries. The course also considers musical theater performers and songwriters who have used their public prominence to promote social change and defy limits of gender. Examples include songs, characters, performers, and creators of shows from the 1950s to the present, including recent hits like Hamilton (2015) and Six (2017).
1.00
FIN M120
16 16 
THE-103-03
Heroes & Heroines Amer Musical
Badue A
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. THE-103-03=MUS-104-01=GEN-277-01 In this course we will embark on a journey to explore the concept of heroism in musical culture. Focusing exclusively on the American musical theater repertoire, we will meet individuals who changed the way music has been composed, performed, and perceived. We will focus on the heroic archetype and gender studies to examine characters from selected musicals who broke through artistic and gender boundaries. The course also considers musical theater performers and songwriters who have used their public prominence to promote social change and defy limits of gender. Examples include songs, characters, performers, and creators of shows from the 1950s to the present, including recent hits like Hamilton (2015) and Six (2017).
1.00
FIN M120
16 16 
THE-103-03
Heroes & Heroines Amer Musical
Badue A
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FACE TO FACE COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. THE-103-03=MUS-104-01=GEN-277-01 In this course we will embark on a journey to explore the concept of heroism in musical culture. Focusing exclusively on the American musical theater repertoire, we will meet individuals who changed the way music has been composed, performed, and perceived. We will focus on the heroic archetype and gender studies to examine characters from selected musicals who broke through artistic and gender boundaries. The course also considers musical theater performers and songwriters who have used their public prominence to promote social change and defy limits of gender. Examples include songs, characters, performers, and creators of shows from the 1950s to the present, including recent hits like Hamilton (2015) and Six (2017).
1.00
FIN M120
16 16 
THE-203-01
Costume Design
Bear A
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. THE-203-01=THE-203-01SR
1.00 LFA
FIN S206
8
THE-203-01SR
Costume Design
Bear A
M W F
11:15AM - 12:05PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. THE-203-01SR IS FOR SENIORS ONLY. THE-203-01=THE-203-01SR
1.00 LFA
FIN S206
4
THE-212-01
The Revolutionary Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. THE-212-01=ENG-310-02.
1.00 LIT
FIN M120
15
THE-212-01
The Revolutionary Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HYBRID COURSE. NOT AVAILABLE TO VIRTUAL LEARNERS. THE-212-01=ENG-310-02.
1.00
FIN M120
15