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21/FA Course Faculty Days Comments/Requisites Credits Location Capacity Available Seats
BLS - BLACK STUDIES
BLS-270-04
Politics of Civil Rights Mvmt
Gelbman S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PSC-214-01=HIS-240-01=BLS-270-04. Instructor permission required.
1.00
BAX 201
9
BLS-270-07
Civil Rights the Black Arts
Vogel H
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
THE-103-01=BLS-270-07=HIS-240-02. Instructor permission required. The 1950s and 60s saw the emergence of two sociopolitical movements: the mostly rural-based Civil Rights Movement, and the mostly urban-centered Black Arts Movement. In this course, we will examine Black theatrical contributions to the movements: witnessing the sanctioning of violence on Black citizens and the representation of Black life and community. In 1955, the funeral of Emmett Till ignited wide-spread activism and James Baldwin's THE AMEN CORNER premiered at Howard University. In 1959, Lorraine Hansberry's A RAISIN IN THE SUN was the first play written, directed, and performed by Black theater artists on Broadway; and paralleled the news coverage of the Greensboro, South Carolina lunch counter sit-ins, as well as simultaneous sit-ins across the South. In the 1960s, Black-run theatres such as the New Lafayette in Harlem, the Negro Ensemble Company, and the Free Southern Theater produced playwrights Amiri Baraka, Ed Bullins, Ron Milner, Sonia Sanchez, Adrienne Kennedy, Alice Childress, Douglas Turner Ward and Joseph A. Walker, who were writing in a new Black idiom. In these plays of the Black Arts Movement, the protests and violence of the era are confronted on the stage, both in dialogue and action, melding the spheres of public and dramatic performance
1.00
FIN M120
9
DV1 - DIVISION I
DV1-277-01
Chemistry of Wine
Schmitt P
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
F
02:10PM - 03:50PM
This course will explore the chemistry and technology of modern wine making. Primary literature and a wine chemistry text (Understanding Wine Chemistry, Waterhouse et al.) will form the core material for the course, with representative wine parings chosen to accompany each topic. The course will combine elements of organic chemistry, biochemistry, and analytical chemistry together with a basic study of geography, history, culture, and tasting protocols necessary in any form of wine education. In more detail, the course will explore i) how the chemical components of grapes and wine (sugars, alcohol, phenols, esters, among many others) are influenced by terroir, climate, fermentation, etc. ii) the structure/ properties of these compounds and how they are measured and quantified, and iii) how these compounds impact the taste, aroma, mouthfeel, longevity, and value of wine. Each example wine would be tasted in the context of identifying these specific chemical characteristics, also (briefly) discussing the geographic and cultural origins of each particular example.
1.00
HAY 321
HAY 321
12
HIS - HISTORY
HIS-210-01
Jesus and Jewish War With Rome
Royalty B
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HIS-210-01=REL-250-01 Instructor permission only The course is a social and political history of Roman Judea and Galilee in the context of the life and death of Jesus of Nazareth and the Jewish Revolt against Rome. Both events offer windows into understanding the Roman world in the first century CE and the formation of Judaism from the diversity of the Second Temple Period. The course will include a strong emphasis on archaeology and the material culture of the sites, which have given scholars new insights into Jesus and the war in the past 40 years. This course includes an immersion trip to Israel during Thanksgiving Recess, 20-28 November 2021. We will visit the Galilee, Jerusalem, Jericho, Bethlehem, Qumran, and Masada.
1.00
BAX 114
14
HIS-240-01
Politics of Civil Rights Mvmt
Gelbman S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PSC-214-01=HIS-240-01=BLS-270-04. Instructor permission required.
1.00
BAX 201
9
HIS-240-02
Civil Rights & the Black Arts
Vogel H
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
THE-103-01=BLS-270-07=HIS-240-02. Instructor permission required. The 1950s and 60s saw the emergence of two sociopolitical movements: the mostly rural-based Civil Rights Movement, and the mostly urban-centered Black Arts Movement. In this course, we will examine Black theatrical contributions to the movements: witnessing the sanctioning of violence on Black citizens and the representation of Black life and community. In 1955, the funeral of Emmett Till ignited wide-spread activism and James Baldwin's THE AMEN CORNER premiered at Howard University. In 1959, Lorraine Hansberry's A RAISIN IN THE SUN was the first play written, directed, and performed by Black theater artists on Broadway; and paralleled the news coverage of the Greensboro, South Carolina lunch counter sit-ins, as well as simultaneous sit-ins across the South. In the 1960s, Black-run theatres such as the New Lafayette in Harlem, the Negro Ensemble Company, and the Free Southern Theater produced playwrights Amiri Baraka, Ed Bullins, Ron Milner, Sonia Sanchez, Adrienne Kennedy, Alice Childress, Douglas Turner Ward and Joseph A. Walker, who were writing in a new Black idiom. In these plays of the Black Arts Movement, the protests and violence of the era are confronted on the stage, both in dialogue and action, melding the spheres of public and dramatic performance
1.00
FIN M120
9
PSC - POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSC-214-01
Politics of Civil Rights Mvmt
Gelbman S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PSC-214-01=HIS-240-01=BLS-270-04. Instructor permission required.
1.00
BAX 201
9 -1 
REL - RELIGION
REL-250-01
Jesus & Jewish Revolt Against
Royalty B
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HIS-210-01=REL-250-01 Instructor permission only The course is a social and political history of Roman Judea and Galilee in the context of the life and death of Jesus of Nazareth and the Jewish Revolt against Rome. Both events offer windows into understanding the Roman world in the first century CE and the formation of Judaism from the diversity of the Second Temple Period. The course will include a strong emphasis on archaeology and the material culture of the sites, which have given scholars new insights into Jesus and the war in the past 40 years. This course includes an immersion trip to Israel during Thanksgiving Recess, 20-28 November 2021. We will visit the Galilee, Jerusalem, Jericho, Bethlehem, Qumran, and Masada.
1.00
BAX 114
14
THE - THEATER
THE-103-01
Civil Rights the Black Arts
Vogel H
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
THE-103-01=BLS-270-07=HIS-240-02. Instructor permission required. The 1950s and 60s saw the emergence of two sociopolitical movements: the mostly rural-based Civil Rights Movement, and the mostly urban-centered Black Arts Movement. In this course, we will examine Black theatrical contributions to the movements: witnessing the sanctioning of violence on Black citizens and the representation of Black life and community. In 1955, the funeral of Emmett Till ignited wide-spread activism and James Baldwin's THE AMEN CORNER premiered at Howard University. In 1959, Lorraine Hansberry's A RAISIN IN THE SUN was the first play written, directed, and performed by Black theater artists on Broadway; and paralleled the news coverage of the Greensboro, South Carolina lunch counter sit-ins, as well as simultaneous sit-ins across the South. In the 1960s, Black-run theatres such as the New Lafayette in Harlem, the Negro Ensemble Company, and the Free Southern Theater produced playwrights Amiri Baraka, Ed Bullins, Ron Milner, Sonia Sanchez, Adrienne Kennedy, Alice Childress, Douglas Turner Ward and Joseph A. Walker, who were writing in a new Black idiom. In these plays of the Black Arts Movement, the protests and violence of the era are confronted on the stage, both in dialogue and action, melding the spheres of public and dramatic performance
1.00
FIN M120
9