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20/SP Course Faculty Days Comments/Requisites Credits Location Capacity Available Seats
ART - ART
ART-104-01
Roman Art & Archaeol
M. Gorey
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Cross List: ART-104 = CLA-104 1.00
HAY 319
35 17 
ART-210-01
Literature and Photography
Mong D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Cross List: ART-210 = ENG-350 "What tales might those pictures tell," Walt Whitman once asked, "if their mute lips had the power of speech?" In English 350, we'll explore how writers and artists have answered that question since photography's invention in 1839-an event that changed the way we look at art. We'll read photographs and photobooks. We'll consider the many ways that photography and literature intersect: authors' photos, illustrations, captions, photo albums, and sequential art. Throughout it all, we'll ask how the talkative text responds to the silent image. We'll even think about the etymology for the word photograph: writing with light. Your readings will stretch from the 19th to 21st centuries, including poems, essays, stories, and criticism. Writers and photographers will include Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, James Agee, Walker Evans, Natasha Trethewey, Duane Michals, Emily Dickinson, Adrienne Rich, Robert Frank, and Diane Arbus. We'll ground ourselves with Susan Sontag's On Photography. We'll learn from Roland Barthes that all photographers are "agents of death" (Camera Lucida). Prerequisites: none. 1.00
CEN 300
20 13 
ART-210-02
Relig & Repres of Holocaust
Phillips G
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: REL-295 = HUM-295 = ART-210-02. This course examines different representations of the Holocaust in theology, literature, film, and art. Some of the questions and concerns the course raises includes: What are the limits to representing suffering and trauma? Is it legitimate to write poetry and fiction, paint and compose music, film documentaries and TV comedies, draw cartoons and graphic novels, publish photographs and erect monuments about such horrific events? How does visual media facilitate the raising of profound moral and religious questions about the Holocaust and the violence associated with it? What do representations of the atrocities of the Holocaust convey to later generations of Jews and Christians? Can Holocaust experiences be understood and interpreted in religious terms? This interdisciplinary course examines the creative and material work of historians, theologians, novelists, poets, graphic novelists, painters, film makers, composers, photographers, and museum architects as they grapple with these questions in response to the Holocaust. One credit. No prerequisites. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
CEN 305
20
ART-226-01
Cinematic Envmt: Digital Space
Mohl D
M W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
M W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Cinematic Environments: Digital Space is a Film & Digital Media production course that focuses on the creation of miniature models and digital compositing. Students will learn important aspects of set design, chroma-key compositing, keyframe animation, camera use, non-linear editing, lighting, sound, and character design. The course is structured so that students work on one advanced video project the entire semester, which mirrors the stages of a film production. No previous experience is required. Prerequisites: none 1.00
FIN A133
FIN A131
10
ASI - ASIAN STUDIES
ASI-112-01
Beijing: Past, Present, Future
Healey C
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Cross List: ASI-112 = HIS-260 Beijing, China's capital, is one of the world's most populous cities and a remarkable hybrid of old and new. This interdisciplinary course traces the history and culture of Beijing from the thirteenth century to the present, investigating how historical events, politics, and urban planning have shaped the city's character and the lives of its everyday people. We will analyze how Beijing has been portrayed in literature, film, and other media. We will also consider how larger trends like urbanization and global capitalism are shaping Beijing in new ways. This course includes a 2-week immersion trip to Beijing in May. Enrollment by instructor permission only. No prerequisites. 1.00
DET 112
16
ASI-204-01
Music in East Asian Cultures
Makubuya J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Cross List: ASI-204=MUS-204-02=HIS-260-02."Music in East Asian Cultures". This course, for all students regardless of their background, offers an introductory survey of East Asian musical instruments and their contextual significance in society. Beyond the instruments and their roles in producing musical sound, the course will examine significant ceremonies, rites, and rituals enhanced by music. In addition to being applicable to the distribution requirements, the course serves as a forum for learning about the historical connections that led to the interrelated adoptions and adaptations of musical styles and genres among the Chinese, Indian, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, and Taiwanese (music) cultures. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Credit 1. 1.00
FIN M120
20 19 
BIO - BIOLOGY
BIO-101-01
Human Biology
Bost A, W. Chen
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Co-Requisite: BIO-101L 1.00
HAY 104
48
BIO-177-01
Global Health
Wetzel E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Enrollment through Registrar's Office with Permission from Instructor. The multidisciplinary issues of global health confront everyone on the planet. This course will introduce critical issues and key themes in global health from basic principles to disease burden to collaborative efforts to improve global health. Particular attention will be given to the connection between parasitic-infectious disease and poverty, social determinants of health, and the global burden of disease. Cultural, economic and ethical issues in global health will be discussed. An immersion component following this class is planned for travel to Peru, July 31 -- August 13, 2020 (dates subject to change), and will likely involve travel to urban, mountain, and rainforest areas. Students should expect to make a financial contribution toward the trip. Grades for this course will be recorded as "incompletes" until after the summer immersion trip. Enrollment in the course is limited, competitive, and by application through the instructor; contact Prof. Eric Wetzel (wetzele@wabash.edu) if interested. This course counts toward the Global Health minor; however, it does NOT count toward the major in Biology. Prerequisites: BIO 101 or 111, or the consent of the instructor. Preference may be given to students who have some background in either Spanish, economics, political science, or global health. 1.00
HAY 003
14 12 
BLS - BLACK STUDIES
BLS-201-01
Introduction to Black Studies
Lake T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Cross List: ENG-260 = BLS-201. The course will introduce students to the history, methodology and major problems in black studies. This survey will explore the interdisciplinary nature of black studies scholarship and the challenges it presents to traditional academic models. The issue of the politicization of the academy and the relationship between black scholarship production and service to the black community will also be covered. The course will draw from a number of literary sources (Toni Morrison, Houston Barker, Henry Louis Gates), cultural theorist (bell hooks, Mark Anthony Neal, Cornel West) and historical works (Nell Painter, John H. Franklin, Alberto Raboteau.) This course will serve students interested in the study of the black experience. All majors are welcomed. Prerequisites: none. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
CEN 305
30 20 
BLS-270-01
Contemp US Public Address
Abbott J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: BLS-270-01 = RHE-270-01. Just what can a formal speech-in its traditional, oral form-do? How can we best judge a speech, determine its quality, or understand its rhetorical functions? And how have technologies, such as television, the internet, and social media, changed public address? This class will study major speeches written and delivered by U.S. rhetors during the 20th and 21st centuries. Speeches will range from award acceptance speeches and "late night" television monologues to legal arguments, protest rhetoric, and political discourse. We will study speeches from Eurocentric, Afrocentric, and feminist/queer theory approaches to learn about rhetorical artistry, the relationship between text and context, methods of analyzing public address, and the role of oratory in U.S. culture and democracy. Course sessions will emphasize primary texts but will utilize secondary literature to help understand the speeches and rhetorical analysis. Students will individually write three 6-8 page analysis papers and will work with a small group to produce and present an updated version of a 20th century speech for a 21st century audience. Prerequisites: none. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
FIN S206
25 25 
BLS-270-02
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
BLS-270=EDU-201=PPE-228=PHI-299 1.00
MXI 214
18 18 
BLS-270-03
Diversity & Multicultural Ed
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: BLS-270-03 = EDU-303-01 = SOC-303. This course introduces students to a sociological study of diversity in the U.S. system of public education, with particular attention to schools as sites of social conservation and reproduction. Readings, discussions, and written assignments explore the ways in which opportunity and (in)equality that exist in the wider society are reflected and perpetuated by typical approaches in U.S. schools. These explorations of challenges for schools are accompanied by an examination of multicultural and inclusive curricula and instructional practices. We consider the theoretical underpinnings of multicultural education as well as examples of curricula and practices designed to ameliorate education inequities. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
MXI 214
18 18 
BLS-280-01
Philosophy of Race
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: BLS-280 = PHI-217 = PPE-217. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
CEN 304
13 11 
BLS-280-02
Modernity in African Fiction
Pouille A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: BLS-280-02 = FRE-313-01 = ENG-300-01 This course will investigate how modernity is lived in contemporary Africa. Taking cues from works like Wole Soyinka's The Road, Mariama Bâ's Une si longue lettre (So Long a Letter), Ousmane Sembene's "Mandabi" and Cyprien's Ekwensi's Jagua Nana, we will examine what modernity becomes when it reaches Africa. We will acknowledge the particularity of each narrative selected for this course, and closely study how each depicts the local reception of key metaphors of modernity such as capitalism, the city, individualism, the nuclear family, secular education and the automobile. The goal of a close reading of the visual and written texts selected for this course is to acquire a deeper understanding of how communities found in Africa react to modernity, to unearth dimensions of modernity that we may be unaware of, and to find value in incorporating fictional accounts dealing with modern thought into broader conversations about modernity. Class is open to all students. Students taking it for a French credit will read, discuss, and write about the texts in French. 1.00
DET 128
15 15 
BLS-300-01
Slave Literature
Lake T
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Cross List: BLS-300 = ENG-360. The goal of the course is simple. We will N.K. Jemisin's The Broken Earth Trilogy! We will, also, view a few film/TV productions on slavery. Well, I guess we'll do a bit more than read and view these works, we will discuss them. Deeply. Students will probe and prod various modes of cultural productions in order to understand how slavery is being presented in our "post-slavery world." Is the representation of slavery in these works didactic, political, or moralistic? Moreover, are they "true"? If the truth of enslavement can be found in these works then what is the use of such truth for us today? In short, what are these books doing for (or to) the reader (us)? We will read and discuss materials populated with characters living in worlds where non-free and free persons struggle together and against forces and circumstances that they themselves didn't create but, rather, still are deeply committed to for good or ill. Because we are students of literature or, perhaps, despite this, we will deplore the tradecraft of literary criticism. Historical criticism, Deconstructionist, Marxist, Feminist, and Black literary theory are some of the tools used to tease out the meanings embedded within texts. We will use tools such as these in our readings and discussions. Prerequisites: one ENG course from Wabash. This cousrse will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
CEN 215
30 30 
CHE - CHEMISTRY
CHE-101-01
Survey of Chemistry
T. Cook, Wysocki L
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Co-Requisite: CHE-101L 1.00
HAY 319
60
CHE-101L-02
Survey Chemistry Lab
T. Cook
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-101 0.00
HAY 316
20
CHE-101L-03
Survey Chemistry Lab
Schmitt P
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: CHE-101 0.00
TBA TBA
20
CHE-241L-04
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Porter L
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Take CHE-241. 0.00
HAY 315
37 19 
CHE-241L-05
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Porter L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Take CHE-241. 0.00
HAY 315
 
CHE-241L-06
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Cook T
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Take CHE-241. 0.00
HAY 315
 
CHE-371-01
Special Topics: Makerlab
Porter L
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CHE-371-01: Special Topics in Chemistry (Makerlab: Computer-Aided Design, Desktop Prototyping, and Coding Fundamentals for Chemists) Digital modelling software, desktop fabrication devices, and integrated development boards are increasingly powerful tools for scientists and engineers. When combined, these pave the way for novel methods of molecular visualization, the creation of unique analytical instrumentation, and tooling of customized laboratory equipment. Rapid prototyping, based on parametric digital modelling, transcends the limitations of conventional tooling and commercially available components. Critical and creative thinking in the digital space opens the way for innovative design and problem solving. This class will focus on developing proficiency with these exciting new tools. Coursework will focus on introductory training to developing confidence in three main areas: (1) Parametric computer-aided design using the Autodesk Tinkercad and Fusion 360 software packages, (2) Fabrication of physical objects using 3D printers and high-power laser cutters, and (3) Coding for practical functionality within the Arduino integrated development environment. Students will demonstrate competency via several collaborative projects, including the design and production of specialized molecular models, functional analytical instrumentation, and novel laboratory equipment. Prerequisite: CHE-241 (or CHE-211) and instructor permission. Students selected by application. Instructor: L. Porter 1.00
TBA TBA
16 11 
CLA - CLASSICS
CLA-104-01
Roman Art & Archaeol
M. Gorey
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Cross List: CLA-104 = ART-104 1.00
HAY 319
35 17 
CLA-111-01
Greek Tragedy & Human Conditon
Kubiak D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Everyone knows that Oedipus killed his father and married his mother, but fewer people know who Sophocles is and that he wrote a famous play about these events. In this class we will trace the mysterious history of the tragic genre, which was a specifically Athenian invention flowering in the 5th century B.C., through reading selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Our goal will be to see how these authors used mythological characters and narratives to create literary works that summarize in a highly concentrated way the nature of the human condition and the dark entanglements that are an integral part of it. The first few classes will provide information about history and methods of approaching the texts, but the central purpose is for students to discuss the tragedies and bring their individual reactions to the issues they find there. There will be regular quizzes, two short papers, and a final examination. 1.00
DET 226
32 17 
CLA-162-01
New Testament
Phillips G
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Cross List: CLA-162=REL-162 1.00
CEN 216
50 27 
CLA-212-01
Ancient Christianity in Rome
Nelson D
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Cross List CLA-212=REL-260. Enrollment through Registrar Office With Permission from Instructor. This course is dedicated to the study of Early Christianity as it was manifested in one particular place, the deeply-charged and long-standing imperial capital of Rome. This cross-listed and team-taught immersion course addresses one central question with multiple off-shoots: How did Christianity take shape in Rome? How did it emerge from, rebel against, and engage with that city's deep past? Before Constantine, what was the experience of early Christians? After Constantine, how did the shape and character of the city (not to mention its inhabitants) change? What did early adherents of Christianity believe, and how were those beliefs negotiated, enhanced, challenged, and made orthodox through visual and material culture, especially religious architecture and its decoration? What was the experience of practitioners of traditional Greco-Roman religion after Christianity became the default religion of the Empire? In other words, our investigation will be about social history, architecture, religious history and theology, and art/iconography. It is about the realia of what people believed, saw, experienced, and did. And the best way to get a sense of those features of ancient life and belief is to visit the key places themselves: the city of Rome and, as a complement to the features of the urban experience that Rome lacks, its port city of Ostia. 1.00
CEN 216
16 14 
CLA-220-01
Ancient Rhetoric
Geraths C
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Cross List CLA-220=RHE-320 1.00
CEN 304
20 19 
CSC - COMPUTER SCIENCE
CSC-171-01
Special Topics in Comp. Sci.
Renk C
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
FIN M140
15 14 
DV3 - DIVISION III
DV3-252-01
Stats Soc Sciences
Howland F
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
This is offered in the first half semester. 0.50
BAX 312
15
ECO - ECONOMICS
ECO-101-01
Principles of Economics
Byun C, Snow N, E. Dunaway
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
BAX 114
28
ECO-101-02
Principles of Economics
Byun C, Saha S, Burnette J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
BAX 114
28
ECO-205-01
History of Economic Thought
Snow N
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Cross List: ECO-205=HIS-230=PPE-265 1.00
BAX 311
25
EDU - EDUCATION
EDU-372-01
Colonial & Postcolonial Ed
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
Cross List: EDU-372 = HIS-300. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
DET 220
12
ENG - ENGLISH
ENG-108-01
War Poetry
Benedicks C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
War poetry has been called "a language made of blood." It encompasses some of the most intensely-felt human experiences and emotions: grief, terror, boredom, love, guilt, loss. In this class, we will consider poetry written by soldiers, professional writers, civilians, and protesters. While our focus will be on WWI, Vietnam, and the ongoing wars in the Middle East, we will also read war poetry from the ancient world and from various other perspectives. We will work to explore the vast range of responses to warfare and to consider how poetry offers a unique space for these responses to unfurl. This one-half credit course meets three times a week for the first half of the semester. Prerequisites: none. 0.50
MXI 109
30 11 
ENG-108-02
Arthurian Legends
Benedicks C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
From the medieval period until today, the legend of King Arthur and his round table of knights has persisted in the cultural imagination. In this class, we will read some of the most lasting iterations of the Arthurian myths, including the 15th-century classic Le Morte D'Arthur, the 19th-century retelling Idylls of the King, and more modern retellings and films. The class takes as its thesis that each generation creates the Arthurian legends anew to reflect the spirit of the age. This one-half credit course meets three times a week for the second half of the semester. Prerequisites: none. 0.50
MXI 109
30 16 
ENG-110-01F
Intro to Creative Writing
Mong D
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
CEN 305
10
ENG-122-01
Modern Linguistics
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Cross List: ENG-122=MLL-122=HUM-122 0.50
BAX 114
30 11 
ENG-180-01
Environmental Science Fiction
M. Lambert
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
While science fiction often envisions alien civilizations and futuristic forms of technology, the genre has also been used to examine humanity's relationship to the natural world. In this course, we will analyze ways that authors like Ray Bradbury, Philip K. Dick, and Ursula K. Le Guin use the genre to respond to major environmental issues of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries-from the threat of nuclear fallout in the post-World War II era to climate change in the last few decades. We will also analyze the ecological use of the genre in films, video games, and other media. 1.00
CEN 304
30 19 
ENG-180-02
The American Road Trip
Mong D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Wanderlust is a defining feature of the American psyche. Americans invented the automobile and the drive-thru window. They built the Interstate Highway System and-shortly thereafter-left a car on the moon. In this course, we'll explore how roads, cars, and road trips function in American literature and culture, keeping a few pertinent questions on the dashboard as we go: do road trips allow Americans to cross borders of race, class, religion, gender, and sexual identity that they would otherwise not? Who is able to take road trips? Who stays at home? We'll read Jack Kerouac's On the Road (1957) and Walt Whitman's "Song of the Open Road" (1856). We'll watch Ridley Scott's film, Thelma and Louise (1991), and view the photographs of Robert Frank as he crosses the U.S. (The Americans, 1959). We'll follow escaped slaves, post-apocalyptic survivors, and our own eye for interstate exploration. 1.00
CEN 216
30 11 
ENG-218-01
British Lit 1800-1900
Lamberton J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
MXI 109
30 20 
ENG-220-01
Amer Lit after 1900
M. Lambert
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
BAX 311
30 21 
ENG-260-01
Introduction to Black Studies
Lake T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Cross List: ENG-260 = BLS-201. The course will introduce students to the history, methodology and major problems in black studies. This survey will explore the interdisciplinary nature of black studies scholarship and the challenges it presents to traditional academic models. The issue of the politicization of the academy and the relationship between black scholarship production and service to the black community will also be covered. The course will draw from a number of literary sources (Toni Morrison, Houston Barker, Henry Louis Gates), cultural theorist (bell hooks, Mark Anthony Neal, Cornel West) and historical works (Nell Painter, John H. Franklin, Alberto Raboteau.) This course will serve students interested in the study of the black experience. All majors are welcomed. Prerequisites: none. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
CEN 305
30 25 
ENG-270-01
Latinx Culture on the Margins
Aikens N
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: ENG-270-01 = HSP-270. This course will explore blended representations of U.S. Latinx identity through fiction, non-fiction, and film. We will draw connections between the theme and form of a literature, which in its mixing and blending of genres reflects the mixing and blending of diverse Latinx identities. We'll consider the blurring of reality and fiction with texts such as Piri Thomas's memoir Down These Mean Streets (1967), Junot Diaz's autobiographical fiction The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007). In Daisy Hernandez's A Cup of Water under My Bed (2014) we'll explore the intersectional marginalization that U.S. Latinx people undergo. Jim Mendiola's quasi-documentary Pretty Vacant (1996) will help us continue to identify additional border identities. We'll also examine at least one of Jaime Hernandez's graphic novels from the 1980s to present in his Love and Rockets series, delving into Hernandez's representation of himself as his female protagonist. Finally, we'll consider the borders of alive/dead, human/machine, past/present, and present/future with Latinx futurisms in novels such as Salvador Plascencia's The People of Paper (2005) and films such as Alex Rivera's award-winning Sleep Dealer (2008), Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina's Coco (2017), and Robert Rodriguez's cyborg film Alita: Battle Angel (2019) using Gloria Anzalda's Borderlands / La Frontera: The New Mestiza (1987). Prerequisites: none. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
CEN 215
30 29 
ENG-270-02
Literary Adaptation
Freeze E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
This course will examine literary adaptation of short stories, novels, or plays to film. Since the term "adaptation" implies changing, morphing, or translation a text into another aesthetic form, the course will focus not only on the differences of the two texts, but the process of that text's adaptation into another form. In turn, we will learn how to read differently; that is, to expand our skills of textual analysis and theory to include the visual medium of film. We will also investigate how socio/historical/economic forces and audience expectation can shape a work's reception in different contexts. Prerequisites: none. 1.00
BAX 311
30 23 
FRC - FRESHMAN COLLOQUIUM
FRC-101-04
Enduring Questions
E. Yee
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
DET 112
16
FRC-101-05
Enduring Questions
Olofson E
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
BAX 301
13
FRC-101-06
Enduring Questions
Hughes C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
HAY 321
13
FRC-101-08
Enduring Questions
Gower J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
CEN 305
14
FRC-101-10
Enduring Questions
Gunther K
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
BAX 311
12
FRC-101-12
Enduring Questions
Quandt K
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
DET 128
13
FRC-101-15
Enduring Questions
M. Lambert
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
DET 220
14
FRC-101-16
Enduring Questions
Saha S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
BAX 212
15
FRC-101-17
Enduring Questions
S. Kunze
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
MXI 214
13
GEN - GENDER STUDIES
GEN-101-01
Intro to Gender Studies
Abbott J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
DET 209
30
GEN-209-01
Sex, Drugs, and Violence
N. Muszynski
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Cross List: GEN-209=PSY-110. Through the lens of psychological research, this course will introduce students to both mainstream and taboo topics related to sex, drugs, and violence. We will explore both contemporary and historical issues; how one might conduct and interpret research; and how both an individual's mental health and society might be affected by sex, drugs, and violence. Specific topics that we might discuss, read, and learn about throughout the semester include: video game research, addiction, pornography, school shootings, historical research on LSD, current research on ketamine and depression, spanking children, sexuality, female orgasms, electronic cigarettes, and much more. This course will be beneficial to both psychology majors and non-majors alike. Prerequisites: none. 1.00
MXI 109
25 16 
GEN-230-01
Hist Sex & Gend Mod Europe
Rhoades M
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Cross List: GEN-230=HIS-230-01. In this course, students will study issues related to gender and sexuality in modern European history, 1750-present. Students will examine how historians use gender as a category of analysis to understand interpretations of sex and bodily health, scientific developments, labor practices, political systems, and culture more generally. Rather than moving in a strictly chronological fashion our course readings will be topical and chronological. The class includes readings on masculinity and warfare (WWI and the Nazi period); medical treatments for venereal diseases; sex and sexuality in the 19th century city; fears surrounding masturbation; regulation of prostitution; and historical interpretations of men's and women's social roles. Most of the course content focuses on the history of gender and sexuality in Britain, France, and Germany. There will be two exams and several short papers over course readings. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
GOO 104
25 24 
GEN-231-01
The Family, Gender, & Politics
McCrary L
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: GEN-231=PSC-231=PPE-231. Does the family trap people in particular roles? Does a citizen's attachment to his family threaten the power of the state? Or does the family help facilitate a relationship between the individual and society by teaching social values? The Family, Gender, and Politics will explore competing understandings of the family and its impact on political life. The course will trace interpretations of the family from those that require highly differentiated gender roles to those that aspire to more egalitarian roles. We will ask how politics impacts the changing modern family, critically exploring different policy approaches to contemporary issues relating to the family. 1.00
LIB LSEM
18 17 
GEN-303-01
Media and the Body
Geraths C
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Cross List: GEN-303=RHE-370. This course will explore the diverse ways that we talk about-and through-our bodies. Our bodies function as a primary medium for communication: our voices resound, our ears listen, our fingers touch, our knees kneel, our eyes connect, our genitals provoke. Sensation is at the heart of embodied communication. Our abilities to see, hear, smell, taste, and touch both invite particular forms of communication and, too, limit our ability to persuade others. Likewise, bodies are omnipresent in media. Depictions of bodies engaging in myriad activities serve to entertain, inspire, convince, and attack. Media show us bodies at work and at play-sweating in the fields and naked in the throes of passion. Still further, our bodies are fundamentally changed by the media and technologies we use, from headphones and smart watches to vibrators and pharmaceuticals like birth control. Finally, certain bodies (or parts of bodies) are prevented from communicating or being discussed at all. Bodies-and the identities (gender, sexuality, race, ability) they exhibit-can be silenced by other bodies. This course will draw upon recent scholarship in rhetoric, media studies, gender studies, and queer theory. Students will engage in close investigation and discussion of readings, will analyze mediated texts, and will compose and present an original research project. Prerequisites: none. 1.00
FIN FA206
20 16 
GER - GERMAN
GER-377-01
Spe Topics:German Lit&Culture
Tucker B
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
GHL - GLOBAL HEALTH
GHL-177-01
Special Topics
Wetzel E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Cross List: GHL-177=BIO-177 Enrollment through Registrar's Office with Permission from Instructor. The multidisciplinary issues of global health confront everyone on the planet. This course will introduce critical issues and key themes in global health from basic principles to disease burden to collaborative efforts to improve global health. Particular attention will be given to the connection between parasitic-infectious disease and poverty, social determinants of health, and the global burden of disease. Cultural, economic and ethical issues in global health will be discussed. An immersion component following this class is planned for travel to Peru, July 31 -- August 13, 2020 (dates subject to change), and will likely involve travel to urban, mountain, and rainforest areas. Students should expect to make a financial contribution toward the trip. Grades for this course will be recorded as "incompletes" until after the summer immersion trip. Enrollment in the course is limited, competitive, and by application through the instructor; contact Prof. Eric Wetzel (wetzele@wabash.edu) if interested. This course counts toward the Global Health minor; however, it does NOT count toward the major in Biology. Prerequisites: BIO 101 or 111, or the consent of the instructor. Preference may be given to students who have some background in either Spanish, economics, political science, or global health. 1.00
HAY 003
14
GHL-201-01
Sociology & Politics of Health
Gelbman S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Cross List: PSC-201=SOC-201=GHL-201. Registration by Instructor Permission. 1.00
BAX 202
30 28 
GHL-219-01
Medicine, Magic, Miracle
Wickkiser B
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Cross List GHL-219= CLA-213 = HIS-310 Medicine, Magic, Miracle: Healthcare in the Greco-Roman World This course will survey major healers, theories, techniques, and tools for the practice of medicine in Greek and Roman antiquity. We'll look at how 'scientific' medicine developed in contrast to traditional beliefs that pointed to the gods as the cause of illness; we'll delve into Hippocratic medical treatises; we'll consider the devastating effects of plague and other epidemics; we'll visit alternatives such as temple healing and magic; and we'll ponder ancient ethical dilemmas that frame medical practice to this day, concerning, e.g., abortion and assisted suicide. The course is discussion based. Students will give presentations and write a substantial research paper that they will present at the end of the semester. This course counts towards the Global Health minor. Prerequisite: 1 course in Classics or permission of the instructor. 1.00
DET 128
16 15 
HIS - HISTORY
HIS-102-03
World Hist Since 1500
Rhoades M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
GOO 104
25
HIS-200-01
Citizens and Aliens
S. Kunze
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: HIS-200= PSC-210-02. In this course, we will examine, discuss, and analyze American immigration policy, and the twin concepts it created: the citizen and the alien. We will start our inquiry in the mid-nineteenth century by tracing how ideas about immigration developed from state laws into federal statutes. We will examine the establishment, expansion, and contraction of federal legislation through the twentieth century, and will conclude by looking at the Immigration Record and Control Act of 1986, the most recent comprehensive immigration reform enacted in the United States. Through our primary and secondary readings, we will consider the political, economic, and racial dimensions of migration and how they have created enduring legacies that continue to inform American immigration policy to this day. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
BAX 201
20 15 
HIS-201-01
Big History
Warner R
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
1.00
BAX 202
48
HIS-230-01
Hist Sex & Gender Mod Europe
Rhoades M
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Cross List: HIS-230-01=GEN-230. In this course, students will study issues related to gender and sexuality in modern European history, 1750-present. Students will examine how historians use gender as a category of analysis to understand interpretations of sex and bodily health, scientific developments, labor practices, political systems, and culture more generally. Rather than moving in a strictly chronological fashion our course readings will be topical and chronological. The class includes readings on masculinity and warfare (WWI and the Nazi period); medical treatments for venereal diseases; sex and sexuality in the 19th century city; fears surrounding masturbation; regulation of prostitution; and historical interpretations of men's and women's social roles. Most of the course content focuses on the history of gender and sexuality in Britain, France, and Germany. There will be two exams and several short papers over course readings. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
GOO 104
25 23 
HIS-230-02
Topics in Modern Europe
Snow N
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Cross List: HIS-230-02=PPE-265=ECO-205 1.00
BAX 311
25 23 
HIS-240-01
Vietnam War Stories
Thomas S
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
The Vietnam War damaged the trust between the American people and the U.S. government and caused many Americans to question the purpose of military power and conflict. In numerous small towns across America including Crawfordsville, declining economic opportunities collided with traditional notions of patriotism, service, and masculinity to send local youth to the war effort at disproportionate rates. At the same time, on college campuses, young men and women avoided the war and engaged in antiwar protests. Although Wabash College and the Crawfordsville community have often operated as two independent societies segregated along lines of class and opportunity, the Vietnam War and the call to serve widened the divide, juxtaposing local ideas about service, sacrifice and manhood with changing values about the meaning of patriotism, war and masculinity. Some Wabash students including Michael J. Hall and Philip Ducat, enlisted, fought, and died in Vietnam alongside five of their Crawfordsville community peers. Other Wabash men, distanced themselves from the pressures of war and protested against a war they saw as unjust. The "fundamental difference, "between those who serve and those who learn Wabash student Steve Shraber struggled to explain to his Wabash brothers, was "they could kill and we know we can't." Through the collection of oral history narratives of local Vietnam War Veterans, this course will study changing ideas about patriotism, masculinity and service in the Vietnam War era. Students are trained in oral history interviewing techniques, transcription, and the representation of oral evidence. Using the Vietnam War as a guide, the class will read theoretical material about collective memory, the relationship between memory and history, generational memory, trauma and memory, and the challenges and possibilities of co-creating oral narrative as history. Students will audit transcriptions, listen to audio interviews and oral history podcasts as they evaluate how co-creating an interview impacts its meaning. They also engage in listening exercises to deepen their ability to co-create nuanced oral histories. Each student will conduct a series of interviews with selected people associated with the Vietnam War including local Vietnam War veterans, and edit the texts for digital publication. Prerequisites: Two of the following courses: HIS-101, 102, 241, 242, or 243. 1.00
BAX 201
15
HIS-242-01
US 1865-1945
Thomas S
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
MXI 109
25 11 
HIS-260-01
Beijing: Past, Present, Future
Healey C
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Cross List HIS-260=ASI-112 Beijing, China's capital, is one of the world's most populous cities and a remarkable hybrid of old and new. This interdisciplinary course traces the history and culture of Beijing from the thirteenth century to the present, investigating how historical events, politics, and urban planning have shaped the city's character and the lives of its everyday people. We will analyze how Beijing has been portrayed in literature, film, and other media. We will also consider how larger trends like urbanization and global capitalism are shaping Beijing in new ways. This course includes a 2-week immersion trip to Beijing in May. Enrollment by instructor permission only. No prerequisites. 1.00
DET 112
16 10 
HIS-260-02
Music in East Asian Cultures
Makubuya J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Cross List: HIS-260-02=MUS-204-02=ASI-204 "Music in East Asian Cultures". This course, for all students regardless of their background, offers an introductory survey of East Asian musical instruments and their contextual significance in society. Beyond the instruments and their roles in producing musical sound, the course will examine significant ceremonies, rites, and rituals enhanced by music. In addition to being applicable to the distribution requirements, the course serves as a forum for learning about the historical connections that led to the interrelated adoptions and adaptations of musical styles and genres among the Chinese, Indian, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, and Taiwanese (music) cultures. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Credit 1. 1.00
FIN M120
20 18 
HIS-388-01
Independent Study
S. Kunze
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
 
HSP - HISPANIC STUDIES
HSP-270-01
Latinx Culture on the Margins
Aikens N
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: HSP-270 = ENG-270-01. This course will explore blended representations of U.S. Latinx identity through fiction, non-fiction, and film. We will draw connections between the theme and form of a literature, which in its mixing and blending of genres reflects the mixing and blending of diverse Latinx identities. We'll consider the blurring of reality and fiction with texts such as Piri Thomas's memoir Down These Mean Streets (1967), Junot Diaz's autobiographical fiction The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007). In Daisy Hernandez's A Cup of Water under My Bed (2014) we'll explore the intersectional marginalization that U.S. Latinx people undergo. Jim Mendiola's quasi-documentary Pretty Vacant (1996) will help us continue to identify additional border identities. We'll also examine at least one of Jaime Hernandez's graphic novels from the 1980s to present in his Love and Rockets series, delving into Hernandez's representation of himself as his female protagonist. Finally, we'll consider the borders of alive/dead, human/machine, past/present, and present/future with Latinx futurisms in novels such as Salvador Plascencia's The People of Paper (2005) and films such as Alex Rivera's award-winning Sleep Dealer (2008), Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina's Coco (2017), and Robert Rodriguez's cyborg film Alita: Battle Angel (2019) using Gloria Anzalda's Borderlands / La Frontera: The New Mestiza (1987). Prerequisites: none. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
TBA TBA
30 28 
HUM - HUMANITIES
HUM-122-01
Modern Linguistics
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Cross List: HUM-122=MLL-122 0.50
BAX 114
30 25 
HUM-295-01
Relig & Repres of Holocaust
Phillips G
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: HUM-295 = REL-295 = ART-210-02. This course examines different representations of the Holocaust in theology, literature, film, and art. Some of the questions and concerns the course raises includes: What are the limits to representing suffering and trauma? Is it legitimate to write poetry and fiction, paint and compose music, film documentaries and TV comedies, draw cartoons and graphic novels, publish photographs and erect monuments about such horrific events? How does visual media facilitate the raising of profound moral and religious questions about the Holocaust and the violence associated with it? What do representations of the atrocities of the Holocaust convey to later generations of Jews and Christians? Can Holocaust experiences be understood and interpreted in religious terms? This interdisciplinary course examines the creative and material work of historians, theologians, novelists, poets, graphic novelists, painters, film makers, composers, photographers, and museum architects as they grapple with these questions in response to the Holocaust. One credit. No prerequisites. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
CEN 305
20 19 
HUM-296-01
Parables Jewish Christian Trad
Phillips G
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Cross List: HUM-296=REL-296. This course examines the parable as a distinctive literary form employed by Jews and Christians to communicate profound religious truths. Parables are subversive stories, word images that challenge conventional theological and moral perceptions. By design, the parable's enigmatic and riddling character presses readers to the limits of reason, belief, and action. The course investigates how parables work linguistically and literarily, who employs them, how readers defend against them, and why religious traditions worth their salt both need and resist them. Among the ancient and modern Jewish and Christian parablers to be studied are Jesus and the Gospel writers, the Rabbis and Hasidim, Kierkegaard and Kafka, Wiesel and Buber, Cohen and Crossan. We will also examine visual parables in the artwork of post-Holocaust painter Samuel Bak and in the film "Fight Club. The course engages the study of literature, Jewish and Christian theology, art, and religious responses to the modern world. One credit. No prerequisites. 1.00
CEN 300
20 18 
MAT - MATHEMATICS
MAT-106-01
Financial Mathematics
Thompson P
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
The first half of the course focuses on mathematical approaches to analyzing bonds, in particular the sorts of issues a portfolio manager would be interested in. Topics covered include the time value of money, bond pricing for option-free bonds, yield measures, the yield curve, spot rates, forward rates, return analysis, and duration as a measure of price volatility. The second half of the course deals with mathematical issues associated with financial derivatives. This course does not count toward the mathematics major or minor. It will count toward the mathematics and science distribution or the quantitative literacy requirements. Prerequisites: none. 1.00
GOO 101
20
MAT-106-02
Math Voting & Electoral System
Turner W, Hollander E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Cross List: MAT-106 = PSC-220 Voting and elections are the cornerstone of every democracy. They are how we the people tell the government what we want. Yet, complaints about the electoral process are as old as democracy itself. Even today - especially today - issues like Gerrymandering and the Electoral College have us questioning whether or no ordinary citizens really are qualified to make political decisions. "The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything." - Joseph Stalin In this course, we will exam the variety of ways that voters decide and votes are counted. Are some electoral systems better than others? Are some fairer than others? Are those even the same thing? One unique feature of this course is that we will examine these issues from political and mathematical perspectives. Can math help us measure the proportionality, fairness, efficiency or effectiveness of a political system? Can it help us find solutions for the democratic dilemma? This course is cross-listed as MAT-106 and PSC-220. As such, it can be used to satisfy the Quantitative Skills, Quantitative Literacy, or Behavioral Science distribution credits. 1.00
HAY 002
25
MAT-111-01
Calculus I
McKinney C
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00
HAY 003
30 20 
MLL - MODERN LANGUAGES
MLL-122-01
Modern Linguistics
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Cross List: MLL-122=HUM-122=ENG-122 0.50
BAX 114
30 23 
MUS - MUSIC
MUS-051-01
Brass Ensemble (No Credit)
Downey C
W
07:00PM - 08:30PM
0.00
TBA TBA
15 15 
MUS-052-01
Chamber Orchestra (No Credit)
Abel A
M
04:15PM - 05:45PM
0.00
TBA TBA
15 14 
MUS-053-01
T/Tones & Glee Club
K. Millington
M TU W TH
04:15PM - 06:00PM
0.00
TBA TBA
50 44 
MUS-055-01
Jazz Ensemble (no Credit)
Pazera C
TU
07:00PM - 09:00PM
0.00
TBA TBA
15 15 
MUS-056-01
Wamidan Wld Music Ens (No Cr)
Makubuya J
W F
05:00PM - 06:00PM
0.00
TBA TBA
15 14 
MUS-101-01
Music in Society: A History
Ables M
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
FIN M140
20
MUS-104-01
Music & Sound Design in Multim
Renk C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
FIN A113
11
MUS-151-01
Brass Ensemble
Downey C
W
07:00PM - 08:30PM
0.50
TBA TBA
15 11 
MUS-152-01
Chamber Orchestra
Abel A
M
04:15PM - 05:45PM
0.50
TBA TBA
15 14 
MUS-153-01
T/Tones & Glee Club
K. Millington
M TU W TH
04:15PM - 06:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
50 23 
MUS-155-01
Jazz Ensemble
Pazera C
TU
07:00PM - 09:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
15 11 
MUS-156-01
Wamidan World Music Ensemble
Makubuya J
W F
05:00PM - 06:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
15 11 
MUS-160-07
Beginning Applied Music
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-202-01
Instruments & Culture
Makubuya J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
FIN M140
20 15 
MUS-204-02
Music in East Asian Cultures
Makubuya J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Cross List: MUS-204-02=HIS-260-02=ASI-204 "Music in East Asian Cultures". This course, for all students regardless of their background, offers an introductory survey of East Asian musical instruments and their contextual significance in society. Beyond the instruments and their roles in producing musical sound, the course will examine significant ceremonies, rites, and rituals enhanced by music. In addition to being applicable to the distribution requirements, the course serves as a forum for learning about the historical connections that led to the interrelated adoptions and adaptations of musical styles and genres among the Chinese, Indian, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, and Taiwanese (music) cultures. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Credit 1. 1.00
FIN M120
20 19 
MUS-223-01
Digital Sound Synthesis
Renk C
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
FIN M140
15
NSC - NEUROSCIENCE
NSC-204-01
Principles of Neuroscience
Gunther K
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Cross List: NSC-204=PSY-204 1.00
BAX 312
7
PE - PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE-011-01
Advanced Fitness
D. Morel
M TU TH F
06:45AM - 07:45AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PHI - PHILOSOPHY
PHI-217-01
Philosophy of Race
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: PHI-217 = BLS-280 = PPE-217. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
CEN 304
18 10 
PHI-242-01
Found. of Modern Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
CEN 304
20
PHI-270-01
Elem Symbolic Logic
Carlson M
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
CEN 215
35 22 
PHI-272-01
Philosophy of Science
Carlson M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
BAX 301
18
PHI-299-01
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PHI-299=EDU-201=BLS-270=PPE-228 1.00
MXI 214
18 17 
PHI-388-01
Independent Study
Carlson M
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
 
PHY - PHYSICS
PHY-101-01
Astronomy
J. Ross
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: PHY-101L 1.00
GOO 104
42
PHY-110-01
Fluids and Fields
N. Tompkins
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CoReq PHY-110L. 1.00
GOO 104
42 14 
PHY-278-01
Physics of Manhattan Project
Brown J
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
This course will explore the physics, history, and ongoing impacts of the development of nuclear weapons. Topics to be addressed include atomic and nuclear structure, nuclear fission, criticality, and radioactivity. Students in this course should have some knowledge of quantum mechanics and be at least familiar with differential equations. Prerequisites: PHY-210 or CHE-351. 1.00
GOO 305
16
PPE - PHILOSOPHY POLITICS ECONOMICS
PPE-217-01
Philosophy of Race
Trott A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross list: PPE-217 = PHI-217 = BLS-280. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
CEN 304
13
PPE-218-01
Philosophy of Commerce
Gower J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Cross List: PPE-218=PHI-218=PHI-218-01F 1.00
CEN 215
30 25 
PPE-228-01
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Cross Listed PPE-228=EDU-201=PHI-299=BLS-270 1.00
MXI 214
18 15 
PPE-231-01
The Family, Gender, & Politics
McCrary L
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: PPE-231=PSC-231=GEN-231 Does the family trap people in particular roles? Does a citizen's attachment to his family threaten the power of the state? Or does the family help facilitate a relationship between the individual and society by teaching social values? The Family, Gender, and Politics will explore competing understandings of the family and its impact on political life. The course will trace interpretations of the family from those that require highly differentiated gender roles to those that aspire to more egalitarian roles. We will ask how politics impacts the changing modern family, critically exploring different policy approaches to contemporary issues relating to the family. 1.00
LIB LSEM
18 14 
PPE-265-01
History of Economic Thought
Snow N
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Cross List: PPE-265=ECO-205=HIS-230-02 1.00
BAX 311
25 18 
PSC - POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSC-121-01
Intro to Comparative Politics
R. Rivera
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
DET 109
35
PSC-201-01
Sociology & Politics of Health
Gelbman S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Cross List: PSC-201=SOC-201=GHL-201. Registration by Instructor Permission. 1.00
BAX 202
30 27 
PSC-210-01
Rhetoric of US Social Movmnts
Drury J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Cross List: PSC-210=RHE-270. Why do people join social movements? How do people use rhetoric in movements to achieve their goals? What impact and legacy do U.S. social movements have? What are the best practices for movement organizers and members? These are some of the questions this course will address as it examines theories of social movements and applies them to a variety of cases. The course will engage primary texts from historical and contemporary movements as well as secondary, scholarly texts from fields such as rhetoric, sociology, and political science. Students will undertake independent research about the rhetorical strategies and tactics of social movements, culminating in an essay and class presentation. Prerequisites: none. 1.00
FIN FA206
25 21 
PSC-210-02
Citizens and Aliens
S. Kunze
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: PSC-210-02=HIS-200. In this course, we will examine, discuss, and analyze American immigration policy, and the twin concepts it created: the citizen and the alien. We will start our inquiry in the mid-nineteenth century by tracing how ideas about immigration developed from state laws into federal statutes. We will examine the establishment, expansion, and contraction of federal legislation through the twentieth century, and will conclude by looking at the Immigration Record and Control Act of 1986, the most recent comprehensive immigration reform enacted in the United States. Through our primary and secondary readings, we will consider the political, economic, and racial dimensions of migration and how they have created enduring legacies that continue to inform American immigration policy to this day. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
BAX 201
20 12 
PSC-220-01
Math Voting & Electoral System
Turner W, Hollander E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Cross List: PSC-220 = MAT-106 Voting and elections are the cornerstone of every democracy. They are how we the people tell the government what we want. Yet, complaints about the electoral process are as old as democracy itself. Even today - especially today - issues like Gerrymandering and the Electoral College have us questioning whether or no ordinary citizens really are qualified to make political decisions. "The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything." - Joseph Stalin In this course, we will exam the variety of ways that voters decide and votes are counted. Are some electoral systems better than others? Are some fairer than others? Are those even the same thing? One unique feature of this course is that we will examine these issues from political and mathematical perspectives. Can math help us measure the proportionality, fairness, efficiency or effectiveness of a political system? Can it help us find solutions for the democratic dilemma? This course is cross-listed as MAT-106 and PSC-220. As such, it can be used to satisfy the Quantitative Skills, Quantitative Literacy, or Behavioral Science distribution credits. 1.00
HAY 002
25 17 
PSC-231-01
The Family, Gender, & Politics
McCrary L
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: PSC-231 = GEN-231 = PPE-231. Does the family trap people in particular roles? Does a citizen's attachment to his family threaten the power of the state? Or does the family help facilitate a relationship between the individual and society by teaching social values? The Family, Gender, and Politics will explore competing understandings of the family and its impact on political life. The course will trace interpretations of the family from those that require highly differentiated gender roles to those that aspire to more egalitarian roles. We will ask how politics impacts the changing modern family, critically exploring different policy approaches to contemporary issues relating to the family. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
LIB LSEM
18
PSY - PSYCHOLOGY
PSY-101-02
Introduction to Psychology
Olofson E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
BAX 101
40
PSY-204-01
Principles of Neuroscience
Gunther K
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Cross List: PSY-204=NSC-204 1.00
BAX 312
7
PSY-210-01
Psychology of Sport
Bost P
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
In this course, students will explore the psychological forces at work in and around competitive sports. Topics will include, but not be limited to, tradition and ritual, fandom, gambling, locker-room dynamics, concussions, youth competition, advanced statistical analytics, and the science of high-level athletic performance. The course will intersect several major subdisciplines of psychology, including cognition, development, neuroscience, statistics, health psychology, and social psychology. Prerequisites: At least one course credit in PSY. 1.00
BAX 202
25 12 
REL - RELIGION
REL-162-01
His & Lit of the New Testament
Phillips G
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Rel-162=CLA-162 1.00
CEN 216
50 22 
REL-172-01
Reformation to Modern Era
Baer J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
CEN 216
50 21 
REL-260-01
Ancient Christianity in Rome
Nelson D
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Cross List REL-260=CLA-212. Enrollment through Registrar Office With Permission from Instructor. This course is dedicated to the study of Early Christianity as it was manifested in one particular place, the deeply-charged and long-standing imperial capital of Rome. This cross-listed and team-taught immersion course addresses one central question with multiple off-shoots: How did Christianity take shape in Rome? How did it emerge from, rebel against, and engage with that city's deep past? Before Constantine, what was the experience of early Christians? After Constantine, how did the shape and character of the city (not to mention its inhabitants) change? What did early adherents of Christianity believe, and how were those beliefs negotiated, enhanced, challenged, and made orthodox through visual and material culture, especially religious architecture and its decoration? What was the experience of practitioners of traditional Greco-Roman religion after Christianity became the default religion of the Empire? In other words, our investigation will be about social history, architecture, religious history and theology, and art/iconography. It is about the realia of what people believed, saw, experienced, and did. And the best way to get a sense of those features of ancient life and belief is to visit the key places themselves: the city of Rome and, as a complement to the features of the urban experience that Rome lacks, its port city of Ostia. 1.00
CEN 216
16
REL-273-01
Theologies of Protestant Refor
Nelson D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
The social movement spawned by Martin Luther's (1483-1546) protests against certain church practices and theologies in the later Middle Ages led to more upheaval and creativity than in any other period in history. This course will examine the causes of the Protestant Reformation, explore key texts of Luther's theological writings, and analyze what the effects have been, for good or ill, of the movement's legacy. Special attention will be given to Luther's writings on freedom and the relationship of the church to the temporal authority (what we would call the "state".) We also will compare those views with the views of other reformers, such as Calvin, Zwingli and Muntzer. Prerequisites: REL 171 or 172 recommended, but not required. 0.50
MXI 214
20 13 
REL-273-02
Bonhoeffer & Strug Agnst Nazis
Nelson D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906-1945) was one of the greatest theologians of the 20th century, despite dying an early death at the hands of the Nazis. A Lutheran pastor and near-pacifist, he was involved with a plot to assassinate Hitler and was hanged for it, but not before producing a number of fascinating theological works about community, vocation, discipleship and politics. In this course we will learn about his remarkable life as well as engage key texts from his theological writings. Prerequisites: REL 171 or 172 recommended, but not required. 0.50
MXI 214
20 16 
REL-280-01
Lew Wallace & American Relig
Baer J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Crawfordsville's own Lew Wallace wore many hats: attorney, artist, Union general in the Civil War, governor of the New Mexico Territory, and famous author. Wallace's Ben Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1880) was by most accounts either the first or second best-selling American novel of the nineteenth century, and it had a long afterlife on stage and in many feature films. In this seminar, we will examine Wallace's life and legacy, along with what Ben Hur and his other works reveal about American religion and culture in his era and beyond. One credit. No prerequisites. 1.00
CEN 300
20
REL-280-02
Jesus in America
Baer J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
This seminar will examine portrayals of Jesus in American history, religion, and culture. From God incarnate to compassionate friend, liberator to countercultural icon, baby in a manger to personal savior, Jesus has been represented in numerous ways in the American context. Utilizing stories, histories, films, and art, we will analyze changing American perceptions of Jesus and their role in American history and culture. One credit. No prerequisites. 1.00
CEN 305
20 10 
REL-290-02
Topics Comp Rel: Symbol & Myth
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Topics in Comparative Religion: Symbol & Myth. 2nd Half-Semester. Do myths and symbols belong in the skill-set of people living in a modern scientific world? Or are they playthings for nerds or soft-minded romantics? What exactly are symbols? Myths? What do they do? Are they socially constructed? Archetypal? Something else? How important are they for religion? Can you have a religion that's "demythologized"? Should you? These are some of the questions that we'll tackle in this half-course. We'll read selections from, among others, Mircea Eliade and Wendy Doniger, as well as their critics. Using film and other media, we'll also read or look at a variety of myths, both ancient and modern. .5 course credit. 2nd half-semester. Prerequisites: None. Course limited to 20. 0.50
MXI 109
20
REL-295-01
Relig & Repres of Holocaust
Phillips G
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Cross List: REL-295 = HUM-295 = ART-210-02 This course examines different representations of the Holocaust in theology, literature, film, and art. Some of the questions and concerns the course raises includes: What are the limits to representing suffering and trauma? Is it legitimate to write poetry and fiction, paint and compose music, film documentaries and TV comedies, draw cartoons and graphic novels, publish photographs and erect monuments about such horrific events? How does visual media facilitate the raising of profound moral and religious questions about the Holocaust and the violence associated with it? What do representations of the atrocities of the Holocaust convey to later generations of Jews and Christians? Can Holocaust experiences be understood and interpreted in religious terms? This interdisciplinary course examines the creative and material work of historians, theologians, novelists, poets, graphic novelists, painters, film makers, composers, photographers, and museum architects as they grapple with these questions in response to the Holocaust. One credit. No prerequisites. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
CEN 305
20 16 
REL-296-01
Parables Jewish Christian Trad
Phillips G
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Cross List: REL-296 = HUM-296. This course examines the parable as a distinctive literary form employed by Jews and Christians to communicate profound religious truths. Parables are subversive stories, word images that challenge conventional theological and moral perceptions. By design, the parable's enigmatic and riddling character presses readers to the limits of reason, belief, and action. The course investigates how parables work linguistically and literarily, who employs them, how readers defend against them, and why religious traditions worth their salt both need and resist them. Among the ancient and modern Jewish and Christian parablers to be studied are Jesus and the Gospel writers, the Rabbis and Hasidim, Kierkegaard and Kafka, Wiesel and Buber, Cohen and Crossan. We will also examine visual parables in the artwork of post-Holocaust painter Samuel Bak and in the film "Fight Club. The course engages the study of literature, Jewish and Christian theology, art, and religious responses to the modern world. One credit. No prerequisites. 1.00
CEN 300
20
REL-298-01
Sociology of Religion
E. Yee
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
CEN 304
25 18 
RHE - RHETORIC
RHE-101-03
Public Speaking
Abbott J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
FIN FA206
20
RHE-140-01
Argumentation & Debate
Drury J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
FIN FA206
20
RHE-270-02
Rhetoric of US Social Movmnts
Drury J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Cross List: RHE-270-02=PSC-210. Why do people join social movements? How do people use rhetoric in movements to achieve their goals? What impact and legacy do U.S. social movements have? What are the best practices for movement organizers and members? These are some of the questions this course will address as it examines theories of social movements and applies them to a variety of cases. The course will engage primary texts from historical and contemporary movements as well as secondary, scholarly texts from fields such as rhetoric, sociology, and political science. Students will undertake independent research about the rhetorical strategies and tactics of social movements, culminating in an essay and class presentation. Prerequisites: none. 1.00
FIN FA206
25
RHE-290-01
Deliberation & Democracy
Drury S
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Deliberation is a process through which public conversations occur and decisions can be made. During deliberation, citizens come together, share opinions, critique arguments and reasons, expand their understanding and perspective, and ultimately, seek to make public choices about pressing problems in their community. In this course, we will explore the theories and practices of democratic deliberation, evaluate the potentials for and limits of deliberation, and discuss and evaluate framing and facilitation techniques in diverse settings such as community meetings, strategic planning, and business. Assignments will include practice facilitations and deliberations, public facilitations, theory response papers, and a deliberation project. This class qualifies as a Language Studies credit. One course credit. This course is enrolled through permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: none. 1.00
FIN FA206
 
SOC - SOCIOLOGY
SOC-201-01
Sociology & Politics of Health
Gelbman S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Cross List: PSC-201=SOC-201=GHL-201. Registration by Instructor Permission. 1.00
BAX 202
30
SPA - SPANISH
SPA-103-01
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Rogers D
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Requires SPA-103 placement, Co-Requisite: SPA-103L 1.00
DET 212
18 10 
SPA-103L-01
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
E. Herrera, Rogers D
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103 0.00
DET 128
6
SPA-103L-02
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
E. Herrera, Rogers D
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103 0.00
DET 226
6
SPA-103L-03
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
E. Herrera, Rogers D
TH
08:45AM - 09:35AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-103 0.00
DET 226
6
SPA-201L-01
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
E. Herrera, Monsalve M
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 226
6
SPA-201L-02
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
E. Herrera, Monsalve M
TU
08:45AM - 09:35AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 128
6
SPA-201L-03
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
E. Herrera, Monsalve M
TU
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 111
6
SPA-201L-04
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
E. Herrera, Monsalve M
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 226
6
SPA-201L-05
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
E. Herrera, Monsalve M
TH
02:40PM - 03:30PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 128
6
SPA-201L-06
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
E. Herrera, Monsalve M
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Co-Requisite: SPA-201 0.00
DET 226
6
SPA-202L-05
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
S. Carralero Fernandez, Hardy J
F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
Co-Requisite: SPA-202 0.00
DET 226
6
THE - THEATER
THE-103-01
Devised Theater
H. Vogel
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Devised Theater is a creative, collaborative act of teamwork. Through improvisation, and a blend of techniques and experiences informed by theater, dance, visual arts, creative writing, and music, students create new theater as a team. Starting with texts and movement sequences, students construct solo, duets and group improvisations and performances. This course is suitable for interested students of all majors, but students who have a particular interest or experience in Theater, Art, Film & Digital Media, Music, and/or Creative Writing, are particularly encouraged to enroll. 1.00
FIN EXP
20
THE-203-01
Costume Design
Bear A
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
FIN TGRR
12
THE-204-01
World Cinema
Abbott M
M F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
W
02:10PM - 04:00PM
This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
FIN M120
FIN M120
30
THE-209-01
Dramaturgy
H. Vogel
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
In Scene Study and Dramaturgy, students examine the journey "from page to stage." Students learn how to perform textual analysis and historical research, and also discover how these practices help directors, actors, and designers bring a script and characters to life. Students learn hands-on with in-class performance and analysis of plays, as well as by having dramaturgical and research assistant responsibilities on a Wabash mainstage production. 1.00
FIN EXP
16
THE-218-01
The Multicultural Stage
Cherry J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Cross List: THE-218 = ENG-310. This course will examine multicultural and intercultural theater and performance both in the United States and around the world. From the shadow puppet theaters (piyingxi) of China to the Black Arts Repertory Theatre of Harlem, live performance has always expressed of the values, cultures, and histories of the diverse racial and ethnic groups in America and throughout the world. The course will be roughly divided into two sections: the first part of the course will focus on how theater has served as a way for members of historically-marginalized racial and ethnic groups to express identity in America. The second part of the course will offer an overview of the state of contemporary global performance. This course will satisfy the Diversity Requirement for the PPE major. 1.00
FIN TGRR
15
THE-303-01
London: Modern City
Abbott M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
This course will consider London as the locus for what is and was Modern. We will spend one week in London attending and reviewing theater performances, visiting Museums (particularly Tate Modern and The Design Museum), visiting landmark Mod culture sites (e.g. the legendary Troubadour Club (est. 1954), Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club in Soho, the British Music Experience Museum, Twickenham Film Studios, Bar Italia's Scooter Club) tracking the rise and evolution of Mod culture in London. Prior to the trip, we will study plays, films, music, fashion, architecture, and television documenting the rise of Mod culture in 1960s London. We will track its evolution through 80s punk and beyond, studying London's trend-setting nature and its continual effort to define and redefine what is Modern. We will also see theater productions representing a wide range of theater companies, conceptual approaches, and modes of production. Enrollment through Registrar's Office with permission from instructor. 1.00
FIN TGRR
15