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Events

Past Programs

Decoding Think Tanks: How to Make an Impact Working in Washington and State Capitals

Decoding Think Tanks: How to Make an Impact Working in Washington and State Capitals

April 1, 2022

  • Scott Hodge, President & CEO, The Tax Foundation

Scott Hodge has been president of the Tax Foundation in Washington, D.C., since 2000, and is recognized as one of Washington’s leading experts on tax policy, the federal budget, and government spending. Scott led the development of the Taxes and Growth Dynamic Tax Modeling project and the State Business Tax Climate Index, two projects that have changed the terms of the tax debate, encouraged competition towards pro-growth tax policies, and demonstrated to policymakers and taxpayers alike the impact of the tax code on our daily lives. He has written dozens of editorials and opeds in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, USA TODAY, the New York Post and The Washington Times. And he has conducted more than 1,000 radio and television interviews–including with NBC Nightly News, CBS Evening News, CNN, Fox, Hardball with Chris Matthews, and C-SPAN. Before joining the Tax Foundation, Scott was Director of Tax and Budget Policy at Citizens for a Sound Economy. He also spent ten years at The Heritage Foundation as a fellow analyzing budget and tax policy.

The Family, Civil Society, and Spontaneous Order

The Family, Civil Society, and Spontaneous Order

March 18, 2022

  • Lauren Hall, Rochester Institute of Technology

Lauren Hall is associate professor of political science at Rochester Institute of Technology. She is the author of Family and the Politics of Moderation (Baylor University Press, 2014) and the co-editor of a volume on the political philosophy of French political thinker Chantal Delsol. She has written extensively on the classical liberal tradition, including articles on Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, and Montesquieu. She serves on the executive board of the interdisciplinary journal Cosmos+Taxis, which publishes on spontaneous orders in the social and political worlds. Her current research is on the politics of birth and death, and she also writes on related areas in evolutionary theory and bioethics.

How To Fix Policing In America

How To Fix Policing In America

February 23, 2022

  • Radley Balko, Washington Post; Cato Institute

Radley Balko is an investigative journalist and a columnist for The Washington Post, where he writes about the criminal justice system and civil liberties. He was previously a senior writer and investigative reporter at the Huffington Post, and a reporter and senior editor for Reason magazine. He is author of the acclaimed book Rise of the Warrior Cop and co-authored The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist: A True Story of Injustice in the American South. His work has been cited by the Mississippi Supreme Court, and two federal appeals courts, and twice by the U.S. Supreme Court. He also occasionally writes about the music and culture of Nashville, Tennessee, where he lives.

Trust in a Polarized Age

Trust in a Polarized Age

November 11, 2021

  • Kevin Vallier, Bowling Green State

Political philosopher Kevin Vallier will offer a powerful counter-narrative to the prevailing sense of hopelessness that dogs the American political landscape. In an unapologetic defense of classical liberalism that synthesizes political philosophy and empirical trust research, Vallier restores faith in our power to reduce polarization and rebuild social and political trust.

High Costs, Few Cures

High Costs, Few Cures

October 18, 2021

  • Art Diamond '74, U. of Nebraska

In the shadow of a continuing pandemic, we discussed public-policy questions that affect innovation in health care. How do government regulators find the right level of public oversight? As pharmaceutical researchers try to balance the need between saving lives and ensuring safety, some are rethinking older protocols and timelines for clinical trials. Dr. Diamond began with introductory remarks about Professor Benjamin Rogge, his mentor at Wabash.

What Is Bitcoin Really Worth?

What Is Bitcoin Really Worth?

September 21, 2021

  • Will Luther, Florida Atlantic U.

Co-sponsored with PPE & Economics

Roundtable on Afghanistan: Did the U.S. Make the Right Call?

Roundtable on Afghanistan: Did the U.S. Make the Right Call?

September 16, 2021

  • Justin Logan, Cato Institute
  • Paul D. Miller, Georgetown U., fmr. Natl. Security Council Director of Afghanistan

The Future of Criminal Justice Reform

April 21, 2021

  • Sarah Anderson, Director of Federal Policy, FreedomWorks
  • Ed Chung, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress
  • Vikrant Reddy, Senior Fellow, Koch Institute

Between the aggressive crime legislation of the 1990s, post-9/11 concerns about domestic terrorism, and continued minority discrimination in policing, many are troubled by the erosion of equal justice under the law as guaranteed by the Constitution. Conservatives and Libertarians, long committed to individual rights, are now collaborating with Progressives to question the status quo in our law enforcement and court systems, pointing towards dramatic possibilities for public-policy reform.

Mere Civility

March 1, 2021

  • Teresa Bejan, Oxford University

Is "civility" just a synonym for "politeness" or "good manners"? Oxford political theorist Teresa Bejan addressed this provocative question, based on her recent book, Mere Civility. Her argument looks back to the raucous debates and disputes of the 17th century, including the thought of philosophers Thomas Hobbes and John Locke, as well as Puritan theologian Roger Williams (and thus draws on the history of early American colonial governments). This intellectual history reminds us, too, that the oft-announced "crisis of civility" is not actually a new problem. Moving to contemporary questions, Bejan explored ways we can have controversial conversations, keep a tolerant society, and allow room for uncomfortable dissent.