19/SP Course Faculty Days Comments/Requisites Credits Location Capacity Available Seats
PE-011-01
Advanced Fitness
D. Morel
M W
06:00AM - 07:20AM
TU TH
06:00AM - 07:20AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PE-011-02
Advanced Fitness
E. Olmstead
M W
06:00AM - 07:20AM
TU TH
06:00AM - 07:20AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PE-011-03
Advanced Fitness
J. Ramsey
M W
06:00AM - 07:20AM
TU TH
06:00AM - 07:20AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PE-011-04
Advanced Fitness
J. Franklin
M W
06:00AM - 07:20AM
TU TH
06:00AM - 07:20AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
SPA-102L-02
Elementary Spanish II Lab
Staff
TU
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CoReq SPA-102 0.00
DET 128
5
SPA-102L-04
Elementary Spanish II Lab
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq SPA-102 0.00
DET 128
5
SPA-102L-06
Elementary Spanish II Lab
Staff
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq SPA-102 0.00
DET 128
5
SPA-103L-01
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq SPA-103 0.00
DET 112
6
SPA-103L-03
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CoReq SPA-103 0.00
DET 111
6
SPA-201L-03
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq SPA-201 0.00
DET 212
7
SPA-201L-04
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CoReq SPA-201 0.00
DET 212
7
SPA-201L-05
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq SPA-201 0.00
DET 212
8
SPA-202L-01
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq SPA-202 0.00
DET 212
7
SPA-202L-02
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
TU
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CoReq SPA-202 0.00
DET 212
7
PHY-378-01
Chemical Quantum Mechanics
Schmitt P
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CHE-451 = PHY-378. PHY-210 0.50
HAY 321
16 13 
PHI-319-01
Bioethics
Hughes C
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PHI 319-01: Seminar in Ethics & Social Philosophy: Bioethics. Controversies in bioethics have become a regular part of contemporary life. We are in the midst of a biological and technological revolution that raises interesting and important ethical and philosophical questions: When does life begin? How do we define death? What life is worth living, who decides, and how? When is experimentation on humans justified? Should we allow a free market in human organs, tissues, genes? Should we use new technologies for human enhancement? What does it mean to suffer from disease and disability? What is a good relationship between a patient and caregivers? How can we provide a just distribution of health-care resources? We will consider these and other questions in a seminar discussion format. One Course Credit, Recommended Prerequisites: (i) some background in biology (e.g. BIO 101) AND (ii) one prior course in philosophy or completion of Enduring Questions. 1.00
CEN 304
18
CSC-101-01
Intro to Computer Science
McKinney C
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00
HAY 003
24 -6 
MAT-111-01
Calculus I
Z. Gates
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00
GOO 101
30 20 
ENG-202-01
Writing With Power and Grace
Aikens N
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00
CEN 300
15
MAT-277-01
Spherical Trigonometry
McKinney C
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
MAT 277-01: Spherical Trigonometry. Spherical trigonometry is an adaptation of planar trigonometry to the unique and non-Euclidean geometry of the sphere. This course will cover: the history of the subject, ranging from ancient Greek to medieval Arabic to modern European views; applications to astronomy and navigation; the relationship to Napier's work on logarithms; and computational techniques for solving problems both with and without modern electronic calculators. Students will also learn to work with slide-rules, sextants, magnetic compasses, nautical almanacs, and trigonometric tables. The course will occasionally meet at night or away from campus. Pre-requisite: C- in MAT112, MAT223 or higher placement, or permission of instructor 1.00
GOO 101
24 14 
BIO-222-01
Biology of Invertebrates
Wetzel E
TU TH
08:00AM - 11:00AM
BIO-222: Biol of Invertebrates. This is a course designed to provide students with an introduction to the diversity of invertebrate organisms through lectures, reading and discussion of primary literature, student presentations, and laboratory work. Emphasis is placed on structure, functional morphology, physiology, ecology, and evolution. A field trip during spring break has been included in the past few years. This course is offered in the spring semester of odd-numbered years. Prerequisites: BIO-112 Credit: 1 Distribution: Natural Science/Mathematics. Immersion Trip; Registration through instructor only. PreReq BIO-112 1.00
HAY 101
12
BIO-371-01
Molecular Endocrinology
Walsh H
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
BIO 371-01 = NSC 310-01: Molecular Endocrinology. This seminar course will explore the molecular and cellular mechanisms of hormone action through analysis of primary literature. Particular emphasis will be placed on the structure/function of nuclear and membrane hormone receptors, mechanisms of hormone-regulated signal transduction, and their influence on neuroendocrine pathways. This course counts as an elective toward the Biology major/minor, Biochemistry major, or Neuroscience minor. One course credit. Prerequisite: BIO 212: Cell Biology Instructor: Heidi Walsh BIO-212 1.00
HAY 001
12
BIO-221-01
Comp Anatomy & Embry
Carlson B
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
Registration through instructor only. BIO-112, BIO-221L 1.00
HAY 319
16
LAT-302-01
Advanced Latin Reading: Prose
Hartnett J
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Immersion trip; Registration through instructor only. PreReq LAT-201 or LAT-302 placement 1.00
DET 226
15
CHE-451-01
Physical Chemistry II
Schmitt P
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CHE-451 = PHY-378. CHE-351 0.50
HAY 319
16
MUS-204-01
Music and Sound Design
Renk C
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
MUS-204: Music and Sound Design. Learn how to make to your own videos, write music, record and edit sound, and convey a message in this projects based course. Students will develop their creativity through actively creating multimedia projects (including commercials, music tracks, film scores, narrative shorts, music videos and documentaries), while learning the skills to effectively edit and shape a multimodal message. Whether you are new to video and audio editing, or have experience making your own YouTube videos and short films, you can learn to use music and sound effectively and professionally for high quality digital video projects. Students will learn sound design, spatialization, digital audio theory and audio editing, basic video editing, recording techniques, sound effects, audio mixing, and the basics of writing music for video - all while gaining sophistication with combining visual and audio messages in a multimedia platform. We will also explore the roles that music and sound design play in various forms of media, communicating ideas, signifying audience, and expressing emotion. No previous experience is necessary. 1.00
FIN A133
11
PSC-314-01
Civil Liberties in War & Peace
Himsel S
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Political Science 314: Civil Liberties in War and Peace. This course will explore how well (or poorly) the Supreme Court has protected the civil liberties of those we fear most: those who challenge our most deeply held beliefs; those suspected of violent crime; and those accused of waging war against us. Should we protect speech even if it is racist, terrorist or otherwise offensive? For example, should we permit people to protest at military funerals? Should we exclude evidence that would convict a rapist because it was obtained without a Miranda warning? Should we extend to terrorists the due process of law they are seeking to destroy? For example, should suspected terrorists get jury trials? Can we try suspected terrorists if the evidence against them was extracted through torture? And can we detain terrorists without trial if we currently lack evidence but believe that they will attack us if we release them? Debating such questions will help us understand the nature and purpose of civil liberties and the role of courts in enforcing them. Prerequisite: Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors 1.00
BAX 212
20
EDU-101-01
Intro Child & Adolescent Devel
S. Barry, Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
1.00
DET 209
20
PHY-112-01
General Physics II - Sci. Maj.
Brown J
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
PHY-111 with grade of C- or better., CoReq PHY-112L 1.00
GOO 104
36 20 
THE-202-01
Intro to Scenic Design
Dreher B
M W
08:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
FIN TGRR
10
HIS-102-01
World Hist Since 1500
Warner R
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00
BAX 202
40 -1 
PSY-201-01
Research Methods & Stats I
Gunther K
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PreReq PSY-101 1.00
BAX 214
30 19 
FRE-102L-02
Elementary French II Lab.
Staff
TU
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CoReq FRE-102 0.00
DET 211
6
FRE-202L-01
French Lang: Cultural Lab.
Staff
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq FRE-202 0.00
DET 211
5
FRE-202L-02
French Lang: Cultural Lab.
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CoReq FRE-202 0.00
DET 211
5
GER-102L-03
Elementary German II Lab.
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq GER-102 0.00
DET 111
 
GER-102L-01
Elementary German II Lab.
Staff
TU
08:25AM - 09:10AM
CoReq GER-102 0.00
DET 111
 
GER-202L-03
German Lang. & Culture Lab.
Staff
TH
08:45AM - 09:35AM
CoReq GER-202 0.00
DET 112
 
SPA-102-01
Elementary Spanish II
Rogers D
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq SPA-101 or SPA-102 placement., CoReq SPA-102L 1.00
DET 212
15
SPA-201-01
Intermediate Spanish
Y. Castillo Botello
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq SPA-102, 103 or 201 placement, CoReq SPA-201L 1.00
DET 220
18
SPA-103-01
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Welch M
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
SPA 103 Placement, CoReq SPA-103L 1.00
DET 111
18
SPA-202-01
Span.Lang. & Hispanic Cultures
Hardy J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq SPA-201 or 202 placement, CoReq SPA-202L 1.00
DET 211
18 10 
MLL-102-01
Elementary Modern Languages II
Li Y
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
TBA TBA
3
PSY-101-01
Introduction to Psychology
Horton R
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
BAX 101
50
HIS-252-01
Peoples & Nations of Lat.Amer.
Warner R
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
HIS-252 = HSP-252 1.00
BAX 201
25 12 
PSY-102-01
Human Sexual Behavior
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PSY-102 = GEN-102 0.50
HAY 002
40 24 
PHY-314-01
Electromagnetic Theory
J. Ross
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PHY-112 and MAT-224, 225 1.00
GOO 006
 
PHY-210-01
Intro Quantum Theory & Apps
N. Tompkins
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PHY-209 with grade of C- or better and MAT-223., CoReq PHY-210L 1.00
GOO 305
 
PSC-141-01
Intro to Intn'l Relations
Wells M
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
BAX 202
35
ECO-262-01
Financial Markets and Inst.
Saha S
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
ECO-101 1.00
BAX 311
30
ECO-291-01
Intermediate Micro
Burnette J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq ECO-101 with a C- or better and MAT-110 or 111 with a C- or better. 1.00
BAX 114
25
ECO-292-01
Intermediate Macro
Mikek P
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq ECO-101 with a C- or better and MAT-110 or 111 with a C- or better. 1.00
BAX 214
25
GEN-102-01
Human Sexual Behavior
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
GEN-102 = PSY-102-01 0.50
HAY 002
40 29 
CHE-241-01
Inorganic Chemistry
Porter L, Schmitt P
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Take CHE-111., Take CHE-241L. 1.00
HAY 104
48 14 
CHE-321-01
Organic Chemistry II
Wysocki L
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
CHE-221, CoReq CHE-321L 1.00
HAY 319
28
BLS-270-01
African American Environ Lit
M. Lambert
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
BLS-270 = ENG-160: African-American Environmental Literature. SEE ENG-160 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
CEN 215
20 18 
ENG-310-01
Autobiography, Biography & Mem
Lamberton J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
English 310: Studies in Literary Genres: Autobiography, Biography and Memoir. What is the purpose of a given life story, and what are the implications of a writer's choices to omit or to include certain details? When do authors' choices cross the line between truth and deception, or tend too much toward hagiography or slander? This course will examine literary theories of "life writing"-that is, how authors choose to craft an autobiography, biography, or memoir. Our readings will sample widely from the genres of life writing, by or about subjects including Benjamin Franklin, Harriet Jacobs, Henry James, Alison Bechdel, and God. 1 credit from ENG at Wabash. 1.00
CEN 305
15
ENG-160-01
African American Environ Lit
M. Lambert
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
ENG-160: African-American Environmental Literature. While environmental literature is often associated with white authors like Henry David Thoreau and John Muir, this course builds upon a growing body of scholarship in Black Studies and the Environmental Humanities that sees environmental concerns as important to the experiences and culture of African Americans. In the course, we will read authors like Phillis Wheatley, W. E. B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, Percival Everett, and Octavia Butler to explore the unique contributions black authors have made to the development of environmental consciousness in the U.S., including their recognition of ways that social and environmental issues are often intertwined for African Americans and other minorities. We will also identify aspects of environmental thought in the work of black musicians, filmmakers, scientists, and activists. 1.00
CEN 215
30 17 
HSP-252-01
Peoples & Nations of Lat.Amer.
Warner R
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
HSP 252 = HIS-252 1.00
BAX 201
25 22 
MAT-112-01
Calculus II
Cole J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq MAT-110, 111 with a grade of C- or better or 112 placement 1.00
HAY 003
24 15 
CSC-211-01
Intro Data Structures
Turner W
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prereq CSC-111 with a grade of C- or better. 1.00
GOO 101
24 15 
RHE-101-01
Public Speaking
Geraths C
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
FIN FA206
20
REL-104-01
Religions of China and Japan
Blix D
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
CEN 216
50 -2 
REL-273-01
Augustine: Philosop & Theology
Nelson D
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
REL 273-01-Augustine: Philosophy and Theology. Augustine of Hippo (354-430) is the most influential figure in the history of Christianity in the last sixteen hundred years. His legacy is (usually proudly) claimed by Protestant and Roman Catholics alike. This course will read his masterpiece Confessions, as well as selections of his philosophical writings. He is a major figure in the development of Platonism, so the class will also learn about Plato's philosophy as it was useful to Christianity. Course offered first half of the semester.½ course credit. No prerequisites 0.50
CEN 300
20
REL-273-02
Thomas Aquinas: Philos & Theol
Nelson D
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
REL 273-02 -Thomas Aquinas: Philosophy and Theology. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) is the most important medieval theologian and philosopher. His work integrated classical Christian beliefs with the newest philosophy and science available at the time: Aristotle's recently re-discovered thought. This seminar will read excerpts from Thomas' Summa Theologicarelated to the nature and existence of God, evil, human action, sacraments and grace. Course offered second half of the semester. ½ course credit. No prerequisites. 0.50
CEN 300
20
GER-102L-02
Elementary German II Lab.
Staff
TU
09:20AM - 10:05AM
CoReq GER-102 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MLL-121-01
Language Variation & Change
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MLL-121 = ENG-121 = HUM-121 PreReq ENG-122 HUM-122 or MLL-122. 0.50
BAX 202
30 24 
MLL-122-01
Modern Linguistics
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MLL-122 = ENG-122 = HUM-122 0.50
BAX 202
30 25 
FRE-313-01
Displacements
Quandt K
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FRE-313: Displacements. The philosopher Pascal cautioned against moving out of one's private sphere, even out of one's room, since the potential for petty distractions or moral vagrancy is too great. But during the Enlightenment, and then through the Romantic period to our own times, travel to far locales, interest in other cultures, and the phenomena of exile and migration have enthralled (or vexed) the imagination of artists and writers. This course will consider the theme of displacement in a multitude of its forms. What happens when we are displaced, either physically or imaginatively? Do we become a different self, with a new identity? Do we project ourselves onto other cultures? Do we become alienated or isolated? Is displacement a dystopia? Or, rather, can displacement condition us to become more tolerant, more resilient, or more inspired? These are some of the questions we will ask while exploring French literary works from all periods and a variety of genres. Works considered will address the confrontation between Europeans and the New World; political and existential exile; the phenomenon of travel, within Europe, across the Atlantic, or even into space; imagination as a means of escapism; Symbolist poetry as an expression of a radical (displaced) language; migration; and displacements caused by war. Authors include Joachim Du Bellay, Françoise de Graffigny, Chateaubriand, Victor Hugo, Jules Verne, Flaubert, Rimbaud, Marguerite Duras, and J.M.G. Le Clézio. Complete FRE-301 and FRE-302 Minimum grade C- 1.00
DET 128
10
BLS-300-03
Global Rhetorics
Geraths C
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
RHE 370-01= MAS360= BLS 300-03= ASI 312: Global Rhetorics. SEE RHE-370-01 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
HAY 002
20 20 
THE-208-01
Games and Interactive Media
Abbott M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
LIB LGL
15
THE-303-01
New York City Stage & Screen
Cherry J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
THE-303: NEW YORK CITY ON STAGE AND SCREEN. From Lincoln Center to the Astor Place Opera House, from the Disney mega-musicals of Broadway to edgy one-person shows in the East Village, New York City has shaped American performance culture since the founding of the Republic. The objective of this course is to examine and experience the vast array of performance offerings of the City, a rich and perpetually-changing tapestry of theater, film, dance, opera, and performance art. We will also reflect on the ways in which New York City itself exists as a site of performance, both literally and symbolically. In this course, the student will study the history of New York performance, the distinctive theater and film industries and cultures of New York, and "the current season." We will also learn about the world of New York theatrical criticism, and become critics ourselves. Through research papers, short critical essays, presentations, and an immersion trip, students will engage with New York City as a center of national and global performance culture. Immersion trip; Registration through instructor only. 1.00
FIN TGRR
15
PSY-202-01
Research Methods & Stats II
Bost P
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PreReq PSY-201 1.00
BAX 214
30 22 
HIS-300-01
World Medical History
Rhoades M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HIS-300-01: World Medical History. In this course students will read about developments in medical history from Ancient Greece to the present. Primarily a readings course in medical history, students will begin by considering early interpretations of the human body and illness. Students will also read about the four humors (the fluids thought to control or create all dis-ease in the body), early modern "quackery" (treatments thought to cure illness, not based in a solid understanding of the body), outbreaks of diseases such as syphilis and Ebola, and the development of medical science and research. There is no prerequisite for the course. However, students should be ready for a Wabash work load that will include several short papers and one longer paper at the end of the semester. There will be no in-class exams. 1.00
BAX 201
15 12 
CHE-331-01
Adv Analytical Chem
Schmitt P
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
CHE-211 or 241., CoReq CHE-331L 1.00
HAY 001
18
PSC-210-01
The Courts and Democracy
Himsel S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PSC-210-01 = HIS-240-02: The Courts and Democracy. After twice electing an African American President, do we no longer need laws protecting minority voters? Is requiring photo id or eliminating expanded voter hours intended to discriminate against minority and poor voters? Or are they legitimate means to prevent voter fraud? May one party draw electoral districts to disadvantage the other party? May we limit how much corporations and wealthy individuals contribute to campaigns? Did the Supreme Court have the authority to decide the 2000 presidential election? This course will focus on who should answer these types of questions. Are unelected judges qualified to supervise elections? Can we trust those who must win elections to supervise them fairly? This course will explore that debate and examine how it has helped shape the last fifty years of American history. 1.00
BAX 212
20
PSC-310-01
The Politics of Sports
T. Masthay
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
The Politics of Sport. This course will address the intersection between sports, political institutions, and social movements. The political, social, and economic impact of professional and amateur sports are substantial in both positive and negative ways. Topics covered will include the public financing of stadium construction, the impact that hosting mega-events such as the Olympics has on human rights, the rights of professional athletes as workers, the fight for gender equality in sports, the role governments play in ensuring athletic competition is fair, and how devotion to sports franchises serve as an identity. By the end of the semester, discussions about all of these real world implications which extend beyond the actual results of sporting events should convince you that it is not accurate to reduce athletic competition to being "just a game" and equip you with the evidence to demonstrate why that's the case. 1.00
CEN 305
18 -3 
MUS-202-01
Instruments & Culture
Makubuya J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MUS-202 = BLS-270-03 = MAS-212 1.00
FIN M120
15
PHY-110-01
Fluids and Fields
J. Ross
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
CoReq PHY-110L. 1.00
GOO 104
32
EDU-101-02
Intro Child & Adolescent Devel
S. Barry, Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
DET 209
22
MAS-275-01
Danc on Bridg: Div/Rel/Lib Art
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MAS-275 = REL-275 SEE REL-275 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
CEN 304
20 19 
MAS-360-01
Global Rhetoric
Geraths C
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MAS-360 = RHE-370-01 = BLS-300-03 = ASI-312 SEE RHE-370-01 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
HAY 002
20 19 
REL-275-01
Danc on Bridg: Div/Rel/Lib Art
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
REL-275 = MAS-275: Topics in Religion and Philosophy: "Dancing on the Bridge": Diversity, Religion, and the Liberal Arts. How, in a global-digital world, do we bridge the gap between people of widely divergent backgrounds? Between diverse religions? Cultures? Races? Ethnicities? Worldviews? Should we aim for tolerance? Acceptance? Understanding? Should we learn from them, in the manner of a humanist? Should we learn about them, in the manner of a scientist or scholar? Should we try to deconstruct hidden prejudices? How? Why? These are basic liberal-arts questions. In this course, we will build a model for negotiating diversity based on "play" and the "work of art." We will use tools drawn from "hermeneutics," or the art and theory of interpretation. Case studies will be drawn from religion, art, music, philosophy, law, history, and anthropology. Texts will include Hans-Georg Gadamer's Truth and Method, as well as selections from Kant, Voltaire, Geertz, Z.Z. Packer, Appiah, Turkle, and others. 1 course credit. Prerequisite: none. 1.00
CEN 304
20
REL-280-01
Sects and Cults in America
Baer J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Rel-280-01: Topics in American Religion: Sects and Cults in America. This course investigates the beliefs and practices of new, marginal, and dissenting American religious groups, which are often labeled "sects" or "cults." We will draw upon the sociology of religion to understand these terms and new religious movements and reformist groups in general. Primarily, we will focus on the history, theology, and practices of groups such as Mormons, Pentecostals, Branch Davidians, the Peoples Temple, and Scientology. One course credit. No prerequisites. 1.00
CEN 300
20 10 
PHI-218-01
Philosophy of Commerce
Gower J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
DET 109
28
ART-225-01
Experimental Animation
Mohl D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ART 225-01: Topics in Studio: Experimental Animation. This survey course will provide students with the basic knowledge and tools needed to create their own animations using Abode After Effects. Techniques covered may include: Animating layers, working with masks, distorting objects with the Puppet Tools, using the Roto Brush Tool, color correction and working with the 3D Camera Tracker. Sound design, composition and other basic image making principles will be explored. We will also examine the aesthetic nature of experimental film and specifically how it can be applied to animation. There will be a studio art component during the second half of the semester during which each student will create their own original short experimental animation. Prerequisite: None 1.00
FIN A113
12 -1 
RHE-270-01
Rhet Delibratve Innov Scotland
Drury S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
RHE 270-01 - RHETORICS OF DELIBERATIVE INNOVATION IN SCOTLAND. This course will investigate the rhetorical process of dialogue, deliberation, and community engagement in Scotland and the United Kingdom. Students will examine rhetorical theories relating to deliberative democracy, and then use those to analyze and understand the Scottish context. Scotland is currently an exciting site for many types of democratic innovation, including citizens' juries, local community engagement efforts, participatory budgeting, and expanded participation through the devolution of powers to the Scottish National Parliament. This trip will have an immersion trip over spring break, and students will travel to Scotland and meet with government officials, university faculty and students involved with deliberative democracy, neighborhood organizations, and come face-to-face with the contours of Scottish democracy. Additionally, students will learn about the theories and practices of public deliberation, including framing public issues and facilitation. On returning from Scotland, students will compare and contrast the rhetorics of U.S. local, state, and national contexts for deliberative innovation. This course qualifies as a Literature & Fine Arts credit. One course credit. Enrollment by instructor approval only. Prerequisite: None **This course is open to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors only. Students need to apply for this course (refer to all-student email or contact Dr. Sara Drury, drurys@wabash.edu). Applications are due October 31, 2018. 1.00
FIN S206
10 -2 
RHE-370-01
Global Rhetorics
Geraths C
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
RHE 370 = MAS 360 = BLS 300-03 = ASI 312: Global Rhetorics. We live and communicate in a global society. With the advent of modern technologies and the availability of diverse media, our contemporary moment is saturated by a plurality of rhetorics from around the world. We lament the plight of refugees fleeing from war and authoritarian governments (e.g., Syria; North Korea). We grapple with the global nature of problems such as climate change and how such issues will impact different regions inequitably (e.g., Micronesia; The Maldives). We take stock of the ramifications of historical systems of colonial, orientalist, and imperialist oppression (e.g., Apartheid in South Africa; ownership and exhibition of cultural artifacts such as the Rosetta Stone in the United Kingdom). And we watch as citizens organize in protest against their governments, often spurred by the power of social media (e.g., the Arab Spring; activism within the U.S./Mexico/Central American borderlands). This course will focus on these and other case studies from around the world with the aim of exploring the following fundamental question: "what is the role of rhetoric within a global world?" In a seminar style class, we will begin by conceptualizing and critiquing the Western origins of rhetoric in ancient Greece and Rome and working through prominent comparative approaches to this European rhetorical tradition from Africa, Asia, and the indigenous peoples of the Americas and Australia. We will then dwell with a variety of global case studies, including those above, to chart the ways that rhetoric is theorized and practiced divergently around the world today. To supplement these case studies, this course will feature a series of guest lectures/discussions with scholars exploring the practice of rhetoric outside of the United States (including in places such as Sweden, China, and Israel). This course fulfills the Literature/Fine Arts distribution requirement. 1 credit. Prerequisites: None Take FRT-101. 1.00
HAY 002
20
PHI-272-01
Philosophy of Science
Carlson M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
GOO 305
18
MAT-224-01
Elem Differential Equations
Poffald E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Prereq MAT-112 with a minimum grade of C- and 223. 1.00
GOO 101
24
ENG-180-02
Comics and Graphic Novels
Mong D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
English 180-02 = ART-210: Comics and Graphic Novels. Dismissed once as kids fare or shrugged off as sub-literate-"in the hierarchy of applied arts," Art Spiegelman once wrote, comic books surpass only "tattoo art and sign painting"-comics today are enjoying their Renaissance. In 2015, comics and graphic novel sales topped $1 billon, a 20-year high. Award-winning fiction writers now moonlight for Marvel (Roxanne Gay, Ta-Nehisi Coates) or pen essays on Peanuts (Jonathan Franzen). Superheroes dominate the big screen. In this class, we'll explore a deceptively simple medium as it develops-like a teen bit by a radioactive spider-a whole host of special abilities. We'll use Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics, a critical text that is itself a comic, to become smart readers of sequential art. We'll use Hillary Chute's new book, Why Comics? From Underground to Everywhere, to ask why comics so frequently explore sex, the suburbs, disaster, and superheroes. Readings might include Moore and Gibbons's The Watchmen, Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, the Hernandez Brothers' Love and Rockets, Spiegelman's Maus, and/or works by Lynda Barry, Daniel Clowes, Phoebe Gloeckner, Harvey Pekar, R. Crumb, and Chris Ware. The course is open to all students; underclassmen are encouraged to enroll. There will be capes and tights. 1.00
CEN 215
30 10 
BLS-270-03
Instruments and Culture
Makubuya J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
BLS-270-03 = MUS-202 = MAS-212: Instruments and Culture. 1.00
FIN M120
15 15 
ENG-260-01
Intro to Black Studies
Lake T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ENG-260 = BLS-20: Intro to Black Studies 1.00
MXI 214
20 17 
BLS-201-01
Introduction to Black Studies
Lake T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
BLS-201 = ENG-260 1.00
MXI 214
20
CLA-211-01
The Golden Ass: Apuleius & Anc
Kubiak D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
CLA-211 = ENG 109 The Golden Ass: Apuleius and the Ancient Novel. This course is dedicated to our only complete Latin novel, a comic and sometimes quite bawdy tale originally entitled Metamorphoses, but more commonly known by the name St. Augustine uses for it, The Golden Ass. Written by Lucius Apuleius, a Neo-Platonic philosopher who was born in North Africa under Roman rule, the story recounts the experiences of a hapless man, who while experimenting with magic accidentally turns himself into a donkey. The novel traces the wild adventures of the narrator-who, like the author, is named Lucius-as he experiences the Roman Empire from a literally asinine perspective. Ultimately, things turn serious, as Lucius regains human form through initiation into the cult of the Egyptian goddess Isis. The Golden Ass thus grants opportunities for reading an entertaining work of literature, but also for learning and thinking about many different realms of Roman life (religion, slavery, spectacle, etc.) as well as for thinking about genre and influence. Like epic, history, tragedy and comedy, the novel was also an ancient invention, and scholars are now renewing study on Apuleius' manipulation of genres. Moreover, embedded within The Golden Ass is a long excursus containing one of the most famous tales of antiquity, the erotic story of Cupid and Psyche, which was widely known and influential from the Renaissance to the 19th century. We can trace its influence on authors like Shakespeare, Cervantes, and Flaubert. No background in Classics is necessary, merely a willingness to dive into this curious book and the fascinating culture that produced it. 1.00
DET 220
 
BIO-371-02
Plants and Climate Change
Ingram A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
BIO 371-02: Plants and Climate Change. While it is clear that human activities (e.g., burning fossil fuels, agriculture) have already or will soon fundamentally alter many essential biogeochemical processes on Earth, many questions remain about how plants, a crucial piece in the puzzle, will respond to climate change. This course will provide students with a crash course in the basics of climate science and will use that foundation to explore climate change's predicted effects on plants and plants' effects on climate in the coming decades and centuries. We will use discussions of primary literature to address topics including the response of photosynthesis to increased CO2 concentrations, warmer temperatures, and changing water availability; the effects of land use changes on the carbon cycle; plant greenhouse gas emissions; responses of non-native plants to climate change; and likely implications for biodiversity, food security, and human health. Prerequisite: BIO 112 BIO-212 1.00
HAY 321
12
CHE-106-01
Survey of Biochemistry
Taylor A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
CoReq CHE-106L 1.00
HAY 104
40 -3 
LAT-102L-01
Beginning Latin Lab II
Hartnett J
TU
09:45AM - 10:35AM
CoReq LAT-102 0.00
DET 111
 
GER-401-01
Senior Seminar in German
Redding G
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
DET 226
 
SPA-312-01
Futbol Soccer: Lang, Lit, Cult
Monsalve M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Studies in Hispanic Culture - Fútbol Soccer: Language, Literature and Culture. This course will explore football soccer in Latin America and Spain as a referent of culture and identity. "Fútbol" is a global phenomenon and an authentic cultural expression; it is the common language spoken by men and women regardless of their age, status, background or religion but it has also been a powerful tool during military dictatorships, presidential campaigns and international relations. The class will focus on the analysis of soccer through literature, cinema, and newspapers. We will study the work by some of the most influential authors of the Spanish speaking world such as Juan Villoro, Osvaldo Soriano, Javier Marías, Roberto Fontanarrosa, Eduardo Galeano, Roberto Bolaño y Eduardo Sacheri, among others. Taught in Spanish. PreReq SPA-301 and 302 1.00
DET 212
18 13 
GER-202L-04
German Lang. & Culture Lab.
Staff
TH
09:45AM - 10:35AM
CoReq GER-202 0.00
TBA TBA
 
MAS-212-01
Instruments and Culture
Makubuya J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MAS-212 = MUS-202 = BLS-270-03: Instruments and Culture. 1.00
FIN M120
15 15 
HIS-240-02
The Courts and Democracy
Himsel S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HIS-240-02 = PSC-210 SEE PSC-210 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
BAX 212
20 17 
HUM-121-01
Language Variation and Change
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HUM-121 = MLL-121 = ENG-121 PreReq ENG-122 or HUM-122 or MLL-122 0.50
BAX 202
30 27 
ENG-121-01
Language Variation & Change
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ENG-121 = MLL-121 = HUM-121 PreReq ENG-122 or HUM-122 or MLL-122 0.50
BAX 202
30 13 
ENG-122-01
Modern Linguistics
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ENG-122 = MLL-122 = HUM-122 0.50
BAX 202
30
HUM-122-01
Modern Linguistics
Hardy J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
HUM-122 = MLL-122 = ENG-122 0.50
BAX 202
30 26 
ENG-109-01
The Golden Ass: Apuleius & Anc
Kubiak D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ENG-109 = CLA-211: The Golden Ass: Apuleius and the Ancient Novel. SEE CLA-211 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
DET 220
 
ASI-312-01
Global Rhetorics
Geraths C
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ASI-312 = RHE-370-01 = MAS-360 = BLS-300-03: Global Rhetorics. SEE RHE-370-01 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
HAY 002
20 20 
ART-210-01
Topics Art History
Mong D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ART-210 = ENG-180-02: Comics and Graphic Novels. 1.00
CEN 215
30 21 
FDM-208-01
Games and Interactive Media
Abbott M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
FDM-208 = THE-208. 1.00
LIB LGL
1
SPA-321-01
Spanish Conversatn & Compositn
Gomez G
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
This course is specifically aimed at heritage learners, i. e., native and near-¬native speakers of Spanish. It focuses on the continued development of the student's command of the Spanish language and his understanding of the cultures of the Spanish¬ speaking world, with an emphasis on speaking and writing. Students gain competence in writing and speaking and read selections of both Spanish and Spanish American fiction and nonfiction. Films and a variety of videos will also be screened. This course is offered every spring. By Placement only 1.00
DET 128
18
PHI-109-01F
Perspectives on Philosophy
Carlson M
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
FRESHMAN ONLY SECTION. See PHI-109-01 for course description. 1.00
LIB LGL
6
MAS-214-01
Global Music Perspectives
Makubuya J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
MAS-214 = MUS-224 = BLS-270-02: Global Music Perspectives. MUS-102 1.00
FIN M140
10 10 
MLL-287-01
Intermediate Japanese
Li Y
TU TH
10:00AM - 11:00AM
0.50-1.00
DET 211
2
CHE-101-01
Survey of Chemistry
Wysocki L, Teitgen A
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
CoReq CHE-101L 1.00
HAY 319
40 -1 
ECO-101-01
Princ of Economics
E. Dunaway
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
BAX 311
30
BIO-212-01
Cell Biology
Walsh H, Sorensen-Kamakian E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
BIO-211 or 213, BIO-212L 1.00
HAY 003
40 23 
ENG-411-01
Bus & Tech Writing
Herzog T
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Take FRC. Must be a junior or a senior. 1.00
CEN 304
16
BLS-270-02
Global Music Perspectives
Makubuya J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
BLS-270-02 = MUS-224 = MAS-214: Global Music Perspectives. 1.00
FIN M140
10 10 
MAT-331-01
Abstract Algebra I
Z. Gates
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Prereq MAT-223 with a mimimum grade of C-. 1.00
HAY 002
24
MAT-344-01
Complex Analysis
Poffald E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
MAT-223 1.00
GOO 305
18 14 
BIO-112-01
General Biology II
Burton P, Ingram A
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
BIO-111, BIO-112L 1.00
HAY 104
80 36 
ENG-110-01
Intro. to Creative Writing
Marshall N
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
CEN 305
20
MAT-112-02
Calculus II
Turner W
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PreReq MAT-110, 111 with a grade of C- or better or 112 placement 1.00
GOO 101
24 11 
RHE-101-02
Public Speaking
Drury J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
FIN FA206
20
PHI-109-01
Videogames and Philosophy
Carlson M
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PHI-109-01: Perspectives on Philosophy: Videogames and Philosophy. This course will serve as an introduction to philosophy by means of thinking about videogames. On the one hand, this means that thinking about videogames can help us to shed light on perennial philosophical questions. For example: Who are we? Do we have a choice in this matter? What is freedom, and what does it mean to say that we are free to act as we choose? What is real, and how do we know about it? On the other hand, work in philosophy can help us to consider important questions concerning videogames. For instance: What distinguishes videogames from other kinds of artworks? For that matter, does it make sense to think of videogames as works of art? Is it immoral to play videogames with violent or misogynist content? Can playing videogames be an important part of a good life? To tackle these questions, we will consider some important works of classical and contemporary philosophers, and we will play a number of recent games from a philosophically engaged perspective. One Course Credit, No Prerequisites 1.00
LIB LGL
12
REL-162-01
His & Lit of the New Testament
Phillips G
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
REL 162 = CLA 162 1.00
CEN 216
50 19 
MAS-215-01
Dramaturgy
H. Vogel
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
MAS-215 = THE-209 SEE THE-209 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
FIN TGRR
16 15 
HIS-102-02
World Hist Since 1500
Morillo S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
BAX 202
35
PSC-336-01
American Political Thought
McCrary L
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PreReq PSC-131 or HIS-241 or 242 1.00
BAX 201
20 18 
PHY-220-01
Electronics
N. Tompkins
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PreReq PHY-112 with grade of C- or better, CoReq PHY-220L 1.00
GOO 307
 
MUS-224-01
Global Pers. Music Cul & Id
Makubuya J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
MUS-224 = BLS-270-02 = MAS-214 1.00
FIN M140
10
PSC-121-01
Intro to Comparative Politics
Hollander E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
DET 109
35
GEN-101-01
Intro to Gender Studies
Trott A
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
CEN 215
30
MUS-101-01
Music in Society: A History
Spencer R
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
BAX 212
20
ECO-377-01
Investments
Saha S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
ECO 377: Investments The goal of this course is to explore the theory and the empirical evidence for investment management. The major topics are elements of investments, securities markets, portfolio theory, debt securities, derivatives market and investment planning. It will provide the basic knowledge about the current financial markets, valuation of investment tools and different investment strategies. This course will help to develop the quantitative analytical skill that can be applied to a broad range of investment decisions and thus will require use of Excel and other statistical packages. After completing the course, students will be able to explain and apply the key concepts and techniques in Investments to their daily lives and be able to understand how they work. The students who want to develop their decision-making abilities in investments or are planning to start a career as investment professionals will find this course useful. The subject matter of this course is intended to complement two other courses (Money and Banking and/or Corporate Finance) through application of the concepts to real world scenarios. ECO-101, 253, and 291 or 292, and 361 or 362 1.00
BAX 214
25
CLA-162-01
New Testament
Phillips G
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
CLA 162 = REL 162 1.00
CEN 216
50 32 
PSY-101-02
Introduction to Psychology
Olofson E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
BAX 114
40
THE-209-01
Dramaturgy
H. Vogel
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
THE-209 = MAS-215: DRAMATURGY. Dramaturgy is the understanding, analysis, and support of the structure and core movement in a script which makes it function to optimum effect in production. In this class, we will delve into The Pitmen Painters and The African Company Presents Richard III, Theater's spring productions. We begin with basic analysis-action, character, structure, theme, motif-and then investigate historical, socio-political, and theoretical contexts. In consultation with the directors and actors, focus will be given to applying analysis and research to performance. Pedagogical tools will include discussion, in-class projects, written assignments, and public displays of dramaturgical product. 1.00
FIN TGRR
16 14 
HIS-243-01
U.S. and the World Since 1945
Thomas S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
DET 226
25 15 
CHI-102-01
Elementary Chinese II
Li Y
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PreReq CHI-101 or CHI-102 placement., CoReq CHI-102L. 1.00
DET 211
16
CHI-202-01
Intermediate Chinese II
Healey C
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PreReq CHI-201 or CHI-202 placement., CoReq CHI-202L. 1.00
DET 112
5
GER-102-01
Elementary German II
A. Smith
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
GER-101 or GER-102 placement, GER-102L 1.00
DET 111
 
GER-202-01
German Language & Culture
Redding G
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
GER-201 or GER-202 placement., CoReq GER-202L 1.00
DET 212
 
GER-202L-01
German Lang. & Culture Lab.
Staff
TU
10:15AM - 11:00AM
CoReq GER-202 0.00
TBA TBA
 
GER-102L-04
Elementary German II Lab.
Staff
W
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CoReq GER-102 0.00
DET 111
 
PSY-496-02
Senior Project
Gunther K
W
11:00AM - 11:30AM
PSY-495 0.50
BAX OFF
 
PSY-223-01
Abnormal Psychology
Bost P
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PSY-101 1.00
BAX 311
25 11 
PSY-233-01
Behavioral Neuroscience
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
Prereq: PSY-204, NSC-204, BIO-101, or BIO-111. 1.00
BAX 202
25 16 
MUS-301-01
Music Theory II
Renk C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
MUS-201, Take MUS-301L 1.00
FIN OFF
15 13 
PSC-297-01
Research/Stats-Political Sci
Hollander E
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
BAX 214
17 11 
PHY-220L-01
Electronics Lab
N. Tompkins
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CoReq PHY-220 0.00
GOO 307
 
THE-203-01S
Costume Design
Bear A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
SENIORS ONLY SECTION. 1.00
FIN TGRR
4
THE-203-01
Costume Design
Bear A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
FIN TGRR
8
REL-298-01
Sociology of Religion
Baer J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
REL-298-01 = SOC-298-01: 298 Sociology of Religion. This seminar focuses on the history and methods of sociology as applied to the study of religion. In exploring the interaction between religion and society, the course will have two main components: first, we will examine major sociological theories of religion; and second, we will apply them to an examination of religion among teenagers and emerging adults in the United States today. One course credit. No prerequisites. 1.00
CEN 304
20
REL-370-01
Contemporary Theology
Nelson D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PreReq REL-171, 172, 173, 270, or PHI-242 1.00
CEN 215
20 17 
RHE-320-01
Classical Rhetoric
Geraths C
F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
M W
11:00AM - 11:50AM
RHE 320 = CLA 220 1.00
GOO 104
HAY 001
20 -2 
SOC-298-01
Sociology of Religion
Baer J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
REL-298-01 = SOC-298-01: Sociology of Religion. This seminar focuses on the history and methods of sociology as applied to the study of religion. In exploring the interaction between religion and society, the course will have two main components: first, we will examine major sociological theories of religion; and second, we will apply them to an examination of religion among teenagers and emerging adults in the United States today. One course credit. No prerequisites. 1.00
CEN 304
20 14 
BIO-101-01
Human Biology
Sorensen-Kamakian E, Wetzel E, Carlson B
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CoReq BIO-101L 1.00
HAY 104
72
CLA-220-01
Classical Rhetoric
Geraths C
F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
M W
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CLA 220 = RHE 320 1.00
GOO 104
HAY 001
20 19 
ECO-234-01
Environmental Economics
Byun C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
ECO 234: Environmental Economics* This course uses economic principles to analyze the relationship between humans and the environment. The central theme is that there are competing demands for the limited supply of natural resources, such as clean air, water, and the waste assimilation capacity of the land. The application of economic theory can help us understand how to best allocate these scarce resources between various wants and needs of society. We will study how these natural resources are distributed via both market and command and control systems, analyze the potential problems with these allocations, and understand how to reallocate resources to achieve more socially desirable outcomes. We will cover issues such as market efficiency, externalities, cost-benefit analysis, the valuation of environmental resources, and alternative policy instruments for environmental use and preservation. Immersion trip; Registration through the instructor only. ECO-101 1.00
BAX 114
 
CHE-361-01
Biochemistry
Novak W
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CHE-211, 241, or 321 or Permission of Instructor., CoReq CHE-361L 1.00
HAY 003
32
FRC-101-01
Enduring Questions
Cherry J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
FIN M140
16
FRC-101-02
Enduring Questions
Healey C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
DET 112
16
FRC-101-03
Enduring Questions
Teitgen A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
DET 212
16
FRC-101-04
Enduring Questions
Hughes C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
GOO 305
16
FRC-101-05
Enduring Questions
Olofson E
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
BAX 301
16
FRC-101-06
Enduring Questions
Himsel S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
BAX 201
16
FRC-101-07
Enduring Questions
M. Lambert
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
CEN 300
16
FRC-101-08
Enduring Questions
Burton P
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
HAY 321
16
FRC-101-09
Enduring Questions
Wells M
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
DET 128
16
FRC-101-10
Enduring Questions
Marshall N
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
CEN 305
16
FRC-101-11
Enduring Questions
Drury J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
FIN FA206
16
FRC-101-12
Enduring Questions
Gomez G
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
DET 220
16
FRC-101-13
Enduring Questions
Bost A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
HAY 002
16
FRC-101-14
Enduring Questions
Phillips G
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
MXI 214
16
FRC-101-15
Enduring Questions
Ansaldi K
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
GOO 006
16
FRC-101-16
Enduring Questions
Royalty B
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
DET 211
16
FRC-101-17
Enduring Questions
Mikek P
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
BAX 212
 
FRC-101-18
Enduring Questions
Warner R
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
MXI 213
 
PSC-230-04
Soverignty, Territory, Borders
Gower J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PSC-230-04 = PHI-219: Topics in Ethics & Social Philosophy: Sovereignty, Territory, Borders. SEE PHI-219 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
CEN 305
18 12 
HUM-296-01
Parables Jewish & Christ Trad
Phillips G
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HUM-296 = REL-296 1.00
CEN 304
20 20 
ENG-360-01
Magical Realism in African Lit
Pouille A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ENG-360 = FRE-377 = BLS-300-02: Magical Realism in African Literature. SEE FRE-377 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1 credit from ENG at Wabash. 1.00
DET 226
15 12 
HIS-212-01
Ancient Rome
Hartnett J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
CLA-106 = HIS-212 1.00
HAY 319
50 38 
SPA-102-02
Elementary Spanish II
Rogers D
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PreReq SPA-101 or SPA-102 placement., CoReq SPA-102L 1.00
DET 128
15
SPA-201-02
Intermediate Spanish
Monsalve M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PreReq SPA-102, 103 or 201 placement, CoReq SPA-201L 1.00
DET 220
18 10 
SPA-302-01
Intro to Literature
Gomez G
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PreReq SPA-301 or 321 or 302 placement 1.00
DET 128
18 14 
PHY-110L-02
Fluids and Fields Lab
J. Ross
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq PHY-110. 0.00
TBA TBA
11
HIS-230-01
European Music Since 1750
Ables M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HIS-230 = MUS-206 1.00
FIN M140
15 15 
HSP-107-01
History in Drama
Aikens N
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
HSP 107 = ENG-107 - History in Drama - "Race, Resistance, and Revolt in Drama." This course will include some musical theatre and opera and will focus on Latinx drama of the circum-Caribbean. This course will consider theatre as a site of resistance and a primary space in which the nation was being (re)constructed and (re)developed often largely based around issues of race and ethnicity. We'll begin with Inkle and Yarico (1787) which tells the story of an English soldier shipwrecked with an Indian maiden, move to the continent with Beethoven's Fidelio (1805) set with the French Revolution as a backdrop. Then we'll investigate Verdi's Nabuco (1841), which makes a clear analogy between the Jews under Babylonian rule to the Italians under Austro-Hungarian rule. The course will contrast European revolutions with revolutions in the Americas to investigate ideas of nationhood, citizenship, race, belonging, and identity. Other likely plays will include Jose Marti's Abdala (Cuba, 1869), Alejandro Tapia y Rivera's La cuarterona ("The Quadroon," 1867 Spain, 1877 Puerto Rico), and Luis Valdez's Zoot Suit (U.S., 1979). 1.00
TBA TBA
30 28 
ART-227-01
Sculpture
Weedman M
TU TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
FIN A124
13 -2 
ENG-310-02
Studies in Literary Genres
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ENG-310-02 = THE-216: The Modern Stage. 1 credit from ENG at Wabash. 1.00
FIN TGRR
15 15 
CHE-361L-01
Biochemistry Lab
Novak W
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-361 0.00
TBA TBA
16
CHE-361L-02
Biochemistry Lab
Novak W
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-361 0.00
TBA TBA
16
CHE-101L-01
Survey Chemistry Lab
Novak W
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-101 0.00
TBA TBA
20
CHE-101L-02
Survey Chemistry Lab
Teitgen A
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-101 0.00
TBA TBA
20
CHE-106L-01
Survey of Biochemistry Lab
Taylor A
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-106 0.00
TBA TBA
20 -1 
CHE-106L-02
Survey of Biochemistry Lab
Taylor A
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-106 0.00
TBA TBA
20 -2 
CHE-321L-01
Organ Chem II Lab
Wysocki L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-321 0.00
TBA TBA
14
CHE-321L-02
Organ Chem II Lab
Wysocki L
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-321 0.00
TBA TBA
14
CHE-241L-01
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Porter L
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Take CHE-241. 0.00
TBA TBA
16
CHE-241L-02
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Porter L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Take CHE-241. 0.00
TBA TBA
16
CHE-241L-03
Inorganic Chemistry Lab
Porter L
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Take CHE-241. 0.00
TBA TBA
16
GRK-102-01
Beginning Greek II
Wickkiser B
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
GRK-101, GRK-102L 1.00
DET 111
 
BIO-212L-01
Cell Biology Lab
Walsh H
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-212 0.00
TBA TBA
16 11 
BIO-212L-02
Cell Biology Lab
Walsh H
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-212 0.00
TBA TBA
16
BIO-221L-01
Comp Anatomy & Embry Lab
Carlson B
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Registration through instructor only. CoRq BIO-221 0.00
TBA TBA
16
CLA-106-01
Ancient Rome
Hartnett J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
CLA-106 = HIS-212 1.00
HAY 319
50 11 
BIO-112L-01
General Biol II Lab
Ingram A
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-112 0.00
TBA TBA
20 14 
BIO-112L-02
General Biol II Lab
Ingram A
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-112 0.00
TBA TBA
20
BIO-112L-03
General Biol II Lab
Burton P
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-112 0.00
TBA TBA
20 10 
BIO-112L-04
General Biol II Lab
Burton P
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-112 0.00
TBA TBA
20
BIO-101L-03
Human Biology Lab
Sorensen-Kamakian E
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-101 0.00
TBA TBA
18
BIO-101L-04
Human Biology Lab
Wetzel E
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-101 0.00
TBA TBA
18
BLS-280-01
African American History
Lake T
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
BLS-280 = HIS-244: African American History. This survey course will cover African American history in the service of illuminating the experiences of Black people in America. The intent of this course is to situate African Americans within of the American democratic experiment. This approach allows for rich discussions of the political, social and cultural production (i.e., the doings and strivings) of Black Americans. 1.00
DET 112
25 25 
BIO-101L-01
Human Biology Lab
Sorensen-Kamakian E
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-101 0.00
TBA TBA
18 -2 
BIO-101L-02
Human Biology Lab
Carlson B
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-101 0.00
TBA TBA
18
ENG-107-01
History in Drama
Aikens N
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
ENG-107 = HSP 107 - History in Drama- "Race, Resistance, and Revolt in Drama." This course will include some musical theatre and opera and will focus on Latinx drama of the circum-Caribbean. This course will consider theatre as a site of resistance and a primary space in which the nation was being (re)constructed and (re)developed often largely based around issues of race and ethnicity. We'll begin with Inkle and Yarico (1787) which tells the story of an English soldier shipwrecked with an Indian maiden, move to the continent with Beethoven's Fidelio (1805) set with the French Revolution as a backdrop. Then we'll investigate Verdi's Nabuco (1841), which makes a clear analogy between the Jews under Babylonian rule to the Italians under Austro-Hungarian rule. The course will contrast European revolutions with revolutions in the Americas to investigate ideas of nationhood, citizenship, race, belonging, and identity. Other likely plays will include Jose Marti's Abdala (Cuba, 1869), Alejandro Tapia y Rivera's La cuarterona ("The Quadroon," 1867 Spain, 1877 Puerto Rico), and Luis Valdez's Zoot Suit (U.S., 1979). 1.00
CEN 215
30 26 
CSC-361-01
Database System Design
Turner W
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
CSC 361 - Database System Design Database management is a central component of a modern computing environment. This course introduces the fundamental concepts of database design and database languages. Topics include relational databases, SQL, formal relational query languages, the E-R model, relational database design, storage and file structures, indexing and hashing, query processing, transactions, and data warehousing and mining. Prerequisites: Credit or enrollment in CSC 211 Take CSC-211 with a minimum grade of C- 1.00
GOO 101
24 12 
ENG-312-01
Adv. Workshop in Poetry
Mong D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Walt Whitman thought of poetry as an extension of the body. "[T]his is no book," he writes of Leaves of Grass. "Who touches this touches a man." Emily Dickinson was equally visceral in her descriptions of verse: "[i]f I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry." For both writers, poems carried a person into the world through a page. In Advanced Poetry Writing, you too will find a poetic self that is suitable for entry into the world. Workshops will allow us to hear, by way of careful critique, how our poems sound on a reader's tongue. Such work is inherently collaborative. (As Whitman notes: "it is you talking just as much as myself.") Readings in contemporary poetry will ensure that your influences extend beyond your peers. Craft lessons on meter, scansion, forms (rhetorical and stanzaic), tropes, free verse, and poetic movements will supplement our work. We are lucky, in ways that Whitman and Dickinson were not, to have such immediate access to feedback. We'll use that advantage to produce a chapbook-length manuscript of polished work (20+ pages), prefaced by a statement of our poetics. We'll also build a collaborative encyclopedia of poetic terms. The hope is that, when our semester is over, we'll say to each other what Emerson said to Whitman and might have said to Dickinson had he read her exquisite poems: "I greet you at the beginning of a great career" (July 21, 1855). Prerequisites: English 110, English 212, or permission of the instructor (mongd@wabash.edu). ENG-212 1.00
LIB LSEM
15 10 
ENG-330-01
Fascism and Gender
Brewer A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ENG 330 = GEN 304: Facism and Gender. Fascist regimes have historically defined women's primary function as reproductive and domestic. Poets, novelists, journalists, and philosophers have responded to nationalist narratives around the globe by undermining the narrow concept of "nation" that is racialized and gendered. In authoritarian regimes, those who are responsible for creating the myth of the nation use the metaphorical currency of fertility and "degeneracy" to implement social regimentation rooted in misogyny and homophobia. We will look at relationships between fascism, nationalism, misogyny, and racism. We will also explore how women's roles have been defined in proto-fascist and contemporary neo-fascist movements around the globe. We will read George Orwell, Virginia Woolf, Margaret Atwood, JM Coetzee, Zoë Wicomb, Hannah Arendt, James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, and other authors. We will also analyze fascism in film, including Pan's Labyrinth, Ian McKellen's Richard III, and Pink Floyd's The Wall. 1 credit from ENG at Wabash. 1.00
CEN 300
15
ENG-216-01
Intro to Shakespeare
Aikens N
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
CEN 216
30 24 
MAT-112-03
Calculus II
Poffald E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PreReq MAT-110, 111 with a grade of C- or better or 112 placement 1.00
GOO 101
24
MAT-106-01
Fun Modern Topics Mathematics
Cole J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
MAT 106-01 - Topics in Contemporary Mathematics - (Fun) Modern Topics in Mathematics. How can there be infinitely many sizes of infinity? Is there an easy way to tell which knots are just twists that be undone without untying, and which are true knots? What is the math behind public key cryptography? (Can you imagine sharing publicly how to code a message, and imagine no one besides you could decode messages, even with the fastest computers?) Did you know there is still development in the theory of probability for complex situations involving partial information (such as diagnosing a disease or locating a lost airplane)? These questions have in common that they touch on some of the most profound mathematics of our day and that they reveal the depth and beauty of mathematical thinking. Fun inquiry-based learning in this course emphasizes discovery and makes these topics accessible. This course does not count toward the mathematics major or minor. It will count toward the mathematics and science distribution or the quantitative studies requirements. Prerequisites: None 1.00
GOO 104
30
NSC-310-01
Sensory Transduction
Gunther K
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PSY310-01/NSC310-01 SPECIAL TOPICS: SENSORY TRANSDUCTION. In this course we will explore how our senses translate the external world into neural signals. We will review basic neurophysiological concepts such as ion channels, pores, and G-protein coupled receptors. Then we will apply these to the basic senses of touch, hearing, smell, taste, and sight, plus extra senses including such topics as infrared detection and magnetoreception. This course will build on knowledge gained in lower-division courses, and explore these topics in greater depth. Offered first half of the semester. Pre-requisites: PSY/NSC104/204 OR PSY232 OR PSY233 OR BIO112 Pre-requisites: PSY/NSC-104, OR PSY/NSC-204, OR PSY232, OR PSY233, OR BIO112 0.50
BAX 312
25 24 
ART-433-01
Senior Studio
Mohl D, Strader A
F
01:10PM - 04:00PM
F
01:10PM - 04:00PM
ART-330 or 331. 0.50-1.00
FIN A113
FIN A124
 
RHE-370-02
Rhetoric of the News Media
Abbott J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
RHE 370: Rhetoric of the News Media. The news media have been the subject of much heated debate in the past few years. In this seminar-style course, we will explore the role, nature, truthfulness, and functions of the news media through a rhetorical lens. More specifically, we will approach news reports as rhetorical texts as we ask such question as: What qualifies as news; who decides; and how might charges of falsehood relate to these queries? How do traditional journalists and partisan outlets differently define, frame, and report news? And how do their stories influence our perceptions of the topics they address? Finally, what is or should be the role of the news media in a democratic society? In our discussion of these and similar questions, we will consider the historical development of the news media as well as the financial, media, and institutional factors that shape and constrain the news. Students will engage in close rhetorical analysis of news stories and will produce their own news reports. This course counts toward the Literature/Fine Arts distribution requirement. One course credit. Prerequisites: None Take FRT-101. 1.00
FIN S206
20
ART-202-01
Art in Film
Morton E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
FIN M120
40
ART-220-01
Digital Filmmaking
Mohl D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:30PM
TU TH
02:30PM - 04:00PM
1.00
FIN A133
FIN M120
12
ART-225-02
Website Design and Development
Morton E
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
ART 225-02: Topics in Studio: Website Design and Development. The aim of this collaborative, project-centered course is to design and develop the website for the Botswana Society, an NGO devoted to promoting the heritage of the nation of Botswana. Students will study best practices to develop a professional design for the website. In addition, they will collaborate with curators, archaeologists, heritage professionals, and historians from the National Museum and Art Gallery of Botswana, University of Botswana, and the Botswana Society to build the content of the website. Prerequisite: None 1.00
FIN A113
8 -3 
ART-225-03
Performance and Video Art
Weedman M, Strader A
M W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
ART 225-03: Topics in Studio: Performance and Video Art. This course will explore performance and video art both in practice and theory. Through assigned creative projects, group critiques, readings, lectures and viewing professional artists work students will develop a vocabulary pertaining to performance and video art in relationship to art history and practice. This course will provide an experimental platform for students to develop their personal voice. Students will experience and practice live performance, video performance, performative camera, site-specific methods, and collaboration and performance/video installation. One course credit. Prerequisite: None Instructor: Annie Strader & Matthew Weedman 1.00
FIN EXP
12
ART-331-01
Advanced Studio
Mohl D, Strader A
F
01:10PM - 04:00PM
F
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Two credits from ART-125, 126, 223, 224, 225, 227, 228, and 229. At least one credit from the 200 level. 1.00
FIN A113
FIN A124
 
PHI-219-01
Soverignty, Territory, Borders
Gower J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PHI 219-01 = PSC 230-04: Topics in Ethics & Social Philosophy: Sovereignty, Territory, Borders. The concept of sovereignty that arises in early modernity can be described as the supreme authority in a territory. In a modern nation state, sovereign authority secures the relationship between the reigning political order and a territory defined by borders. Yet in our era, the status of sovereignty as the dominant form of political community remains uncertain. On the one hand, the rise of international organizations and the transnational flow of capital, labor, refugees, and violence diminish the central importance of the nation state, leading some theorists to foresee a post-sovereign future. On the other hand, hardened borders, harsh immigration policies, and protectionist trade practices seek to reassert national sovereignty. This course will examine the ambiguous status of sovereignty from a historical and a contemporary perspective. After studying some early modern theorists of sovereignty, we will then consider what happens to political space when the relationship between political order and bounded territory begins to break down. This critical consideration of sovereign authority will then open a discussion of new ways to negotiate borders and inhabit political space. One Course Credit, No Prerequisites 1.00
CEN 305
18
PHI-242-01
Found. of Modern Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
CEN 304
18
REL-172-01
Reformation to Modern Era
Baer J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
CEN 216
50 15 
REL-296-01
Parables Jewish & Christ Trad
Phillips G
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
REL-296 = HUM-296: Parables in Jewish and Christian Traditions. This discussion-based course examines the parable as a distinctive literary form employed by Jews and Christians to engage moral and theological truths. Parabolic stories are imaginative word images used to deepen and disrupt conventional theological and moral perceptions. The course investigates how parables work as language and story, who employs them and for what purpose, how readers deploy and defend against them, and why religious traditions worth their salt both need and resist them. Among the ancient and modern Jewish and Christian parablers studied are Jesus and the Gospel writers, the Rabbis and Hasidim, Kierkegaard and Kafka, Wiesel, Buber, Fackenheim, and Crossan. We also examine the visual parables of Holocaust survivor and painter Samuel Bak and the film "Fight Club." The course engages in the study of literature, language, Jewish and Christian theology, art, film, and religious responses to the Holocaust. 1.00
CEN 304
20 10 
HIS-102-03
World Hist Since 1500
Rhoades M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
BAX 202
35
PHY-381-01
Advanced Laboratory I
Brown J
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
PreReq PHY-210, CoReq PHY-381L 0.50
GOO 310
9
PHY-382-01
Advanced Laboratory II
Brown J
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
PreReq PHY-381 0.50
GOO 310
9
EDU-330-01
Studies in Urban Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
EDU-330 = MAS-330: In this course students study issues related to urban education; in some years it may culminate with an immersion trip in May during the week between finals and graduation. For Spring 2019 the course will NOT include an immersion trip but will incorporate digital pedagogies, speakers, and/or field trips in our study of contemporary approaches to urban education in the U.S. In addition to considering the needs and challenges of urban communities and their schools, we will examine the growing use of alternative licensure programs such as Teach For America (TFA) to provide teachers for high-needs urban school districts across the country. Credits: 0.5 0.50
MXI 214
15
MAS-330-01
Studies in Urban Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
MAS-330 = EDU-330: Studies in Urban Education. SEE EDU-330 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 0.50
MXI 214
15 15 
PHY-210L-01
Intro Quantum Theory & App Lab
N. Tompkins
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq PHY-210 0.00
TBA TBA
 
PHY-110L-01
Fluids and Fields Lab
J. Ross
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq PHY-110. 0.00
TBA TBA
21
PHY-112L-02
General Physics Lab
Brown J
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq PHY-112 0.00
TBA TBA
18 11 
PHY-112L-01
General Physics Lab
Brown J
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq PHY-112 0.00
TBA TBA
18
PSC-346-01
Amer Foreign Policy
Wells M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PSC-111 or 141. 1.00
BAX 212
15
MAS-304-01
Diversity/Multicultural Educat
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
MAS-304 = EDU-303 0.50
MXI 214
15 15 
EDU-303-01
Diversity & Multicultural Ed
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
EDU-303 = MAS-304 0.50
MXI 214
15 -1 
PSC-111-01
Intro to Amer Govt & Politics
T. Masthay
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
BAX 114
35
PSC-311-01
Congress & Executive
T. Masthay
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PSC-111 or permission of instructor. 1.00
BAX 311
15 10 
GEN-304-01
Fascism and Gender
Brewer A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
GEN-304 = ENG-330-01: Facism and Gender. SEE ENG-330-01 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. ENG-105,106,107,109,160,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,260, or 297 1.00
CEN 300
15 14 
MUS-206-01
European Music Since 1750
Ables M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
MUS-206 = HIS-230 1.00
FIN M140
15 14 
ACC-202-02
Management Accounting
Hensley E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PreReq ACC-201 1.00
BAX 202
20
MUS-107-01
Basic Theory and Notation
Spencer R
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
FIN M140
20
CHE-331L-01
Adv Analy Chem Lab
Schmitt P
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-331 0.00
TBA TBA
18
ECO-253-01
Intro Econometrics
Howland F
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Take ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C-., Take MAT-110 or MAT-111 with a minimum grade of C-., Take DV3-252, or PSC-297, or MAT-253 and 353, or PSY-201 and 202. For any prerequisite course(s), a minimum grade of C- is required. 1.00
BAX 214
20
PSY-310-01
Sensory Transduction
Gunther K
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PSY310-01 = NSC310-01: SPECIAL TOPICS: SENSORY TRANSDUCTION. In this course we will explore how our senses translate the external world into neural signals. We will review basic neurophysiological concepts such as ion channels, pores, and G-protein coupled receptors. Then we will apply these to the basic senses of touch, hearing, smell, taste, and sight, plus extra senses including such topics as infrared detection and magnetoreception. This course will build on knowledge gained in lower-division courses, and explore these topics in greater depth. Offered first half of the semester. Pre-requisites: PSY/NSC104/204 OR PSY232 OR PSY233 OR BIO112 # Take PSY-104 or NSC-104 or NSC-204 or PSY-204 or PSY-232 PSY-233 or BIO-112; 0.50
BAX 312
25 25 
PSY-320-01
Research Developmental Psych.
Olofson E
F
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PSY-202 and 220 0.50
BAX 301
12
PSY-331-01
Research in Cognition
Bost P
TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PSY-202 and 231 0.50
BAX 301
12
HIS-497-01
Phil & Craft of Hist
Royalty B
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
GOO 006
 
ASI-260-01
The Vietnam War
Thomas S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ASI-260 = HIS-340-02: The Vietnam War. SEE HIS-340-02 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
BAX 201
20 19 
HIS-244-01
African American History
Lake T
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HIS-244 = BLS-280: African American History. PLEASE SEE BLS-280 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
DET 112
25 18 
THE-216-01
The Modern Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
FIN TGRR
15
BLS-300-02
Magical Realism in African Lit
Pouille A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
BLS-300-02 = FRE-377 = ENG-360: Magical Realism in African Literature. SEE FRE-377 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
DET 226
15 15 
HIS-340-02
The Vietnam War
Thomas S
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
HIS 340-02 = ASI-260: The Vietnam War. George Herring, prominent historian of U.S. foreign relations, has characterized Vietnam as "America's Longest War." What started as a covert operation during World War II when the Office of Strategic Services supported the Viet Minh in French Indochina against the Japanese culminated with the humiliating scenes of Americans fleeing South Vietnam in 1975 as North Vietnamese tanks rumbled into Saigon. The Second Indochina War or the American War, the terms used by the Vietnamese to describe the American phase of the wars against foreigners, divided the United States like no conflict since the Civil War. It tore apart families, communities, and the social fabric of the country, leaving deep wounds in the national psyche. In Vietnam, millions died and in 1975, the Americans and others left behind a devastated economy and society. This course looks at the evolution of the U.S. involvement from the 1940s through the end in 1975 as well as beyond and rapprochement between the two countries. The class focuses on many issues including why the United States became involved in a nation thousands of miles from its shores and why it supported French imperialism and then tried to create a new state in South Vietnam under the control of Ngo Dinh Diem in the 1950s. Then, it looks at the events leading to the massive buildup of American troops in South Vietnam in the mid-1960s and the vicious war against the North Vietnamese Army and their Viet Cong allies that led to massive protests in the United States against the war. It concludes with the efforts of the United States to withdraw from the quagmire, culminating in 1973 with the Paris Peace Accords, and the final dissolution of South Vietnam in 1975. Finally, it looks at the effects of the Vietnam War on all sides and its continuing legacies. Students who choose to take the course as HIS 340 will be expected to write a seminar-length term paper in addition to other coursework. PreReq 1 CR from HIS. 1.00
BAX 201
20 14 
GER-302-01
Intro to Literature
Redding G
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
GER-301 1.00
DET 212
 
GER-312-01
Novel to Film Adaptation
A. Smith
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
GER 312: Novel to Film Adaptation. Taught in English, no pre-requisites required. Referring especially to Seymour Chatman's Story and Discourse: Narrative Structure in Fiction and Film, mise-en-scène, cinematography, and editing analysis, we will analyze the "translation" that occurs from German literary works (in translation) to film. We will do "close readings" of them both side by side and identify which aspects of the stories are lost and gained through intermedial translation-can adaptations be considered "translations" at all? This course counts toward the Film and Digital Media minor. . 1.00
DET 109
 
FRE-102-01
Elementary French II
Pouille A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FRE-101 or FRE-102 placement., CoReq FRE-102L 1.00
DET 211
18
FRE-377-01
Magical Realism in African Lit
Pouille A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FRE-377 = BLS-300-02 = ENG-360: Magical Realism in African Literature. This course will explore the writings of Ben Okri, Syl Cheney-Coker, Kojo Laing and Sony Labou Tansi. To these writers, the intense and rapid movement of individuals and goods experienced in Africa with globalization has challenged consciousness on the continent. While appreciative of the increased connectivity created by globalization, they also see it as a cause of disquieting excesses in modern Africa, and utilize magical realism to account for this social and cultural phenomenon. We will then be working with complex narratives that vacillate between the real and surreal, the normal and the abnormal, the ordinary and the extraordinary, the global and the local, the new and the old. Some of our main objectives will be to identify if Okri, Cheney-Coker, Laing and Tansi's works vary from the magical writings found in Latin America, if they translate the change unfolding in contemporary Africa well, and if there are precedents in African literature that might have inspired their writings. Class is open to all, and will meet on TTR from 1:10 to 2:25. Students taking it for a French credit will read, discuss and write about the texts in French. For students seeking French credit, FRE-301 and FRE-302 are prerequisites. Please contact Prof. Pouille (pouillea@wabash.edu) for any question (s). 1.00
DET 226
15 13 
CHI-311-01
Studies in Chinese Language
Li Y
M
02:00PM - 03:00PM
TH
02:30PM - 03:30PM
PreReq CHI-301 or CHI-311 placement., CoReq CHI-311L. 1.00
DET 226
DET 112
5
FRE-202-01
Heroic Exploits in Normandy
Quandt K
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
FRE-202: Heroic Exploits in Normandy, France. Immersion Trip; Registration through instructor only. FRE-201 or FRE-202 placement., FRE-202L 1.00
DET 211
15
CHI-102L-03
Elementary Chinese II Lab
Staff
W
02:10PM - 03:00PM
CoReq CHI-102. 0.00
DET 209
4
GER-102-02
Elementary German II
A. Smith
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
GER-101 or GER-102 placement, GER-102L 1.00
DET 111
 
GER-102L-05
Elementary German II Lab.
Staff
W
02:10PM - 03:00PM
CoReq GER-102 0.00
TBA TBA
 
HIS-340-01
History & Politics of Hip Hop
Thomas S, Marshall N
M W F
02:10PM - 03:25PM
HIS 240/340-01 = ENG 270 = MAS 244 = BLS-300-01: The History and Politics of Hip-Hop (can be taken as a 300-level History seminar with instructor approval). Students who elect to take the course as HIS 340 will be expected to write a seminar-length term paper in addition to other coursework. SEE HIS-240-01 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
MXI 109
5
HIS-260-01
Tiananmen Square 1989
Healey C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
HIS-260 = ASI-112 SEE ASI-112 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
DET 128
20 15 
PSY-222-01
Social Psychology
Horton R
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PSY-201 (may be taken concurrently) 1.00
BAX 311
25 12 
ECO-253-02
Intro Econometrics
Byun C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
Take ECO-101 with a minimum grade of C-., Take MAT-110 or MAT-111 with a minimum grade of C-., Take DV3-252, or PSC-297, or MAT-253 and 353, or PSY-201 and 202. For any prerequisite course(s), a minimum grade of C- is required. 1.00
BAX 214
20
ECO-333-01
Industrial Organization
E. Dunaway
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PreReq ECO-251, 253, and 291 1.00
BAX 201
25 15 
PSC-131-01
Intro to Political Theory
McCrary L
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
DET 109
35 14 
PSC-322-01
Politics of the European Union
Hollander E
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PSC-322: Politics of the European Union. This course requires concurrent registration for ECO-221 - Economics of the European Union. Immerison trip; Registration through instructor only. Concurrent Registration with ECO-221. 1.00
BAX 212
 
EDU-370-01
Colonial & Postcolonial Educat
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
EDU-370 = HIS-300-03 = MAS-371: Colonial & Postcolonial Education. This course takes a postcolonial perspective to examine the ways in which colonial systems of education have been envisioned and implemented as tools for cultural expansion and imperialism. We will consider these broad themes in relation to the specific experiences of selected writers from Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean, with particular attention to the educational colonization of the indigenous peoples of North America in the "Indian Schools" of the U.S. and Canada. During the second half of the course, students will conduct independent research into a culture or region of their choice. 1.00
DET 220
12
MAS-244-01
History & Politics of Hip Hop
Marshall N, Thomas S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:25PM
MAS-244 = HIS-240/340-01 = BLS-300-01 = ENG-270: The History and Politics of Hip-Hop (can be taken as a 300-level History seminar with instructor approval). SEE HIS-240-01 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
MXI 109
25 25 
MAS-371-01
Colonial & Postcolonial Educat
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
MAS-371 = EDU-370 = HIS-300: Colonial & Postcolonial Education. Prerequisites: Take FRT-101, Take 1 credit from department EDU or HIS at the 200 level or above. SEE EDU-370 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
DET 220
12 12 
HIS-200-01
Empires & Cult of Middle East
Royalty B
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
HIS-200: Empires and Cultures of the "Middle East." This course surveys the history of the region from Morocco to Iran (and beyond), called variously the Near East, the Middle East, North Africa, the Maghreb, Al Jazeera . . . from the origins of Islamic Arabia to the modern post-colonial period. A focus on empire will take us from Persia and Byzantium to Britain, with our main focus on the Arabic and Ottoman empires of the medieval and modern period, including Muhammed and the Arabic conquests andcolonization of the region. We will consider the links between the "Middle East" that we know of today and these ancient regional empires as well as the cultural blend that comes to be called "Middle Eastern," which we'll explore via food and film as well as history. 1 Credit, No prerequisites. 1.00
BAX 312
25 21 
HIS-220-01
Europe 1400-1800
Morillo S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
His 220: Topics in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Specific title: Europe 1400-1800. This class will examine a crucial period in European history during which a relatively traditional agrarian society went "off the rails", transitioning into something susceptible to industrialization. We will look at this history from a number of different historiographical perspectives, in effect covering the period 1400-1800 as social history, then economic history, then political-military history, then cultural history. 1.00
BAX 114
25 14 
HIS-231-01
19th Century Europe
Rhoades M
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
GOO 305
25 24 
HIS-240-01
History & Politics of Hip Hop
Thomas S, Marshall N
M W F
02:10PM - 03:25PM
HIS 240/340-01 = ENG 270 = MAS 244 = BLS-300-01: The History and Politics of Hip-Hop (can be taken as a 300-level History seminar with instructor approval). "You know what's gonna happen with Hip-Hop? Whatever's happening with us" If we smoked out, Hip-Hop is gonna be smoked out If we doin alright, Hip-Hop is gonna be doin' alright .So the next time you ask yourself where Hip-Hop is goin' ask yourself.. where am I goin? How am I doin? -Mos Def, "Fear Not Of Man." This course will examine hip hop as cultural, social, and political history. It will explore the political and aesthetic foundations of hip-hop cultural practices including music, dance, visual art, literature, performance, and protest. Particular attention is given to the sociopolitical and economic conditions and context from which hip-hop culture originates incorporating notions of race, class, gender, and identity. The course will pay particular attention to how hip-hop engages gender and notions of the masculine/feminine. This course is team-taught, and students will benefit from a dual approach to hip-hop that includes academic study and experiential learning. Course sources will combine primary and secondary source documents, including artistic, personal, audio and video sources, that encourage critical inquiry and engagement with defining issues of historical significance in the development of hip-hop culture. Students who elect to take the course as HIS 340 will be expected to write a seminar-length term paper in addition to other coursework. 1.00
MXI 109
25 16 
THE-204-01
World Cinema
Abbott M
M F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
W
02:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
FIN M120
FIN M120
30
REL-194-01
Religion and Film
Nelson D
M F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
W
02:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
CEN 304
HAY 104
24
RHE-101-03
Public Speaking
Abbott J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
FIN FA206
20
MAT-106-02
Mathematics of Games & Sports
Z. Gates
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
MAT 106-02 - Topics in Contemporary Mathematics - Mathematics of Games and Sports. In this course, we examine applications of mathematics in games, sports, and gambling. Students will learn topics such as discrete probability, statistics, and counting arguments through analyzing dice games, card games, batting averages, and mathematical games such as Sudoku and Nim. This course does not count toward the mathematics major or minor. It will count toward the mathematics and science distribution or the quantitative studies requirements. Prerequisites: None 1.00
GOO 104
30
MAT-110-01
Calc. I With Pre-Calc. Review
Cole J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
MAT-010 with a grade of C- or better. 1.00
HAY 003
30
MAT-223-01
Elementary Linear Algebra
Ansaldi K
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PreReq MAT-112 with a minimum grade of C- or 223 placement. 1.00
GOO 101
30 25 
BLS-300-01
History & Politics of Hip Hop
Thomas S, Marshall N
M W F
02:10PM - 03:25PM
BLS-300-01 = HIS 240/340-01 = MAS 244 = ENG-270: The History and Politics of Hip-Hop (can be taken as a 300-level History seminar with instructor approval). SEE HIS-240-01 FOR DESCRIPTION. 1.00
MXI 109
25 21 
CHE-421-01
Org Chem of Plant Natural Prod
Teitgen A
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
CHE-421: Organic Chemistry of Plant Natural Products. ½ credit, secondhalf semester. Prerequisite: CHE321. This course will use organic chemistry to further the understanding of plant natural products. Of the known 400,000 plant species in the world only a small percentage of natural products have been studied, yet 25% of our pharmaceuticals come from these specialized compounds. Students will engage the primary literature to study the use of organic chemistry in specializedbiosynthetic pathways and a variety of analytical techniques that can identify new natural products. CHE-321 0.50
HAY 321
16 14 
ECO-101-02
Princ of Economics
Saha S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
BAX 202
30
SPA-301-01
Conversation & Composition
Monsalve M
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PreReq SPA-202 or SPA-301 placement. 1.00
DET 112
18 12 
SPA-202-02
Span.Lang. & Hispanic Cultures
Hardy J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PreReq SPA-201 or 202 placement, CoReq SPA-202L 1.00
DET 212
18 11 
ENG-270-01
History & Politics of Hip Hop
Thomas S, Marshall N
M W F
02:10PM - 03:25PM
ENG-270 = HIS-240/340-01 = BLS-300-01 = MAS-244: The History and Politics of Hip-Hop (can be taken as a 300-level History seminar with instructor approval). SEE HIS-240-01 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 1.00
MXI 109
25 21 
ASI-112-01
Tiananmen Square 1989
Healey C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
ASI-112 = HIS-260. Studies in Asian Culture/Topics in Asian History: The Politics of Memory: Tiananmen Square 1989. Who decides how we remember history? In spring 1989 Chinese citizens gathered in Tiananmen Square, peacefully calling for democracy and political reform. In the early hours of June 4, the People's Liberation Army stormed the square with assault rifles and tanks, massacring civilians in its wake. International media coverage produced some of the most iconic images of the twentieth century. Meanwhile, the Chinese government mobilized a decades-long campaign to suppress and censor the events of that spring, resulting in a form of collective amnesia. Thirty years later, the Tiananmen Square Massacre remains a sensitive topic. This course will reflect on how the protests and their aftermath have been remembered and forgotten within China and abroad. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, the course will consider sources ranging from government documents and journalistic footage to literature and film to rock music and social media memes. 1.00
DET 128
20 15 
HIS-300-03
Colonial & Postcolonial Educat
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
HIS-300-03 = EDU-370 = MAS-371: Colonial & Postcolonial Education. Prerequisites: Take FRT-101, Take 1 credit from department EDU or HIS at the 200 level or above. SEE EDU-370 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 0.5 credit from HIS 1.00
DET 220
12 10 
NSC-332-01
Research Sensation/Perception
Gunther K
M
02:15PM - 03:30PM
NSC-332 = PSY-332 Pre-Req. PSY-232 Prereq PSY-232 0.50
BAX 312
12 12 
PSY-332-01
Research Sensation/Perception
Gunther K
M
02:15PM - 03:30PM
PSY-332 = NSC-332 Pre-req. PSY-232 PreReq PSY-232 0.50
BAX 301
12
GRK-301-01
Advanced Greek Reading: Poetry
Wickkiser B
M W
02:30PM - 03:50PM
Immersion trip; Registration through instructor only. GRK-201 1.00
TBA TBA
 
LAT-102L-02
Beginning Latin Lab II
Hartnett J
TU
02:40PM - 03:30PM
CoReq LAT-102 0.00
DET 111
 
GHL-277-01
Epidemiology
Wickkiser B
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
GHL-277-01 = CLA-113-01 = HIS-210-01 SEE CLA-113-01 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 0.50
DET 209
30 23 
GHL-277-02
Epidemiology
Wickkiser B
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
GHL-277-02 = CLA-113-02 = HIS-210-02 SEE CLA-113-02 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 0.50
DET 209
20 16 
ECO-241-01
Game Theory
Burnette J
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
BAX 114
26
CLA-111-01
Ancient and American Lessons
Kubiak D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CLA-111-01 = PSC-230-02 Leading Effectively: Ancient and American Lessons. Pericles, Alexander the Great, Cicero, Julius Caesar - these names have lived on as powerful reminders of the debt western civilization owes to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Despite shifts in historical approach, we continue to be fascinated by the "great man" and his impact on the events that have been crucial to the development of our own culture. Even popular media appreciate the attraction, with movies like Spartacus, Alexander, and multiple episodes of the History Channel. One of our chief sources of knowledge about important men of antiquity is Plutarch, a Greek writer living in the Roman Empire (A.D. 46-120). He composed a series of biographies known as the Parallel Lives, in which he pairs a Greek and Roman leader who he thinks are in some way connected. As Plutarch himself says at the beginning of his life of Alexander, his main concern is not so much historical as ethical. He wants to present to readers models of great-hearted men for imitation in their own lives, and for this reason Plutarch's biographies have had a great influence on the personal formation of the educated classes in European and American history. Ralph Waldo Emerson called Plutarch's Lives "a bible for heroes", and before him they were read by the American Founding Fathers, who discovered in these texts many ethical concepts that were to inform their ideas about the creation of a free republic. With a work of secondary scholarship, The Founders and the Classics: Greece, Rome, and the American Enlightenment by C.J. Richard, we will examine this topic in detail. 0.5 credits (half-semester; choose to take it first half or second half of semester) 0.50
DET 109
 
CLA-111-02
Ancient and American Lessons
Kubiak D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CLA-111-02 = PSC-230-03 Leading Effectively: Ancient and American Lessons. Pericles, Alexander the Great, Cicero, Julius Caesar - these names have lived on as powerful reminders of the debt western civilization owes to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Despite shifts in historical approach, we continue to be fascinated by the "great man" and his impact on the events that have been crucial to the development of our own culture. Even popular media appreciate the attraction, with movies like Spartacus, Alexander, and multiple episodes of the History Channel. One of our chief sources of knowledge about important men of antiquity is Plutarch, a Greek writer living in the Roman Empire (A.D. 46-120). He composed a series of biographies known as the Parallel Lives, in which he pairs a Greek and Roman leader who he thinks are in some way connected. As Plutarch himself says at the beginning of his life of Alexander, his main concern is not so much historical as ethical. He wants to present to readers models of great-hearted men for imitation in their own lives, and for this reason Plutarch's biographies have had a great influence on the personal formation of the educated classes in European and American history. Ralph Waldo Emerson called Plutarch's Lives "a bible for heroes", and before him they were read by the American Founding Fathers, who discovered in these texts many ethical concepts that were to inform their ideas about the creation of a free republic. With a work of secondary scholarship, The Founders and the Classics: Greece, Rome, and the American Enlightenment by C.J. Richard, we will examine this topic in detail. 0.5 credits (half-semester; choose to take it first half or second half of semester) 0.50
DET 109
 
CLA-113-01
From Zeus to Zika: Epidem Dis
Wickkiser B
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CLA-113-01 = GHL-277-01 = HIS-210-01 From Zeus to Zika: A History of Epidemic Disease. Health is a universal concern: everyone gets sick at one time or another and we all seek healers in order to regain or maintain our health. In this way, we are much the same as the ancient Greeks and Romans. Take a journey through time to see what tools and methods the Greeks and Romans used to treat diseases that fell upon large populations (epidemic diseases), what these diseases were, and how the epidemics themselves and medical approaches to them have changed with new discoveries. Along the way, we'll study plagues in Athens and Rome, the Black Death of the Middle Ages, cholera outbreaks in nineteenth-century London, and contemporary epidemics like AIDS and Zika. Students will engage the material through discussion, presentations, short written assignments, and quizzes. This course is required for the Global Health minor. 0.50
DET 209
30 14 
CLA-113-02
From Zeus to Zika: Epidem Dis
Wickkiser B
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CLA-113-02 = GHL-277-02 = HIS-210-02 From Zeus to Zika: A History of Epidemic Disease. Health is a universal concern: everyone gets sick at one time or another and we all seek healers in order to regain or maintain our health. In this way, we are much the same as the ancient Greeks and Romans. Take a journey through time to see what tools and methods the Greeks and Romans used to treat diseases that fell upon large populations (epidemic diseases), what these diseases were, and how the epidemics themselves and medical approaches to them have changed with new discoveries. Along the way, we'll study plagues in Athens and Rome, the Black Death of the Middle Ages, cholera outbreaks in nineteenth-century London, and contemporary epidemics like AIDS and Zika. Students will engage the material through discussion, presentations, short written assignments, and quizzes. This course is required for the Global Health minor. 0.50
DET 209
20
PHI-299-01
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PHI-299 = EDU-201 = MAS-201 1.00
MXI 214
18 17 
PHI-346-01
Analytic Philosophy
Carlson M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PHI-346-01: Analytic Philosophy. The period spanning the late 19th to the early 20th centuries was a period of spectacular development in mathematics, natural science, and philosophy. New theories in physics---think Bohr and Einstein, for example---promised to reveal something about the deep structure of our universe. At the same time, sophisticated new techniques of mathematical logic and scientific approaches to psychology promised to make possible the rigorous scientific study of thought itself. Analytic philosophy developed in close connection to these developments in mathematics and natural science. The early analytic philosophers were keen to apply the newly developed tools of mathematical logic to solving (or dissolving) old philosophical problems by careful linguistic analysis. Using these tools, they went on to develop new theories of the structure of reality, and explanations of how it is possible for us to think, and to know, about what reality is like. In all of this work they aimed for clarity, precision, and the development of what they called "scientific philosophy". In this course, we will study some of the major themes and debates in early analytic philosophy by carefully considering work of some of the major philosophers of this period, including Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Carnap, and Quine. Pre-Req: Take PHI-242 OR PHI-270 1.00
GOO 305
12
ENG-180-01
Science & Speculative Fiction
Brewer A
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
ENG 180-01: Science and Speculative Fiction. In "Science and Speculative Fiction," we will analyze the social, historical, and political contexts for such themes as time travel, artificial intelligence, genetic engineering, alien invasion, and biological interdependence. We will read fiction by H.G. Wells, Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Octavia Butler, Margaret Atwood, and others, as well as graphic novels. The movies will include Metropolis, the Matrix trilogy, and District 9. 1.00
CEN 215
30 25 
RHE-290-01
Deliberation and Democracy
Drury S
TU TH
02:40PM - 04:00PM
RHE 290-01 - DELIBERATION & DEMOCRACY. Deliberation is a process through which public conversations occur and decisions can be made. During deliberation, citizens come together, share opinions, critique arguments and reasons, expand their understanding and perspective, and ultimately, seek to make public choices about pressing problems in their community. In this course, we will explore the theories and practices of democratic deliberation, evaluate the potentials for and limits of deliberation, and discuss and evaluate framing and facilitation techniques in diverse settings such as community meetings, strategic planning, and business. Assignments will include practice facilitations and deliberations, public facilitations, theory response papers, and a deliberation project. Although this course is open to all students from all majors, students interested in becoming a WDPD Democracy Fellows should take this course. This class qualifies as a Language Studies credit. One course credit. Prerequisites: None Instructor: Sara Drury 1.00
FIN S206
20
REL-210-01
Muhammad & Qur'an Islam Imagin
Blix D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
REL-210-01 Topics in Islam: : Muhammad and the Qur'an in the Islamic Imagination. What roles do Muhammad and the Qur'an play in the Islamic imagination? How have these roles changed from antiquity to now? How do they affect the shape of Islam in the contemporary world? In this course we will begin by studying the life and times of Muhammad, drawing on a wide range of print and visual media. We will then study the Qur'an itself, doing a close reading of selected suras. We will analyze them for themes, rhetorical strategies (including oral recitation), and the overall "logic" of the Qur'anic worldview. We will especially look at the innovative ways the Qur'an has been read by Sufi mystics and, more recently, by women. We will conclude by looking at the role of Muhammad and the Qur'an in Islamic poetry and fiction. One course credit. Prerequisite: Religion 103, or the consent of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. Prereq REL-103 or Permission of Instructor 1.00
CEN 304
20 14 
PHI-144-01
Introduction to Existentialism
Hughes C
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
CEN 216
25
PSY-301-01
Literature Review
Horton R
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PreReq PSY-201 1.00
BAX 301
11
HIS-300-02
War & Conflict in Middle Ages
Morillo S
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
His 300-02: War and Conflict in the Middle Ages: A Global Perspective This course will examine the full range of armed conflict across the globe in the period between the fall of the great classical empires and the globalization of the world network in the late 1400s. We will explore, through primary sources and secondary readings, the connection of conflict with network activity, state building, cultural constructions, and social structures. Student research will focus on case studies within the larger framework of the course. 0.5 credit from HIS 1.00
BAX 201
15
GER-102L-06
Elementary German II Lab.
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:30PM
CoReq GER-102 0.00
TBA TBA
 
FRE-102L-03
Elementary French II Lab.
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq FRE-102 0.00
DET 211
6
FRE-202L-03
French Lang: Cultural Lab.
To be Announced
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq FRE-202 0.00
DET 211
5
THE-205-01
Acting for the Camera
H. Vogel
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
ACTING FOR THE CAMERA. This course will expand on skills introduced in Introduction to Acting. Through analysis, study of screen-acting techniques and scene study, we will expand each performer's range of emotional, intellectual, physical, and vocal expressiveness for the camera. Students will participate in on-camera exercises, television and film scenes, and web shorts. Prereq THE-105. 1.00
FIN EXP
16
MAS-201-01
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
MAS-201 = EDU-201 = PHI-299 Take FRT-101; Minimum Grade D; 1.00
MXI 214
18 18 
EDU-201-01
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
EDU-201 = PHI-299 = MAS-201 1.00
MXI 214
18
PSC-230-01
Citizenship in Dystopia
McCrary L
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
Citizenship in Dystopia: Political Theory in Fiction and Film. Using short stories, science fiction, film, and political theory, the class will explore imagined dystopian futures, examining what they have to say about contemporary debates. Questions to consider include: How are governments organized to repress human action? Does ever increasing technological development, enforced equality, and eugenic selection limit individual freedom? How can the human spirit aspire to greatness in the midst of forces, whether political or social, dragging it down? This course counts toward the Film and Digital Media minor. 1.00
BAX 212
20 11 
MUS-222-01
Electronic Music History & Lit
Renk C
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
FIN M138
12
ECO-277-01
Topics in Behavioral Economics
E. Dunaway
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
ECO 277: Topics in Behavioral Economics Behavioral Economics, a relatively new field in economic theory, attempts to bridge the divide between the classical microeconomic model and what we observe in the real world. In this class, we will explore concepts like mental accounting (or why my bank account never seems to have as much money in it as I remember), hyperbolic discounting (or why I keep hitting the snooze button on my alarm clock), reciprocity (or why I charge less to people I know better), and prospect theory (or why I weigh my fear of getting a C on an exam much more than my joy of getting an A on it), among other topics. PreReq ECO-101 1.00
BAX 214
25 -1 
GEN-300-01
Perform Self Contemp Span Cult
Y. Castillo Botello
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
GEN-300 = SPA-313-02: The Performance of Self in Contemporary Spanish Culture. SEE SPA-313-02 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. ENG-105,106,107,109,160,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,260, or 297 0.50
CEN 305
18 18 
ACC-202-01
Management Accounting
Hensley E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PreReq ACC-201 1.00
BAX 202
50 31 
HIS-210-01
From Zeus to Zika: Epidem Dis
Wickkiser B
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HIS-210-01 = CLA-113-01 = GHL-277-01 SEE CLA-113-01 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 0.50
DET 209
30 28 
HIS-210-02
From Zeus to Zika: Epidem Dis
Wickkiser B
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HIS-210-02 = CLA-113-02 = GHL-277-02 SEE CLA-113-02 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 0.50
DET 209
20 19 
ENG-220-01
Amer Lit after 1900
M. Lambert
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
CEN 300
30 15 
PSC-230-02
Ancient and American Lessons
Kubiak D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PSC-230-02 = CLA-111-01 SEE CLA-111-01 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 0.50
DET 109
 
PSC-230-03
DeTocqueville
Kubiak D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PSC-230-03 = CLA-111-02 SEE CLA-111-02 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION. 0.50
DET 109
 
SPA-201L-02
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq SPA-201 0.00
DET 212
7
SPA-202L-04
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq SPA-202 0.00
DET 212
7
SPA-313-01
Madness & Violence Span Theat
Rogers D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
SPA 313: Madness and Violence in Spanish Theatre. Spanish literature has always had a particular fascination with madness. Pablo Neruda famously said: "Hay un cierto placer en la locura, que solo el loco conoce." In fact, the first modern, European novel, Don Quijote (1615) is organized around an exploration of reality vs. psychosis in its eponymous protagonist. Modern Spanish and Latin American theater have also explored similar themes across a variety of characters and contexts. This coming semester, we'll examine the role of madness and its connection to violence in works by Lorca, Artaud, Rodolfo Usigli, Osvaldo Drag n, Griselda Gambaro, and others. We'll be particularly interested in the way that theater facilitates the representation and exploration of ideas and characters that polite society asks us to overlook. Questions of political violence and gender will be of particular concern to us. This short, ½ credit course is for students who have completed or are co-registered in SPA 302. SPA-301 and 302 0.50
DET 220
18 13 
SPA-313-02
Perform Self Contemp Span Cult
Y. Castillo Botello
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
SPA-313-02 = GEN-300: The Performance of Self in Contemporary Spanish Culture. In this course we will study notions of self-fashioning and performance in contemporary Spain, and the ways in which social groups in the margins have historically constructed and negotiated their identities in response to official narratives of both, exclusion and appropriation. We will explore some of the theoretical and cultural debates surrounding race, ethnicity, gender and linguistic diversity in Spanish discourses of culture and nationhood; and will examine art, literary texts, films and performances that directly engage with these issues. All discussions and assignments will be in Spanish, with some readings in English. This course counts toward the Spanish major and minor, the Hispanic Studies major, the Gender Studies minor and the Language Studies requirement. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or 302, or permission from the instructor SPA-301 and 302 0.50
CEN 305
18 14 
SPA-102L-05
Elementary Spanish II Lab
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq SPA-102 0.00
DET 128
5
SPA-102L-03
Elementary Spanish II Lab
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq SPA-102 0.00
DET 128
5
SPA-102L-01
Elementary Spanish II Lab
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq SPA-102 0.00
DET 128
5
SPA-201L-01
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq SPA-201 0.00
DET 212
7
SPA-103L-02
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq SPA-103 0.00
DET 112
6
SPA-202L-05
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq SPA-202 0.00
DET 212
8
SPA-202L-03
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq SPA-202 0.00
DET 212
7
FRE-302-01
Intro to Literature
Quandt K
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
FRE-301 1.00
DET 226
10
FRE-102L-01
Elementary French II Lab.
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq FRE-102 0.00
DET 211
6
CHI-102L-04
Elementary Chinese II Lab
Staff
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHI-102. 0.00
DET 209
4
CHI-202L-01
Intermediate Chinese II Lab
Staff
TH
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHI-202. 0.00
DET 226
5
GER-202L-02
German Lang. & Culture Lab.
Staff
TH
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq GER-202 0.00
TBA TBA
 
PSY-204-01
Principles of Neuroscience
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
PSY-204 = NSC-204 1.00
BAX 202
40 35 
CHI-102L-01
Elementary Chinese II Lab
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHI-102. 0.00
DET 209
4
CHI-102L-02
Elementary Chinese II Lab
Staff
TU
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHI-102. 0.00
DET 112
4
PHI-249-01
Medieval Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
PHI 249-01: Topics in History of Philosophy: Medieval Philosophy. Medieval philosophers drew on ancient philosophical arguments to systematize and offer rational support for the Abrahamic religions of Judiasm, Christianity and Islam. Drawing mainly on Aristotle and Plato and their followers, medieval philosophers apply ancient thinking to religious texts to transform both. This course will examine the central debates of medieval philosophy by contextualizing them in the religious commitments and conflicts that motivated the debates. For example, Christian thinkers were asked to explain how the Eucharistic bread on the altar could become the body of Christ during the consecration if the Body of Christ had ascended to heaven and two bodies cannot be in the same place at once. To answer this question, philosophers like Aquinas, Giles of Rome, Duns Scotus and Ockham argue over what changes - is it the substance, the accidents, or the place of the bread? Similarly, arguments about the immortality of the soul become for medieval philosophers questions about the existence of universals and the causes of individuation of particular substances. This course will examine these and similar questions with an eye to how the debates were motivated by religious concerns. Throughout the course, we will consider the relationship between reason and faith in coming to understand the world on the one hand with those who thought reason alone was sufficient for knowledge and all across the spectrum to those who thought that without faith no one could fully understand the world. Students interested in philosophy or religion should take this course. One Course Credit; No Prerequisites 1.00
CEN 300
18 13 
RHE-140-01
Argumentation & Debate
Drury J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
FIN FA206
20
NSC-204-01
Principles of Neuroscience
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
NSC-204 = PSY-204 1.00
BAX 202
40 37 
CSC-101-02
Intro to Computer Science
McKinney C
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
HAY 003
24 -5 
MAT-222-01
Theory of Numbers
Ansaldi K
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
MAT-112 1.00
GOO 101
20 10 
ECO-251-01
Economic Approach With Excel
Howland F
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
ECO-101 0.50
BAX 214
30
DV3-254-01
Social Science Modeling: Excel
Howland F
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
ECO-251 0.50
BAX 214
15
ECO-101-03
Princ of Economics
Byun C
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
BAX 114
30
ECO-221-01
Economics of European Union
Mikek P
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
ECO-221: Economics of the European Union* The course includes a variety of topics related to current economic policy and institutional arrangements in the EU, ranging from labor markets and common monetary policy to international trade policy and challenges of growth. The goal of this class is to develop a deeper understanding of the economic structure and policies of the European Union (EU). Additionally, the class will help students to become familiar with some data sources for information about the EU. Finally, economic policy is done in the cultural, historical, and social context of individual countries; therefore, some of this context will be included in class. The regular in-class approach will be complemented with an immersion trip to visit EU institutions, such as the European Commission in Brussels, Belgium, and the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany. This course requires concurrent registration for PSC 322: Politics of the European Union. Immersion trip; Registration through the instructor only. Take Concurrent Registration with PSC-322. 1.00
BAX 212
 
LAT-102-01
Beginning Latin II
Hartnett J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
LAT-101 or LAT-102 placement, Take LAT-102L 1.00
DET 111
 
ENG-499-01
Capstone Portfolio
Mong D
TH
04:00PM - 05:00PM
ENG-311, 312, or 313 0.50
LIB LSEM
15 12 
MUS-153-01
Glee Club
Spencer R
TU TH
04:15PM - 06:00PM
0.50
FIN CONC
45
MUS-156-01
Wamidan World Music Ensemble
Makubuya J
W F
05:00PM - 06:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
 
COL-402-01
Important Books
Blix D, McKinney C
W
07:30PM - 09:00PM
1.00
CEN 304
15
ART-388-01
Independent Study
Morton E
TBA
TBA - TBA
2 courses from ART. 0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
3
GRK-102L-01
Elem Greek Lab
Wickkiser B
TBA
TBA - TBA
CoReq GRK-102 0.00
TBA TBA
 
CLA-400-01
Senior Reading
Kubiak D
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
 
CHE-488-01
Undergrad Research Experience
Feller S
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
 
CHE-488-02
Undergrad Research Experience
Novak W
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
 
CHE-488-03
Undergrad Research Experience
Schmitt P
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
 
CHE-488-04
Undergrad Research Experience
Teitgen A
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
 
CHE-488-05
Undergrad Research Experience
Taylor A
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
 
CHE-488-06
Undergrad Research Experience
Wysocki L
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
 
PSY-496-03
Senior Project
Horton R
TBA
TBA - TBA
PSY-495 0.50
TBA TBA
 
PSY-496-04
Senior Project
Olofson E
TBA
TBA - TBA
PSY-495 0.50
TBA TBA
 
PSY-496-05
Senior Project
Schmitzer-Torbert N
TBA
TBA - TBA
PSY-495 0.50
TBA TBA
 
PSY-496-01
Senior Project
Bost P
TBA
TBA - TBA
PSY-495 0.50
TBA TBA
 
GER-277-01
German Lang & Cult in Context
Redding G
TBA
TBA - TBA
GER-277: German Language and Culture in Context. Immersion Trip; Registration through instructor only. 0.50
TBA TBA
 
MUS-301L-01
Music Theory Lab II
Renk C
TBA
TBA - TBA
CoReq MUS-301 0.00
TBA TBA
15 13 
PHY-278-01
Computational Physics
Brown J
TBA
TBA - TBA
PHY 278: Computational Physics ½ CR. Students in this course will learn to use Python to model physical systems. Topics to be explored will include finite difference and spectral methods to model complex systems, the origin of chaotic behavior and in physical models, and numerical solutions to linear systems. 0.50
TBA TBA
9
MUS-461-01
Advanced Applied Music
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-460. 0.50
TBA TBA
2
MUS-161-01
Beginning Applied Music
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-160 and Complete Department Placement Exam or MUS-107. 0.50
TBA TBA
 
ECO-277-02
Special Topics
Mikek P
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq ECO-101 1.00
TBA TBA
2
HIS-388-01
Ind: Food in World History
Warner R
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
ECO-388-01
Independent Study
Howland F
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
HIS-288-01
Independent Study
Warner R
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
2
ART-398-01
Independent Study
Mohl D
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
MAT-388-01
Complex Analysis
Poffald E
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
MUS-288-01
Independent Study
Makubuya J
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
RHE-487-01
Independent Study/Lang Studies
Drury S
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
GRK-400-01
Senior Reading
Kubiak D
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
MUS-361-01
Intermediate Applied Music II
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-360. 0.50
TBA TBA
2
EDU-423-01
Student Teaching Practicum
A. Phillips, Seltzer-Kelly D
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReqEDU-101,201,202,302,330. 0.5 credits from EDU-401,402, 403,404 3.00
TBA TBA
 
ECO-377-03
Special Topics
Byun C
TBA
TBA - TBA
ECO-101, 253, and 291 or 292, and 361 or 362 1.00
TBA TBA
1
MUS-151-01
Brass Ensemble
Downey C
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
 
MUS-487-01
Independent Study
Spencer R
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
GEN-488-01
Independent Study
Trott A
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
CSC-271-01
Special Topics in Comp.Sci.
McKinney C
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq CSC-111 or permission of the instructor. 0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
RHE-488-01
Independent Study/Lit Fine Art
Drury J
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
BLS-400-01
African-American Humor
Lake T
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
MUS-051-01
Brass Ensemble (No Credit)
Downey C
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
 
BIO-388-01
Independent Study
Sorensen-Kamakian E
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1 -1 
PSC-388-01
Independent Study
Hollander E
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
EDU-388-01
Independent Study
Seltzer-Kelly D
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
HIS-498-01
Research Seminar
Morillo S
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
EDU-388-02
IND: Middle School Math Teach
Seltzer-Kelly D
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
BIO-388-02
Independent Study
Burton P
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
ASI-288-01
Independent Study
Warner R
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
MUS-056-01
Wamidan Wld Music Ens (No Cr)
Makubuya J
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-053-01
Glee Club (No Credit)
Spencer R
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PSY-495-01
Senior Project
Bost P
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq: PSY-202, PSY-301 (may be taken concurrently) 0.50
TBA TBA
1
MUS-261-01
Intermediate Applied Music I
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-260. 0.50
TBA TBA
 
REL-490-01
Sr. Sem: Nature & Study of Rel
Baer J
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
ECO-377-02
Special Topics
Mikek P
TBA
TBA - TBA
ECO-101, 253, and 291 or 292, and 361 or 362 1.00
TBA TBA
1
MUS-155-01
Jazz Ensemble
Pazera C
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
5
ENG-213-01
Creative Writ: Short Fiction
Freeze E
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq ENG-110 or permission of the instructor 1.00
TBA TBA
1
BLS-401-01
Capstone Seminar
Lake T
TBA
TBA - TBA
Take BLS-201; 1.00
TBA TBA
1
BIO-388-03
Independent Study
Bost A
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
MAT-277-02
Special Topics
McKinney C
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
HIS-288-02
Independent Study
Warner R
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
BIO-388-04
Independent Study
Walsh H
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
MUS-298-01
Electronic Music Projects
Renk C
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prereq MUS-221. 0.50
TBA TBA
1
ECO-287-01
Independent Study
Byun C
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
EDU-303-02
Diversity & Multicultural Ed
Seltzer-Kelly D
TBA
TBA - TBA
Recommended EDU-201., Take FRT-101. 0.50
TBA TBA
3
PSC-320-01
Adv Topics Comparativ Politics
Hollander E
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq PSC-121 0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
CHE-488-07
Undergrad Research Experience
Porter L
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
ASI-311-01
Studies in Asian Language
Li Y
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq ASI-301. 1.00
TBA TBA
1
REL-388-01
Independent Study
Blix D
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
CHE-487-01
Undergrad Research Experience
Novak W
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
PSY-288-01
Intermediate Research
Horton R
TBA
TBA - TBA
PSY-201 0.50
TBA TBA
1
PSY-288-02
Intermediate Research
Schmitzer-Torbert N
TBA
TBA - TBA
PSY-201 0.50
TBA TBA
1
THE-388-01
Independent Study
H. Vogel
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
PHY-278-02
Magnetism in Solids
Brown J
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
 
ART-398-02
Website Management
Morton E
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
INT-498-01
Internship
Cherry J
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
 
SPA-277-01
Ecuador
Rogers D
TBA
TBA - TBA
SPA-277: Ecuador. In his evaluation of the first Ecuadorian novel,Cumandáby Juan León Mera, Angel Porras wrote: "The importance of this first narrative model [in Ecuador] resides not only in its status as the country's inaugural novel, but also for having synthesized almost all the themes that constitute the core philosophy of Hispanic American Romanticism." These themes include history and politics. But they also include topics like biology, geography, religion, ethics, and gender. The 2019 Ecuador Program will take as its main focus the country's late colonial and independence periods. We'll use the novel as a virtual starting point to explore all the issues that constitute Hispanic American Romanticism. And then, after our .5 credit course this coming spring, we'll travel together to the country of Ecuador and its capital, Quito, which will become the actual starting point of a journey to retrace the steps of the novel, from the volcanoes above Ambato to the upper reaches of the Amazon rainforest and basin. During the last weeks of May and the first part of June, students will study Spanish at a University in Ecuador, live with host families, and then travel to the Amazon with Wabash faculty and indigenous guides. Prior approval and a completed application are required for this Immersion trip. The course is open to any student not yet in his senior year who has completed at least Spanish 202 prior to the Spring semester. However, preference will be given to applicants who have completed coursework at the 300 level. Immersion trip; Regitsration through instructor only. 0.50
TBA TBA
 
OCS-01-01
Off Campus Study
To be Announced
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA