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The Frederick Douglass Jazz Works

The Frederick Douglass Jazz Works

February 20, 2024 7:00pm

Salter Hall

Ruth Naomi Floyd

Ruth Naomi Floyd presents, “Frederick Douglass Jazz Works,” created in honor of Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), an enslaved African in America who escaped to freedom and became a leading orator, political activist, abolitionist, writer, banker, ambassador, theologian and statesman. In this work, Floyd presents jazz comprised of her original compositions paired with the actual words from the speeches and writings of this powerful, timeless luminary. Illustrated through the art form of jazz improvisational music, the “Frederick Douglass Jazz Works” illuminates the themes of tragedy, grief, despair, and injustice of American slavery but through the multi-faceted prism of hope, joy, perseverance, and triumph— all with Frederick Douglass’s own words.

The Power of Photography

The Power of Photography

February 20, 2024 Noon

Korb Classroom, Fine Arts Center

Ruth Naomi Floyd

Was Frederick Douglass one of the first "Influencers" ?
Explore with Ruth Floyd, Educator, renowned Jazz composer and Award Winning Fine Art Photographer-how Frederick Douglass purposefully utilized his image to change cultural perception .

Frederick Douglass, an influential figure in American history, was the most photographed American of the 19th century. In his lecture titled "Pictures and Progress," Douglass presented the new technology of photography and how to utilize it to challenge the dehumanizing and stereotypical depictions of African Americans in media. Douglass emphasized the importanceof reclaiming the power of self-representation to promote more accurate and empoweringimages of African Americans during a time when such representations were rare.

Resenting Offenders: A Liberal Cause

Resenting Offenders: A Liberal Cause

March 12, 2024 Noon

Baxter 101

Tony Hernandez

Clearly, anger has awful and destructive tendencies. And yet, we admit that anger has pious qualities, at least when in the form of righteous indignation. This raises a question: is the anger that victims feel towards their offenders justified? Many people believe so.
Anger is commonly said to restore one's dignity after suffering an offense. However, it's not at all clear how anger can do this.
To support this common view, Dr. Hernandez will show in this talk how anger prevents victims from thinking of themselves as worth less than their offender, a thought they acquire by empathy with him. Because this kind of empathy is prevented by anger, he argues that its justification rests on liberal grounds.

The Importance of Merit in the Sciences: The Perspectives of Two Immigrant Women

The Importance of Merit in the Sciences: The Perspectives of Two Immigrant Women

March 19, 2024 12:00pm

Hays 104

Dr. Anna Krylov and Dr. Luana Maroja

We will present a roundtable discussion on the importance of merit in the sciences. Dr. Anna Krylov and Dr. Luana Maroja will lead a conversation on merit, science, free speech, and the intrusion of identity politics into the modern scientific enterprise. After sharing their lived experiences, our speakers will welcome questions from the audience.

2024 Humanomics Symposium at Creighton University on Innovation, Religion, and the State of the World

March 22, 2024

Creighton University

Constitutional Structures and Civic Virtues with Robert P. George

Constitutional Structures and Civic Virtues with Robert P. George

March 28, 2024 7:00pm

Baxter 101

Robert P. George

Robert P. George, McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence and director of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University, has accepted an invitation coordinated by the Wabash College Republicans and to be sponsored by The Stephenson Institute for Classical Liberalism. The Institute will further facilitate a series of reading and discussion groups on core pieces of George’s past scholarship including Making Men Moral (1995) and Natural Law, Liberalism, and Morality (2001).

The Fabric of Civilization

The Fabric of Civilization

April 2, 2024 12:00pm

Baxter 101

Virginia Postrel

Virginia Postrel is an author, columnist, and speaker whose work spans a broad range of topics, from social science to fashion, concentrating on the intersection of culture, commerce, and technology. She is a visiting fellow at the Smith Institute for Political Economy and Philosophy at Chapman University, where she teaches classes combining the humanities and economics.

Her latest book The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World, was published in November 2020 by Basic Books and is available as an audiobook. It examines the development of technology, industry, and commerce through the history of textiles, from prehistoric times to the near future.

Guest Lecturer Terry L. Anderson

Guest Lecturer Terry L. Anderson

April 16, 2024 12:00pm

Baxter 101

Terry L. Anderson

Terry L. Anderson has been a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution since 1998 and is currently the John and Jean De Nault Senior Fellow (adjunct). He is the past president of the Property and Environment Research Center in Bozeman, MT, and a Professor Emeritus at Montana State University where he won many teaching awards during his 25 year career.

Anderson is one of the founders of “free market environmentalism,” the idea of using markets and property rights to solve environmental problems, and in 2015 published the third edition of his co-authored book by that title. He is author or editor of 39 books, including most recently, Unlocking the Wealth of Indian Nations (2016), exploring the institutional underpinnings of American Indian reservation economies.

Past Programs

Ama-Gi Lecture: Why Does Racial Inequality Persist?

Ama-Gi Lecture: Why Does Racial Inequality Persist?

Reception and Book Signing 7pm Littell Lobby

December 5, 2023 Lecture begins at 8:00pm

Salter Hall

Dr. Glenn Loury


Lunch Talk: "Naked Emperor Equalibria are Unstable"
Baxter 101
Noon- Lunch Provided
Free Books


Glenn Loury, the Merton P. Stoltz Professor of the Social Sciences and Professor of Economics at Brown University is arguably the most important public voice in America today. At the age of 33, Loury was the first African American professor of economics at Harvard University to gain tenure and similarly the first black economists to be appointed as a distinguished fellow of the American Economic Association. His podcast, The Glenn Show is a tour de force of engaged and relevant social commentary offering insight and critical reflection on all matters political, economic and social. In particular he has carved out a consistent a principled position on matters of American race relations and stands in strong and vocal opposition to modern efforts to racialize criminal justice reform, affirmative action in higher education, and slave reparations.

Dante, Islamic-Judaic Rationalism, and the Doctrine of Double Truth

Dante, Islamic-Judaic Rationalism, and the Doctrine of Double Truth

November 14, 2023 12:00pm

Center 216

Alexander Schmid

Alexander Schmid is a doctoral candidate in the Comparative Literature Program and doctoral student in the Political Science Department at Louisiana State University. Last year, Schmid received a Phi Kappa Phi Research Grant to present a paper at the Dante Society of America Biennial New College Conference, and he was selected to present his research again at Harvard University’s Institute of World Literature in Mainz, Germany Summer 2022, for which he received full tuition funding. This year, Schmid has four academic publications forthcoming: one in the Dickinson College Commentaries series, another in the Journal of Contextual Economics, a third in a special issue of Humanities, and his fourth is a short review article on Columbia University’s Digital Dante website in Early Modern Digital Review. He is also organizing a panel for the Dante Society of America at the Renaissance Society of America’s 2024 meeting and is set to complete his dissertation in late 2024.

Immigration: A Government Made Crisis

Immigration: A Government Made Crisis

November 7, 2023 12:00pm

Baxter 114

Benjamin Powell

Benjamin Powell is the Executive Director of the Free Market Institute at Texas Tech University and a Professor of Economics in the Rawls College of Business and a Senior Fellow with the Independent Institute. His research draws from Public Choice and comparative economics to investigate topics such as immigration and international economic development.

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Liberalism and the Global Economy: Bretton Woods at 80 Years

Liberalism and the Global Economy: Bretton Woods at 80 Years

Mont Pelerin Society Annual Meeting in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire

October 29, 2023 - November 1, 2023

Professor D’Amico will be attending the annual meetings and escorting a group of 3-4 Wabash students to serve as support staff in conjunction with American Institute for Economic Research to assist in the conference operations.

Manufacturing Militarism: US Government Propaganda in the War on Terror

Manufacturing Militarism: US Government Propaganda in the War on Terror

(co-authored with Christopher Coyne)

October 24, 2023 12:00pm

Baxter 101

Abigail R. Hall

Abigail R. Hall is an Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Tampa. Her work surrounds issue related to U.S. defense policy and militarism. She particularly leverages theories from Austrian economics, Public Choice, New Institutional Economics and Constitutional Political Economy to investigate questions surrounding police militarization, war financing, and foreign interventionism.

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Adam Smith on Social and Political Stability

Adam Smith on Social and Political Stability

October 10, 2023 12:00pm

Center 216

Remy Debes

Remy Debes is a Professor and Chair of Philosophy at the University of Memphis. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of The Southern Journal of Philosophy. Debes specializes in Ethics and the History of Ethics, particularly human dignity, respect, empathy, metaethics, and French and British enlightenment moral theory.

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Why You Should Pay Attention to India

Why You Should Pay Attention to India

October 3, 2023 12:00pm

Baxter 101

Shruti Rajagopalan

Shruti Rajagopalan is a Senior Research Fellow at the Mercatus Center and a Fellow at the Classical Liberal Institute at New York University School of Law. Rajagopalan’s research applies key concepts from Austrian economics, Law and Economics, Public Choice and Constitutional Political Economy to better understand the legal, economic and social development of India historically and over time. While colonially founded by Britain and imbued with many typical features of the common law, India also hosts a very unique role of religion in its society as well as a strongly embedded and informally enforced caste system. Rajagopalan’s manuscripts often investigate how standard theories of constitutional legal operation and economic development interact and relate to these uniquely Indian cultural conditions.

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What Really Drives the Economy: Consumer Spending, Business Investment, or Government Stimulus?

What Really Drives the Economy: Consumer Spending, Business Investment, or Government Stimulus?

September 19, 2023

Mark Skousen

Professor Mark Skousen, Presidential Fellow at The George L. Argyros School of Business and Economics, Chapman University, will present research surrounding his innovative approach to empirically measuring the economic potentials and health of countries. His measure of Gross Output as opposed to conventional GDP or GNP measures, aims to track the total economic activity in the production of new goods and services in an accounting period and has been widely adopted and applied by the international institutions and agencies including the World Bank. While on campus, professor Skousen will also deliver guest lectures and meet with students on the topics of “Financial Economics: Why It’s Tough but Not Impossible to Beat the Market.” And “Say’s Law vs Keynes’ Law”.

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DRUNK: How we Sipped, Danced, and Stumbled our way to Civilization

DRUNK: How we Sipped, Danced, and Stumbled our way to Civilization

September 11, 2023

Edward Slingerland

Professor Edward Slingerland’s latest book of the above title, begins from the well-known observation that the material innovation, production and distribution of alcohol was a critical step in early human civilizational and economic development. Fermentation was not only crucial to saving and storing water and food stuffs but also the foundation of banking and financial services. Slingerland takes this observation further by focusing upon the role of intoxicants as a social lubricant helping early human communities to generate and foment bonds of friendship, family and extended network cooperation and trust.

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The Liberal Art of Manliness: A Gentlemen’s Guide to Individual Rights in a Free Society

The Liberal Art of Manliness: A Gentlemen’s Guide to Individual Rights in a Free Society

September 1, 2023 - September 3, 2023

In cooperation with professors Audrey Redford and Anthony Carilli of the Economics Department at Hampden Sydney College, The Institute will be sponsoring a reading and discussion seminar on the evening prior and morning of the Gentlemen’s Classic football match. Director D’Amico and a group of up to 5 Wabash students will travel to Hampden Sydney, participate in a guided discussion group on a selection of readings and enjoy the football game. The readings have been curated to showcase the rich tradition of Classical Liberalism at Wabash College and is aimed to be published as a collected volume for ongoing distribution by the institute in conjunction with the American Institute for Economic Research. The table of contents for the reader is included in the Appendix of this report.

Human Freedom and Economic Development

Human Freedom and Economic Development

April 11, 2023

Center Hall 216

Adam Martin

Adam Martin is a Political Economy Research Fellow at the Free Market Institute and an associate professor of agricultural and applied economics in the Gordon W. Davis College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources at Texas Tech University. Dr. Martin's research interests focus on the intersection of philosophy, politics and economics and include Austrian economics, economic methodology, economic development and public choice.

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Immigration and the Liberal Achipelago

Immigration and the Liberal Achipelago

March 30, 2023

Baxter 101

Chandran Kukathas

Chandran Kukathas is a Malaysian-born Australian political theorist and the author of several books. Until 2019 he was Head of the Department of Government at the London School of Economics, where he held a Chair in Political Theory.

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What is Capitalism?

What is Capitalism?

March 29, 2023

Center Hall 216

Chandran Kukathas

Chandran Kukathas is a Malaysian-born Australian political theorist and the author of several books. Until 2019 he was Head of the Department of Government at the London School of Economics, where he held a Chair in Political Theory.

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The Liberal Tradition and the Problem of Poverty

The Liberal Tradition and the Problem of Poverty

March 28, 2023 - noon

Center 216

Gianna Englert

Gianna is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Southern Methodist University. Her research interests include the history of political thought, liberalism, political economy, suffrage and citizenship.

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Chasing Liberty in the Land of Fear: Drug Use for Grown Ups

Chasing Liberty in the Land of Fear: Drug Use for Grown Ups

February 21, 2023 - noon

Baxter 101, Book Signing will Follow

Carl Hart

Carl L. Hart is an American psychologist and neuroscientist, working as the Mamie Phipps Clark Professor of Psychology at Columbia University. Hart is known for his research on drug abuse and drug addiction, his advocacy for the decriminalization of recreational drugs, and his recreational use of drugs.

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Drug Prohibition and Black Markets

Drug Prohibition and Black Markets

February 13, 2023 - noon

Baxter 101

Audrey Redford

Audrey Redford is an Assistant Professor of Economics & Business in the Departments of Economics & Business at Hampden-Sydney College.

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Carceral Contact and Democratic Participation

Carceral Contact and Democratic Participation

February 10, 2023 - noon

Baxter 101

Brandon Davis

Brandon R. Davis is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and the Murphy Institute at Tulane University.

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F.A. Hayek’s Journey to Resilience

F.A. Hayek’s Journey to Resilience

Co-sponsored w/ Dr. Jim Lau '73 PPE Fund

January 26, 2023 - noon

Stefan Kolev, PhD

Kolev is a leading intellectual historian of Hayek and Ordo-liberalism amongst German speaking economists. His presentation particularly appealed to students formerly enrolled in professor Snow’s dedicated class on the thought and life of F.A. Hayek. His visit was a convenient opportunity to collaborate with Aurelian Craiutu, political science faculty at IU Bloomington and participant of the Ostrom workshop therein. Professor D’Amico also discovered and shared material from the Wabash archive reporting on Ludwig Erhard’s 1968 campus visit as Kolev is the Academic Director at the Ludwig Erhard Forum for Economy and Society in Berlin.

David Hume’s Classical Liberalism Black Liberation through the Marketplace

David Hume’s Classical Liberalism Black Liberation through the Marketplace

November 15, 2022 - noon

Rachel Ferguson, PhD

Professor Ferguson is a philosopher, the Director of the Free Enterprise Center, and Assistant Dean of the College of Business at Concordia, Chicago. Her prior research focuses on the political content of David Hume. Her most recent book argues that the broader narrative regarding the material and social progress of the American black community has underplayed the important role of commerce and entrepreneurship in elevating black lives and the black community. Her work carries a unique ability to resonate across both right and left wing politics.

Effective Protest Movements: Twitter and Black Lives Matter

Effective Protest Movements: Twitter and Black Lives Matter

October 26, 2022 - noon

Fabio Rojas, PhD

Professor Fabio Rojas teaches Sociology at Indiana University, Bloomington. His research focuses upon how social and protest movements make strategic choices in framing policy and institutional demands, resolving collective actions problems, and selecting particular language amidst marketing efforts. His past book focused upon the rise and general success of black student movements in developing black studies departments across higher education. He published multiple studies on the rise and fall of the anti-war movement amidst US involvement in the middle east. His current work focuses on how Black Lives Matter has impacted verbiage and messaging surrounding civil rights issues in online communication.

Classical Liberalism and Sociology: Freedom is Something we do Together

Classical Liberalism and Sociology: Freedom is Something we do Together

October 26, 2022 - 4pm

Fabio Rojas, PhD

Professor Fabio Rojas teaches Sociology at Indiana University, Bloomington. His research focuses upon how social and protest movements make strategic choices in framing policy and institutional demands, resolving collective actions problems, and selecting particular language amidst marketing efforts. His past book focused upon the rise and general success of black student movements in developing black studies departments across higher education. He published multiple studies on the rise and fall of the anti-war movement amidst US involvement in the middle east. His current work focuses on how Black Lives Matter has impacted verbiage and messaging surrounding civil rights issues in online communication.

The Axiom of Power: The Inevitability of Democratic Tyranny of the Minority

The Axiom of Power: The Inevitability of Democratic Tyranny of the Minority

October 7, 2022 - noon

Diana Thomas, PhD

Professor Thomas’s research explores the unintended consequences of regulation and the role that political entrepreneurs play in changing the rules that govern society. She has published in numerous academic outlets including Public Choice, Kyklos, Applied Economics, the Southern Economic Journal, and the Journal of Banking and Finance. At Creighton University she is the director of the Menard Family Institute for Economic Inquiry and teaches Microeconomics and Public Choice theory.

Internship Opportunities with the American Institute for Economic Research

Internship Opportunities with the American Institute for Economic Research

September 14, 2022 - noon

Ryan Yonk, PhD

Professor Yonk is an empirical Public Choice economist and Senior Research Fellow with the American Institute for Economic Research. His research focuses on questions of natural resource management and environmental economics. Professor Yonk delivered a thorough presentation on various internship, research and career opportunities for Wabash students to explore at AIER.

Decoding Think Tanks: How to Make an Impact Working in Washington and State Capitals

Decoding Think Tanks: How to Make an Impact Working in Washington and State Capitals

April 1, 2022

Scott Hodge, President & CEO, The Tax Foundation

Scott Hodge has been president of the Tax Foundation in Washington, D.C., since 2000, and is recognized as one of Washington’s leading experts on tax policy, the federal budget, and government spending. Scott led the development of the Taxes and Growth Dynamic Tax Modeling project and the State Business Tax Climate Index, two projects that have changed the terms of the tax debate, encouraged competition towards pro-growth tax policies, and demonstrated to policymakers and taxpayers alike the impact of the tax code on our daily lives. He has written dozens of editorials and opeds in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, USA TODAY, the New York Post and The Washington Times. And he has conducted more than 1,000 radio and television interviews–including with NBC Nightly News, CBS Evening News, CNN, Fox, Hardball with Chris Matthews, and C-SPAN. Before joining the Tax Foundation, Scott was Director of Tax and Budget Policy at Citizens for a Sound Economy. He also spent ten years at The Heritage Foundation as a fellow analyzing budget and tax policy.

The Family, Civil Society, and Spontaneous Order

The Family, Civil Society, and Spontaneous Order

March 18, 2022

Lauren Hall, Rochester Institute of Technology

Lauren Hall is associate professor of political science at Rochester Institute of Technology. She is the author of Family and the Politics of Moderation (Baylor University Press, 2014) and the co-editor of a volume on the political philosophy of French political thinker Chantal Delsol. She has written extensively on the classical liberal tradition, including articles on Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, and Montesquieu. She serves on the executive board of the interdisciplinary journal Cosmos+Taxis, which publishes on spontaneous orders in the social and political worlds. Her current research is on the politics of birth and death, and she also writes on related areas in evolutionary theory and bioethics.

How To Fix Policing In America

How To Fix Policing In America

February 23, 2022

Radley Balko, Washington Post; Cato Institute

Radley Balko is an investigative journalist and a columnist for The Washington Post, where he writes about the criminal justice system and civil liberties. He was previously a senior writer and investigative reporter at the Huffington Post, and a reporter and senior editor for Reason magazine. He is author of the acclaimed book Rise of the Warrior Cop and co-authored The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist: A True Story of Injustice in the American South. His work has been cited by the Mississippi Supreme Court, and two federal appeals courts, and twice by the U.S. Supreme Court. He also occasionally writes about the music and culture of Nashville, Tennessee, where he lives.

Trust in a Polarized Age

Trust in a Polarized Age

November 11, 2021

Kevin Vallier, Bowling Green State

Political philosopher Kevin Vallier will offer a powerful counter-narrative to the prevailing sense of hopelessness that dogs the American political landscape. In an unapologetic defense of classical liberalism that synthesizes political philosophy and empirical trust research, Vallier restores faith in our power to reduce polarization and rebuild social and political trust.

High Costs, Few Cures

High Costs, Few Cures

October 18, 2021

Art Diamond '74, U. of Nebraska

In the shadow of a continuing pandemic, we discussed public-policy questions that affect innovation in health care. How do government regulators find the right level of public oversight? As pharmaceutical researchers try to balance the need between saving lives and ensuring safety, some are rethinking older protocols and timelines for clinical trials. Dr. Diamond began with introductory remarks about Professor Benjamin Rogge, his mentor at Wabash.

What Is Bitcoin Really Worth?

What Is Bitcoin Really Worth?

September 21, 2021

Will Luther, Florida Atlantic U.

Co-sponsored with PPE & Economics

Roundtable on Afghanistan: Did the U.S. Make the Right Call?

Roundtable on Afghanistan: Did the U.S. Make the Right Call?

September 16, 2021

Justin Logan, Cato Institute
Paul D. Miller, Georgetown U., fmr. Natl. Security Council Director of Afghanistan

The Future of Criminal Justice Reform

April 21, 2021

Sarah Anderson, Director of Federal Policy, FreedomWorks
Ed Chung, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress
Vikrant Reddy, Senior Fellow, Koch Institute

Between the aggressive crime legislation of the 1990s, post-9/11 concerns about domestic terrorism, and continued minority discrimination in policing, many are troubled by the erosion of equal justice under the law as guaranteed by the Constitution. Conservatives and Libertarians, long committed to individual rights, are now collaborating with Progressives to question the status quo in our law enforcement and court systems, pointing towards dramatic possibilities for public-policy reform.

Mere Civility

March 1, 2021

Teresa Bejan, Oxford University

Is "civility" just a synonym for "politeness" or "good manners"? Oxford political theorist Teresa Bejan addressed this provocative question, based on her recent book, Mere Civility. Her argument looks back to the raucous debates and disputes of the 17th century, including the thought of philosophers Thomas Hobbes and John Locke, as well as Puritan theologian Roger Williams (and thus draws on the history of early American colonial governments). This intellectual history reminds us, too, that the oft-announced "crisis of civility" is not actually a new problem. Moving to contemporary questions, Bejan explored ways we can have controversial conversations, keep a tolerant society, and allow room for uncomfortable dissent.