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20/SP Course Faculty Days Comments/Requisites Credits Location Capacity Available Seats
ASI - ASIAN STUDIES
ASI-112-01
Beijing: Past, Present, Future
Healey C
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Cross List: ASI-112 = HIS-260 Beijing, China's capital, is one of the world's most populous cities and a remarkable hybrid of old and new. This interdisciplinary course traces the history and culture of Beijing from the thirteenth century to the present, investigating how historical events, politics, and urban planning have shaped the city's character and the lives of its everyday people. We will analyze how Beijing has been portrayed in literature, film, and other media. We will also consider how larger trends like urbanization and global capitalism are shaping Beijing in new ways. This course includes a 2-week immersion trip to Beijing in May. Enrollment by instructor permission only. No prerequisites. 1.00
DET 112
16
BIO - BIOLOGY
BIO-177-01
Global Health
Wetzel E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Enrollment through Registrar's Office with Permission from Instructor. The multidisciplinary issues of global health confront everyone on the planet. This course will introduce critical issues and key themes in global health from basic principles to disease burden to collaborative efforts to improve global health. Particular attention will be given to the connection between parasitic-infectious disease and poverty, social determinants of health, and the global burden of disease. Cultural, economic and ethical issues in global health will be discussed. An immersion component following this class is planned for travel to Peru, July 31 -- August 13, 2020 (dates subject to change), and will likely involve travel to urban, mountain, and rainforest areas. Students should expect to make a financial contribution toward the trip. Grades for this course will be recorded as "incompletes" until after the summer immersion trip. Enrollment in the course is limited, competitive, and by application through the instructor; contact Prof. Eric Wetzel (wetzele@wabash.edu) if interested. This course counts toward the Global Health minor; however, it does NOT count toward the major in Biology. Prerequisites: BIO 101 or 111, or the consent of the instructor. Preference may be given to students who have some background in either Spanish, economics, political science, or global health. 1.00
HAY 003
14 12 
BIO-313-01
Advanced Ecology
Carlson B
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Enrollment through Registrar Office With Permission from Instructor. This course will apply ecology to specific environmental issues and study the practice of ecological research. This course emphasizes general research skills such as critically evaluating literature, designing and executing studies, biostatistics, and programming in R, and therefore this course will be especially valuable for students interested in performing research in any area of biology. Special attention will be given to a case study of the globally significant Everglades ecosystem of Florida, including its function and relationship to humans, culminating in a Spring Break immersion trip to a biological research station and the Everglades National Park in Florida, where students will apply their knowledge of ecology and research practices. Due to the immersion trip component, interested students must contact the instructor to apply to this course. BIO-213, BIO-313L 1.00
HAY 002
15
CLA - CLASSICS
CLA-212-01
Ancient Christianity in Rome
Nelson D
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Cross List CLA-212=REL-260. Enrollment through Registrar Office With Permission from Instructor. This course is dedicated to the study of Early Christianity as it was manifested in one particular place, the deeply-charged and long-standing imperial capital of Rome. This cross-listed and team-taught immersion course addresses one central question with multiple off-shoots: How did Christianity take shape in Rome? How did it emerge from, rebel against, and engage with that city's deep past? Before Constantine, what was the experience of early Christians? After Constantine, how did the shape and character of the city (not to mention its inhabitants) change? What did early adherents of Christianity believe, and how were those beliefs negotiated, enhanced, challenged, and made orthodox through visual and material culture, especially religious architecture and its decoration? What was the experience of practitioners of traditional Greco-Roman religion after Christianity became the default religion of the Empire? In other words, our investigation will be about social history, architecture, religious history and theology, and art/iconography. It is about the realia of what people believed, saw, experienced, and did. And the best way to get a sense of those features of ancient life and belief is to visit the key places themselves: the city of Rome and, as a complement to the features of the urban experience that Rome lacks, its port city of Ostia. 1.00
CEN 216
16 14 
EDU - EDUCATION
EDU-330-01
Studies in Urban Education
Pittard M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Using Memphis, TN as the context, students in this course will study a variety of issues related to urban education. The course culminates in a week-long immersion trip to Memphis (May 10-15), where students will work with host teachers in Memphis public schools. Additionally, students will have opportunities to job-shadow in organizations related to urban development, education policy, and youth services. Enrollment through Registrar's Office With permission from instructor. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. Take 2 Credits in Education, including EDU-101 0.50
DET 220
12
GER - GERMAN
GER-202-01
German Language & Culture
Tucker B
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Enrollment through Registrar Office With Permission from Instructor GER-201 or GER-202 placement., CoReq GER-202L 1.00
DET 212
16
GHL - GLOBAL HEALTH
GHL-177-01
Special Topics
Wetzel E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Cross List: GHL-177=BIO-177 Enrollment through Registrar's Office with Permission from Instructor. The multidisciplinary issues of global health confront everyone on the planet. This course will introduce critical issues and key themes in global health from basic principles to disease burden to collaborative efforts to improve global health. Particular attention will be given to the connection between parasitic-infectious disease and poverty, social determinants of health, and the global burden of disease. Cultural, economic and ethical issues in global health will be discussed. An immersion component following this class is planned for travel to Peru, July 31 -- August 13, 2020 (dates subject to change), and will likely involve travel to urban, mountain, and rainforest areas. Students should expect to make a financial contribution toward the trip. Grades for this course will be recorded as "incompletes" until after the summer immersion trip. Enrollment in the course is limited, competitive, and by application through the instructor; contact Prof. Eric Wetzel (wetzele@wabash.edu) if interested. This course counts toward the Global Health minor; however, it does NOT count toward the major in Biology. Prerequisites: BIO 101 or 111, or the consent of the instructor. Preference may be given to students who have some background in either Spanish, economics, political science, or global health. 1.00
HAY 003
14
HIS - HISTORY
HIS-260-01
Beijing: Past, Present, Future
Healey C
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Cross List HIS-260=ASI-112 Beijing, China's capital, is one of the world's most populous cities and a remarkable hybrid of old and new. This interdisciplinary course traces the history and culture of Beijing from the thirteenth century to the present, investigating how historical events, politics, and urban planning have shaped the city's character and the lives of its everyday people. We will analyze how Beijing has been portrayed in literature, film, and other media. We will also consider how larger trends like urbanization and global capitalism are shaping Beijing in new ways. This course includes a 2-week immersion trip to Beijing in May. Enrollment by instructor permission only. No prerequisites. 1.00
DET 112
16 10 
PSC - POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSC-340-01
Politics of Northern Ireland
Wells M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Over 3,500 people were killed during the "Troubles" of Northern Ireland (1968-1998), a conflict in the heart of Europe that was defined by terrorist bombings, paramilitary gunfights, and military occupation. It pitted Republican Catholics, who wanted the six counties of Northern Ireland to rejoin the Republic of Ireland, against Unionist Protestants, who believed those counties should remain part of the United Kingdom. This course aims to serve as a deep-dive case study of what was to become one of the most enduring political conflicts of the 20th Century. It will cover the background and history of the conflict, including its roots in the emigration of Protestants from England in the 17th century and the period of the "Troubles" itself. It will also examine events and issues that have arisen since the 1998 Good Friday Agreement which formally ended hostilities, including concerns over Brexit's potential impact on lasting stability. We will explore these issues through the lenses of history and political science, and we will do so both in the classroom and in an immersion experience over Spring Break. The immersion experience will provide students with the opportunity to see where much of this history has taken place (Dublin, Belfast, Londonderry/Derry) and most importantly, to engage in conversations with individuals who lived through the Troubles, from everyday citizens to active participants in the violence. Prerequisites: PSC-121 or PSC-141. Immersion Course, enrollment by instructor permission. PreReq PSC-141 1.00
BAX 212
12
REL - RELIGION
REL-260-01
Ancient Christianity in Rome
Nelson D
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Cross List REL-260=CLA-212. Enrollment through Registrar Office With Permission from Instructor. This course is dedicated to the study of Early Christianity as it was manifested in one particular place, the deeply-charged and long-standing imperial capital of Rome. This cross-listed and team-taught immersion course addresses one central question with multiple off-shoots: How did Christianity take shape in Rome? How did it emerge from, rebel against, and engage with that city's deep past? Before Constantine, what was the experience of early Christians? After Constantine, how did the shape and character of the city (not to mention its inhabitants) change? What did early adherents of Christianity believe, and how were those beliefs negotiated, enhanced, challenged, and made orthodox through visual and material culture, especially religious architecture and its decoration? What was the experience of practitioners of traditional Greco-Roman religion after Christianity became the default religion of the Empire? In other words, our investigation will be about social history, architecture, religious history and theology, and art/iconography. It is about the realia of what people believed, saw, experienced, and did. And the best way to get a sense of those features of ancient life and belief is to visit the key places themselves: the city of Rome and, as a complement to the features of the urban experience that Rome lacks, its port city of Ostia. 1.00
CEN 216
16
THE - THEATER
THE-303-01
London: Modern City
Abbott M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
This course will consider London as the locus for what is and was Modern. We will spend one week in London attending and reviewing theater performances, visiting Museums (particularly Tate Modern and The Design Museum), visiting landmark Mod culture sites (e.g. the legendary Troubadour Club (est. 1954), Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club in Soho, the British Music Experience Museum, Twickenham Film Studios, Bar Italia's Scooter Club) tracking the rise and evolution of Mod culture in London. Prior to the trip, we will study plays, films, music, fashion, architecture, and television documenting the rise of Mod culture in 1960s London. We will track its evolution through 80s punk and beyond, studying London's trend-setting nature and its continual effort to define and redefine what is Modern. We will also see theater productions representing a wide range of theater companies, conceptual approaches, and modes of production. Enrollment through Registrar's Office with permission from instructor. 1.00
FIN TGRR
15