18/FA Course Faculty Days Comments/Requisites Credits Location Capacity Available Seats
ACC - ACCOUNTING
ACC-201-01
Financial Accounting
Hensley E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
BAX 202
35
ACC-201-02
Financial Accounting
J. Foos
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
GOO 104
30
ART - ART
ART-125-01
Drawing
Mohl D
TU TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
FIN A131
15
ART-140-01
Special Topics in Museum Studi
Morton E
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
ART 140-01: Louis Orr Exhibition In this course, students will develop an exhibition for Spring 2019 of prints by Louis Orr (1877-1966), a renowned American printmaker and uncle of David Orr '57. The exhibition will feature etchings that Louis Orr made while living in France. Students will do research, interpretation, and exhibition design, using American Alliance of Museums standards. They will also create an exhibition catalogue. Prerequisites: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Elizabeth Morton 1.00
FIN A105
8
ART-209-01
Twentieth Century Art
Morton E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
FIN M120
22
ART-210-01
African Art in Hollywood Films
Morton E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ART 210-01: African Art in Hollywood Films This course will look at Hollywood films that feature stories, dress, settings, architecture, and art inspired by Africa. It will look at how visual forms from Africa have been used in such varied films as Black Panther (2018), Coming to America (1988), and Cobra Verde (1987). The focus of the course will be on the original art, architecture, and dress of Africa that is referred to in these films. These African visual forms will be explored as evidence of rituals and beliefs of the various cultural groups that created them. Prerequisites: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Elizabeth Morton 1.00
FIN M140
20
ART-210-02
Rel and Rprsntns of Holocaust
Phillips G
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
REL 295-01 = ART 210-02 = HUM 295-01: Religion and Representations of the Holocaust This course explores a variety of representations of the Holocaust in theology, literature, film, and art. This interdisciplinary course examines the creative and material work of historians, theologians, novelists, poets, graphic novelists, painters, film makers, composers, photographers, and museum architects. The course explores the limits and possibilities of representing atrocity by raising such questions as: Can suffering be represented? What do representations of the Jewish genocide convey to 21st century citizens and subsequent generations of Jews and Christians? Is it barbaric to write poetry and fiction, paint or compose music, film documentaries and TV comedies, draw cartoons and graphic novels, publish photographs or erect monuments about such horrific events? How does visual media facilitate the raising of profound moral and religious questions about the Holocaust and our responses to it? Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Gary Phillips 1.00
CEN 305
20 16 
ART-223-01
Ceramics
Strader A
TU TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
FIN A119
15
ART-224-01
Photography
Weedman M
M W
01:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
FIN A113
15
ART-226-01
Cinematic Envmt: Digital Space
Mohl D
M W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
FIN A133
FIN M120
10
ART-331-01
Advanced Studio
Mohl D
F
01:10PM - 04:00PM
Two credits from ART-125, 126, 223, 224, 225, 227, 228, and 229. At least one credit from the 200 level. 1.00
FIN A124
 
ART-398-01
Independent Study
Weedman M
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
ART-433-01
Senior Studio
Mohl D
F
01:10PM - 04:00PM
ART-330 or 331. 0.50-1.00
FIN A124
 
ASI - ASIAN STUDIES
ASI-196-01
Religion & Literature
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
REL 196-01 = ASI 196-01 = HUM 196-01: Religion and Literature: "Old Pond-Frog Jumps In": Religion in Japanese Literature "Old pond-frog jumps in-sound of water." So runs the famous haiku by Basho. Is it religious? For the Japanese, yes. In Japan religion and art are arguably the same thing. In this course we'll ask how and why. We'll study Japanese ideas about art and religion (e.g. emptiness, solitude, "sublime beauty"), and how they appear in Japanese literature. We'll read selections from Japanese poetry (including haiku), No drama, novels both classic and modern (e.g. The Tale of Genji, Kawabata), and some short stories. For first half-semester at 9:45 TTh, see REL 275-01. Prerequisite: None Credits: 0.5 (Second Half-Semester Course) Instructor: David Blix 0.50
MXI 109
20 16 
ASI-204-01
Music in East Asian Cultures
Makubuya J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
MUS 204-01 = ASI 204-01: Music in East Asian Cultures This is an introductory survey of the music, musical instruments, and their contextual significance in the societies of China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Pakistan. Beyond the instruments and their roles in producing musical sound, this course will examine the significant ceremonies, rites, and rituals enhanced by the music, as a forum for learning about the cultures of these countries. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: James Makubuya 1.00
FIN TGRR
 
ASI-260-01
Topics in Asian History
C. Healey
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
ASI 260-01/01F = HIS 260-01/01F: China's Cultural Revolution In 1966, Mao Zedong declared the start of China's Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, a political and ideological campaign to mobilize China's youth against traditional institutions of all kinds. What followed were ten years of violence and chaos that left an irrevocable mark on Chinese history. This course will consider the causes and legacies of the Cultural Revolution from multiple perspectives. We will study the experiences of individuals from all walks of society as well as how the event has been remembered in a variety of media. Prerequisites: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Cara Healey 1.00
DET 112
15 11 
ASI-260-01F
Topics in Asian History
C. Healey
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION ASI 260-01/01F = HIS 260-01/01F: China's Cultural Revolution In 1966, Mao Zedong declared the start of China's Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, a political and ideological campaign to mobilize China's youth against traditional institutions of all kinds. What followed were ten years of violence and chaos that left an irrevocable mark on Chinese history. This course will consider the causes and legacies of the Cultural Revolution from multiple perspectives. We will study the experiences of individuals from all walks of society as well as how the event has been remembered in a variety of media. Prerequisites: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Cara Healey 1.00
DET 112
5
ASI-277-01
Special Topics
C. Healey
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ASI 277-01 = GEN 277-01 = SOC 277-01: Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary East Asia This course considers a range of themes related to gender and sexuality in China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. While the course will be interdisciplinary by nature, many of the readings and discussions will be rooted in a sociological approach. Potential topics include: marriage, family, femininity, masculinity, fluid gender identities, queer sexualities, sexual practices, family planning, gendered divisions of labor, gender and the state, women's and LGBTQ+ movements, gendered spaces, the commercialization of sex, and media portrayals of gender and sexuality. Prerequisites: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Cara Healey 1.00
DET 111
20 19 
ASI-311-01
Studies in Asian Language
Li Y
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq ASI-301. 1.00
TBA TBA
1
ASI-400-01
Senior Capstone
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
10
BIO - BIOLOGY
BIO-101-01
Human Biology
Ingram A
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq BIO-101L 1.00
HAY 319
32
BIO-101L-01
Human Biology Lab
Ingram A
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-101 0.00
TBA TBA
16
BIO-101L-02
Human Biology Lab
Ingram A
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-101 0.00
TBA TBA
16
BIO-111-01
General Biology I
Burton P, Walsh H, Wetzel E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
Co-Req: BIO-111L 1.00
HAY 104
96 26 
BIO-111L-01
General Biol I Lab
Wetzel E
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-111 0.00
TBA TBA
20
BIO-111L-02
General Biol I Lab
Walsh H
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-111 0.00
TBA TBA
20 -1 
BIO-111L-03
General Biol I Lab
Burton P
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-111 0.00
TBA TBA
20
BIO-111L-04
General Biol I Lab
Burton P
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-111 0.00
TBA TBA
20 -2 
BIO-211-01
Genetics
Sorensen-Kamakian E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PreReq BIO-112, CoReq BIO-211L 1.00
HAY 003
40 11 
BIO-211L-01
Genetics Lab
Sorensen-Kamakian E
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-211, BIO-112 0.00
TBA TBA
20
BIO-211L-02
Genetics Lab
Sorensen-Kamakian E
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-211, BIO-112 0.00
TBA TBA
20
BIO-213-01
Ecology
Carlson B
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PreReq BIO-112, CoReq BIO-213L 1.00
HAY 319
40 29 
BIO-213L-01
Ecology Lab
Carlson B
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-213, BIO-112 0.00
TBA TBA
20 15 
BIO-213L-02
Ecology Lab
Carlson B
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-213, BIO-112 0.00
TBA TBA
20 14 
BIO-226-01
Parasitology
Wetzel E
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
BIO-112, BIO-226L 1.00
HAY 319
16
BIO-226L-01
Parasitology Lab
Wetzel E
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq BIO-226, BIO-112 0.00
TBA TBA
16
BIO-315-01
Organismal Physiology
Walsh H
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
ENROLLMENT BY INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION PRE-Req BIO-212, BIO-315L 1.00
HAY 002
12
BIO-315L-01
Organismal Physiology Lab
Walsh H
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
ENROLLMENT BY INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION CoReq BIO-315 0.00
TBA TBA
12
BIO-371-01
Special Topics
Bost A
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
BIO 371-01: Virology This advanced-level course will explore detailed mechanisms of virus replication and virus-host interactions, with an emphasis on human pathogens. Primary literature will be featured to examine the most current understandings of the strategies of several viruses and their global health implications. This course counts toward the biology major, biology minor, or global health minor as an elective, non-lab science. Prerequisites: BIO 211 and BIO 212 Credits: 1 Instructor: Anne Bost BIO-212 1.00
HAY 001
12
BIO-401-01
Senior Seminar
Burton P, Carlson B, Sorensen-Kamakian E
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
1.00
HAY 001
HAY 003
22
BLS - BLACK STUDIES
BLS-270-01
Special Topics:lit/Fine Arts
Pouille A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FRE 312-01 = ENG 370-01 = BLS 270-01: African Film This course will study the evolution of African cinema since 1950. Traditionally dominated by the celluloid film, known for its sobering representations of Africa, the African cinematic landscape has recently witnessed the rise of the video film, generally characterized by a more aggrandizing portrayal of local cultures and communities. While analyzing the generic differences between these two types of films, we will also examine their appeal among African and international audiences. Furthermore, we will consider and reflect on the nexus points between African orality especially African myths and legends, and several contemporary issues among which immigration, globalization, gender relations, identity formation and modernity. Our primary resources will be films produced by acclaimed directors hailing from Cameroon, Senegal, Burkina Faso, Morocco, Egypt, Mali, Nigeria, South Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo. This course will be offered in English, however French students will submit all writing assignments in French. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Adrien Pouille 1.00
DET 212
20 14 
BLS-300-01
Special Topics
Lake T
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ENG 497-02 = BLS 300-01 1.00
LIB LSEM
15 14 
BUS - BUSINESS
BUS-400-01
Senior Capstone
Howland F
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
0.00
BAX 114
30
CHE - CHEMISTRY
CHE-101-01
Survey of Chemistry
Schmitt P, Teitgen A
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
CHE 101-01 = CHE 101-01F CoReq CHE-101L 1.00
HAY 319
52
CHE-101-01F
Survey of Chemistry
Schmitt P, Teitgen A
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
CHE 101-01 = CHE 101-01F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION CoReq CHE-101L 1.00
HAY 319
8
CHE-101L-01
Survey Chemistry Lab
A. Teitgen
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CHE 101L-01 = CHE 101L-01F CoReq CHE-101 0.00
TBA TBA
17
CHE-101L-01F
Survey Chemistry Lab
Teitgen A
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CHE 101L-01 = CHE 101L-01F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION CoReq CHE-101 0.00
TBA TBA
3
CHE-101L-02
Survey Chemistry Lab
Teitgen a
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CHE 101L-02 = CHE 101L-02F CoReq CHE-101 0.00
TBA TBA
18
CHE-101L-02F
Survey Chemistry Lab
Teitgen a
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CHE 101L-02 = CHE 101L-02F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION CoReq CHE-101 0.00
TBA TBA
2
CHE-101L-03
Survey Chemistry Lab
Schmitt P
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CHE 101L-03 = CHE 101L-03F CoReq CHE-101 0.00
TBA TBA
17
CHE-101L-03F
Survey Chemistry Lab
Schmitt P
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CHE 101L-03 = CHE 101L-03F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION CoReq CHE-101 0.00
TBA TBA
3
CHE-111-01
General Chemistry I
Porter L, Novak W, Taylor A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CHE 111-01 = CHE 111-01F CoReq CHE-111L 1.00
HAY 002
25
CHE-111-02
General Chemistry I
Porter L, Novak W, Taylor A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CHE 111-01 = CHE 111-01F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION CoReq CHE-111L 1.00
HAY 104
40 11 
CHE-111L-01
General Chemistry Lab
Taylor A
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CHE 111L-01 = CHE 111L-01F CoReq CHE-111 0.00
TBA TBA
8
CHE-111L-01F
General Chemistry Lab
Taylor A
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CHE 111L-01 = CHE 111L-01F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION CoReq CHE-111 0.00
TBA TBA
12
CHE-111L-02
General Chemistry Lab
Porter L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CHE 111L-02 = CHE 111L-02F CoReq CHE-111 0.00
TBA TBA
8
CHE-111L-02F
General Chemistry Lab
Porter L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CHE 111L-02 = CHE 111L-02F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION CoReq CHE-111 0.00
TBA TBA
12
CHE-111L-03
General Chemistry Lab
Novak W
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CHE 111L-03 = CHE 111L-03F CoReq CHE-111 0.00
TBA TBA
8
CHE-111L-03F
General Chemistry Lab
Novak W
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CHE 111L-03 = CHE 111L-03F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION CoReq CHE-111 0.00
TBA TBA
12
CHE-111L-04
General Chemistry Lab
Taylor A
TH
08:00AM - 11:00AM
CoReq CHE-111 0.00
TBA TBA
10
CHE-171-01
Special Topics
Novak W
M F
01:10PM - 04:00PM
0.50
TBA TBA
15 14 
CHE-221-01
Organic Chemistry I
Wysocki L
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq CHE-111, CoReq CHE-221L 1.00
HAY 319
48 22 
CHE-221L-01
Organic Chem I Lab
Wysocki L
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-221, CHE-111 0.00
TBA TBA
16
CHE-221L-02
Organic Chem I Lab
Wysocki L
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-221, CHE-111 0.00
TBA TBA
16 11 
CHE-221L-03
Organic Chem I Lab
A. Teitgen
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-221, CHE-111 0.00
TBA TBA
16
CHE-351-01
Physical Chem I
Schmitt P
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq CHE-211 or 241 and MAT-112 and PHY-112, CoReq CHE-351L 1.00
HAY 001
15
CHE-351L-01
Physical Chem I Lab
Schmitt P
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-351, CHE-211 MAT-112 PHY-112 0.00
TBA TBA
15
CHE-421-01
Adv. Topics in Organic Chem.
Wysocki L
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
CHE 421-01: Advanced Organic Chemistry (Organic Chemistry of Dyes) This course will take a deeper look at one application of the fundamental concepts and reactivity learned in Organic Chemistry: dyes. From textiles to medicine to cutting-edge experiments using fluorescence, organic dyes are chemical tools with a long and fruitful history. This course will focus on the organic chemistry of designing, synthesizing, and using dyes, and will engage with primary literature. Prerequisite: CHE 321 Credits: 0.5 (First Half-Semester Course) Instructor: Laura Wysocki CHE-321 0.50
HAY 003
12
CHE-441-01
Adv Inorganic Chem
Porter L
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PreReq CHE-211 and 351, CoReq CHE-441L 1.00
HAY 321
15
CHE-441L-01
Adv Inorganic Chem Lab
Porter L
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHE-441 0.00
TBA TBA
15
CHE-461-01
Adv. Topics in Biochemistry
Novak W
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
Advanced Protein Structure This course will build on basic biochemical principles and apply them to protein structure. Topics include: protein crystallization, X-ray diffraction, building protein structures into electron density, and a survey of protein design. Students will learn to build, assess, and correct problematic protein structures. Prerequisite: None Credits: 0.5 (Second Half-Semester Course) Instructor: Walter Novak 0.50
HAY 321
15
CHE-462-01
Advanced Biochemistry
Novak W
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PreReq CHE-361 0.50
HAY 321
15 12 
CHE-487-01
Undergrad Research Experience
Feller S
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
 
CHE-487-02
Undergrad Research Experience
Novak W
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
 
CHE-487-03
Undergrad Research Experience
Schmitt P
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1 -1 
CHE-487-04
Undergrad Research Experience
Teitgen A
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
CHE-487-05
Undergrad Research Experience
Taylor A
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
2
CHE-487-06
Undergrad Research Experience
Wysocki L
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
 
CHI - CHINESE
CHI-101-01
Elementary Chinese I
Li Y
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
CoReq CHI-101L; 1.00
DET 211
15
CHI-101L-01
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHI-101. 0.00
DET 112
5
CHI-101L-02
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq CHI-101. 0.00
DET 211
5
CHI-101L-03
Elementary Chinese I Lab
Staff
F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHI-101. 0.00
DET 112
5
CHI-201-01
Intermediate Chinese I
Healey C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PreReq ASI-102 or CHI-201 placement., PreReq ASI-102 or CHI-201 placement. 1.00
DET 112
10
CHI-201L-01
Intermediate Chinese I Lab
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq CHI-201., CHI-102 0.00
DET 112
5
CHI-201L-02
Intermediate Chinese I Lab
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq CHI-201., CHI-102 0.00
DET 211
5
CHI-301L-01
Conversation & Composition Lab
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
CoReq CHI-301., CHI-202 0.00
TBA TBA
5
CHI-301L-02
Conversation & Composition Lab
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
CoReq CHI-301., CHI-202 0.00
TBA TBA
5
CHI-311-01
Studies in Chinese Language
Li Y
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq CHI-301 or CHI-311 placement., CoReq CHI-311L. 1.00
DET 220
18 18 
CHI-311L-01
Studies in Chinese Lang Lab
Li Y
TBA
TBA - TBA
Take CHI-311. 0.00
DET 220
18 18 
CLA - CLASSICS
CLA-105-01
Ancient Greece
Wickkiser B
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CLA 105-01 = HIS 211-01 CLA 105-01 = HIS 310-01 1.00
HAY 319
50 17 
CLA-211-01
Special Topics
Kubiak D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
CLA 211-01 = ENG 270-02: Virgil's Aeneid This class will be an intensive literary and historical study of Virgil's epic the Aeneid, which after the Bible has been the most consistently influential book in the western canon. The poem will be read in translation, but the class is also intended for students of Latin who have not been able to read extensively in the original text. We will examine the literary traditions in which the Aeneid stands, Virgil's very particular aesthetic orientation, and the historical and cultural developments in Rome that influenced the composition of the poem. Explication of the text itself will be the main focus of the course, but there will also be readings from modern scholars representing different interpretative approaches. Finally, we will take up the question of the Aeneid's influence in later European literature, and will read the Inferno of Dante's Divina Commedia entire. Prerequisite: One CLA credit Credits: 1 Instructor: David Kubiak 1.00
DET 220
 
CLA-240-01
Ancient Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CLA 240-01 = PHI 240-01 1.00
DET 209
30 25 
CLA-287-01
Independent Study
Hartnett J
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1 -2 
COL - COLLOQUIUM
COL-401-01
Important Books
Blix D, McKinney C
W
07:30PM - 09:00PM
1.00
CEN 304
15
CSC - COMPUTER SCIENCE
CSC-111-01
Intro to Programming
Turner W
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PreReq CSC-101 or MAT 112; or permission of the instructor 1.00
GOO 101
24
CSC-111-02
Intro to Programming
Turner W
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PreReq CSC-101 or MAT 112; or permission of the instructor 1.00
GOO 101
24 18 
CSC-121-01
Intro to Add. Program Language
Turner W
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CSC 121-01: Programming in Python This is a half-credit introduction to the Python programming language for students who already have some programming experience. Students will build on their previous knowledge of a programming language to learn an additional language. Python is a multi-paradigm programming language similar in some respects to Java and C++, but different in others. Prerequisite: CSC 111 or permission of the instructor Credits: 0.5 (First Half-Semester Course) Instructor: William Turner PreReq CSC-111 with a grade of C- or better. 0.50
GOO 101
24 12 
CSC-121-02
Intro to Add. Program Language
Turner W
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CSC 121-02: Programming in R This is a half-credit introduction to the R programming language for students who already have some programming experience. Students will build on their previous knowledge of a programming language to learn an additional language. R is widely used by statisticians, and it has stronger object-oriented programming facilities than most statistical computing languages. However, at its core, R is a functional programming language, which is very different from object-oriented languages like Java and C++. Prerequisite: CSC 111 or permission of the instructor Credits: 0.5 (Second Half-Semester Course) Instructor: William Turner PreReq CSC-111 with a grade of C- or better. 0.50
GOO 101
24 15 
CSC-171-01
Special Topics in Comp. Sci.
McKinney C
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
CSC-337-01
Intro. Numerical Analysis
Poffald E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
CSC 337-01 = MAT 337-01 CSC-111 and MAT-223 1.00
GOO 101
24 23 
DV3 - DIVISION III
DV3-252-01
Stats Soc Sciences
Byun C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
0.50
BAX 214
30
DV3-252-02
Stats Soc Sciences
Byun C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
0.50
BAX 214
30 11 
ECO - ECONOMICS
ECO-101-01
Princ of Economics
E. Dunaway
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
ECO 101-01 = ECO 101-01F 1.00
HAY 002
20
ECO-101-01F
Princ of Economics
E. Dunaway
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
ECO 101-01 = ECO 101-01F FRESHMEN SECTION ONLY 1.00
HAY 002
5
ECO-101-02
Princ of Economics
E. Dunaway
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
ECO 101-02 = ECO 101-02F 1.00
BAX 202
20
ECO-101-02F
Princ of Economics
E. Dunaway
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
ECO 101-02 = ECO 101-02F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
BAX 202
5
ECO-101-03
Princ of Economics
Mikek P
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
BAX 202
25
ECO-213-01
Topics in Econ History:U S
Burnette J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
ECO-101 1.00
BAX 311
30 10 
ECO-220-01
The Global Economy
Saha S
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
ECO-101 1.00
BAX 214
30
ECO-232-01
Public Policy
E. Dunaway
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
ECO-101 1.00
BAX 311
30 21 
ECO-251-01
Economic Approach With Excel
Howland F
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
ECO-101 0.50
BAX 214
30
ECO-251-02
Economic Approach With Excel
Howland F
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
ECO-101 0.50
BAX 214
30 -1 
ECO-287-01
Independent Study
Mikek P
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
2 -1 
ECO-287-02
Independent Study
Byun C
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
2
ECO-291-01
Intermediate Micro
Byun C
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PreReq ECO-101 with a C- or better and MAT-110 or 111 with a C- or better. 1.00
BAX 114
20
ECO-291-02
Intermediate Micro
Burnette J
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PreReq ECO-101 with a C- or better and MAT-110 or 111 with a C- or better. 1.00
BAX 201
20
ECO-292-01
Intermediate Macro
Mikek P
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq ECO-101 with a C- or better and MAT-110 or 111 with a C- or better. 1.00
BAX 202
30 11 
ECO-321-01
International Trade
Saha S
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
ECO-251, 253, and ECO-291 1.00
BAX 214
25 11 
ECO-361-01
Corporate Finance
Howland F
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PreReq ECO-251, 253, and 291 1.00
HAY 319
25
ECO-362-01
Money and Banking
Mikek P
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PreReq ECO-253 and 292 with a minimum grade of C-. 1.00
BAX 311
25
ECO-401-01
Senior Seminar
Saha S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PreReq ECO-251 ,253, 291, and 292 1.00
BAX 214
17
ECO-401-02
Senior Seminar
Howland F
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PreReq ECO-251 ,253, 291, and 292 1.00
BAX 214
17
EDU - EDUCATION
EDU-101-01
Intro Child & Adolescent Devel
Pittard M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
EDU 101-01 = EDU 101-01F 1.00
DET 209
18
EDU-101-01F
Intro Child & Adolescent Devel
Pittard M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
EDU 101-01 = EDU 101-01F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
DET 209
2
EDU-201-01
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
EDU 201-01 = MAS 201-01 = PHI 299-01 Take Freshmen Tutorial. 1.00
DET 111
18
EDU-202-01
MS Methods & Literacy
Pittard M
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PreReq EDU-101. 1.00
DET 111
10
EDU-202-02
MS Methods & Literacy
Pittard M
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PreReq EDU-101. 0.50
DET 111
10
EDU-203-01
YA Development
Pittard M
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PreReq EDU-101. 0.50
DET 111
10
EDU-230-01
Special Topics in Education
Pittard M
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
EDU 230-01 = ENG 270-01: Young Adult Literature According to Time Magazine, "We're living in a golden age of young adult literature." So, what influence do such popular characters as J. K. Rowling's, Harry Potter and John Green's, Hazel Grace Lancaster have on the development of young adolescents as people and as life-long readers? This course offers an introduction to young adult literature, with a focus on adolescent development and literacy. Critical literacy skills are taught and practiced as students read and analyze a variety of subgenres within YA literature (e.g., fantasy, historical fiction, and contemporary fiction). Prerequisite: None Credits: 0.5 (Second Half-Semester Course) Instructor: Michele Pittard 0.50
MXI 214
10
EDU-240-01
Educational Policy & Eval
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
EDU 240-01 = PSC 210-01 Take FRT-101. 1.00
DET 112
18
EDU-314-01
Theory and Practice of Peer Tu
Koppelmann Z
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
ENG 314-01 = EDU 314-01 Take FRT-101 and FRC-101. 1.00
BAX 312
10
EDU-370-01
Special Topics
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
EDU 370-01 = HIS 240-01: Social Studies Education for Democratic Citizenship This course takes a "difficult questions" approach to explore the ways in which social studies education in the U.S. must grapple with complex historic content--and sometimes fails to do so adequately. Topics explored include: history curriculum related to immigrant history, slavery, and indigenous peoples; geography approaches such as critical geography to focus upon power relationships; and instruction in U.S. government and economy including the history and nature of social contract, separation of powers, and individual rights and freedoms. Prerequisite: None Credits: 0.5 (First Half-Semester Course) Instructor: Deborah Seltzer-Kelly Take 1 credit from department EDU or HIS at the 200 level or above., Take FRT-101. 0.50
DET 220
10
EDU-370-02
Special Topics
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
EDU 370-02 = HIS 240-02: Science Education for Democratic Citizenship This course explores the history and dilemmas of U.S. educational approaches to science literacy during the 20th and early 21st centuries. Topics include: constructions of the nature of scientific method; recurring dilemmas such as evolution and global warming; and ways in which notions of science literacy itself are understood and discussed in governmental and educational policy and institutions. Prerequisite: None Credits: 0.5 (Second Half-Semester Course) Instructor: Deborah Seltzer-Kelly Take 1 credit from department EDU or HIS at the 200 level or above., Take FRT-101. 0.50
DET 220
10
EDU-388-01
Independent Study
Ingram A
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
EDU-401-01
Content Methods:Language Arts
Pittard M
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
PreReq EDU-101,201, and 202 0.50
MXI 213
10
EDU-404-01
Content Method:Social Studies
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
PreReq EDU-101,201, and 202. 0.50
DET 220
5
EDU-423-01
Student Teaching Practicum
Pittard M, A. Phillips
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReqEDU-101,201,202,302,330. 0.5 credits from EDU-401,402, 403,404 3.00
TBA TBA
 
ENG - ENGLISH
ENG-101-01
Composition
Freeze E
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
1.00
CEN 300
15
ENG-101-02
Composition
Brewer A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
CEN 305
15
ENG-101-03
Composition
Benedicks C
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
CEN 305
15
ENG-101-04
Composition
Mong D
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
CEN 305
15
ENG-101-05
Composition
Aikens N
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
CEN 304
15
ENG-101-06
Composition
Freeze, R
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00
CEN 300
15 -1 
ENG-101-07
Composition
M. Lambert
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
CEN 300
15
ENG-105-01
Intro to Poetry
N. Aikens
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
0.50
CEN 300
20 10 
ENG-106-01
Intro. to Short Fiction
Aikens N
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
0.50
CEN 300
20
ENG-108-01
History and Novel
M. Lambert
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
HAY 002
30 26 
ENG-110-01
Intro. to Creative Writing
Freeze E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ENG 110-01 = ENG 110-01F 1.00
LIB LGL
25
ENG-110-01F
Intro. to Creative Writing
Freeze E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ENG 110-01 = ENG 110-01F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
LIB LGL
10
ENG-180-01
Special Topics
Benedicks C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
ENG 180-01 = GEN 270-01: Extraordinary Bodies in Literature and Film We will study literary and filmic representations of bodies that exceed, fall short of, confound, or otherwise problematize "normal" selves. This includes representations of athletes, disabled people, superheroes, pregnant or nursing people, transgender or intersex people, and monsters/mythic creatures of all varieties. All levels of experience welcome. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Crystal Benedicks 1.00
CEN 215
30 13 
ENG-202-01
Writing With Power and Grace
M. Lambert
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
CEN 305
15
ENG-202-02
Writing With Power and Grace
Aikens N
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
CEN 215
6
ENG-202-02F
Writing With Power and Grace
Aikens N
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
CEN 215
9
ENG-213-01
Creative Writ: Short Fiction
Freeze E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PreReq ENG-110 or permission of the instructor 1.00
CEN 216
15
ENG-216-01
Intro to Shakespeare
Aikens N
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
ENG-219-01
Amer Lit before 1900
Mong D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
CEN 215
30 17 
ENG-270-01
Special Topics: Lit/Fine Arts
Pittard M
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
EDU 230-01 = ENG 270-01: Young Adult Literature According to Time Magazine, "We're living in a golden age of young adult literature." So, what influence do such popular characters as J. K. Rowling's, Harry Potter; Sherman Alexie's, Arnold Spirit; and John Green's, Hazel Grace Lancaster have on the development of young adolescents as people and as life-long readers? This course offers an introduction to young adult literature, with a focus on adolescent development and literacy. Critical literacy skills are taught and practiced as students read and analyze a variety of subgenres within YA literature (e.g., fantasy, historical fiction, and contemporary fiction). Prerequisite: None Credits: 0.5 (Second Half-Semester Course) Instructor: Michele Pittard 0.50
MXI 214
10
ENG-270-02
Special Topics: Lit/Fine Arts
Kubiak D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
CLA 211-01 = ENG 270-02: Virgil's Aeneid This class will be an intensive literary and historical study of Virgil's epic the Aeneid, which after the Bible has been the most consistently influential book in the western canon. The poem will be read in translation, but the class is also intended for students of Latin who have not been able to read extensively in the original text. We will examine the literary traditions in which the Aeneid stands, Virgil's very particular aesthetic orientation, and the historical and cultural developments in Rome that influenced the composition of the poem. Explication of the text itself will be the main focus of the course, but there will also be readings from modern scholars representing different interpretative approaches. Finally, we will take up the question of the Aeneid's influence in later European literature, and will read the Inferno of Dante's Divina Commedia entire. Prerequisite: One CLA credit Credits: 1 Instructor: David Kubiak 1.00
DET 220
 
ENG-297-01
Intro to the Study of Lit
Brewer A
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
CEN 215
30 17 
ENG-310-01
Studies in Literary Genres
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
THE 212-01/01F = ENG 310-01/01F: The Revolutionary Stage NOTE: This class was formerly called "History and Literature of the Theatre II: The French Renaissance to the Rise of Realism" This class will delve into the history of the theatre and its various dramatic literatures in Europe between the years 1660-1900. The course ranges from the witty banterings of Molière and Behn to the realism of Ibsen and Strindberg to the apocalyptic trance of Alfred Jarry. We will discuss the "new woman," the rise of industrialism and cosmopolitanism, and a society shifting under the influence and pressure of the purveyors of new modes of thought-Hegel, Darwin, Nietzsche, Zola. This is a class about the coming of the "new," revolution and counterrevolution, the calms and the storms. The plays in this course will be discussed as instruments for theatrical production; as examples of dramatic structure, style, and genre; and, most importantly, as they reflect the moral, social, and political issues of their time. This course is appropriate for freshmen. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: James Cherry 1.00
FIN TGRR
12
ENG-310-01F
Studies in Literary Genres
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION THE 212-01/01F = ENG 310-01/01F: The Revolutionary Stage NOTE: This class was formerly called "History and Literature of the Theatre II: The French Renaissance to the Rise of Realism" This class will delve into the history of the theatre and its various dramatic literatures in Europe between the years 1660-1900. The course ranges from the witty banterings of Molière and Behn to the realism of Ibsen and Strindberg to the apocalyptic trance of Alfred Jarry. We will discuss the "new woman," the rise of industrialism and cosmopolitanism, and a society shifting under the influence and pressure of the purveyors of new modes of thought-Hegel, Darwin, Nietzsche, Zola. This is a class about the coming of the "new," revolution and counterrevolution, the calms and the storms. The plays in this course will be discussed as instruments for theatrical production; as examples of dramatic structure, style, and genre; and, most importantly, as they reflect the moral, social, and political issues of their time. This course is appropriate for freshmen. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: James Cherry 1.00
FIN TGRR
3
ENG-314-01
Theory and Practice of Peer Tu
Koppelmann Z
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
ENG 314-01 = EDU 314-01 Take FRT-101 and FRC-101. 1.00
BAX 312
10
ENG-370-01
Special Topics: Lit/Fine Arts
Pouille A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FRE 312-01 = ENG 370-01 = BLS 270-01: African Film This course will study the evolution of African cinema since 1950. Traditionally dominated by the celluloid film, known for its sobering representations of Africa, the African cinematic landscape has recently witnessed the rise of the video film, generally characterized by a more aggrandizing portrayal of local cultures and communities. While analyzing the generic differences between these two types of films, we will also examine their appeal among African and international audiences. Furthermore, we will consider and reflect on the nexus points between African orality especially African myths and legends, and several contemporary issues among which immigration, globalization, gender relations, identity formation and modernity. Our primary resources will be films produced by acclaimed directors hailing from Cameroon, Senegal, Burkina Faso, Morocco, Egypt, Mali, Nigeria, South Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo. This course will be offered in English, however French students will submit all writing assignments in French. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Adrien Pouille 1 credit from ENG at Wabash. 1.00
DET 212
20 19 
ENG-388-01
Independent Study/Lit Fine Art
Mong D
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
ENG-411-01
Bus & Tech Writing
Koppelmann Z
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Take FRC. Must be a junior or a senior. 1.00
BAX 312
15
ENG-497-01
Seminar in English Lit
Mong D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
ENG 497-01: Emily Dickinson and Lyric Theory She only wore white. She loved her father's best friend. She never left her home. She baked prize-winning bread. She sent letters to a "Master." She got kicked out of school. In this seminar we'll explore these and other myths about Emily Dickinson by reading from her 1,789 poems, her letters, and the small booklets she produced-commonly called "fascicles"-from 1858-64. We'll examine her contemporaries, including Longfellow (whose novella she hid in a piano bench), Emerson (whom she met), and Whitman ("I never read his Book-but was told that he was disgraceful.") We'll explore marriage, the church, the Civil War, her family, democracy, and her dog Carlo. We'll ask why do so many 20th century male writers turn her into an object of desire? Students will spend the semester writing a final paper that will demonstrate their ability to do original research and to articulate their definition of lyric poetry. "If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry," Dickinson once wrote, offering a uniquely visceral description of verse. She then added: "Is there any other way[?]" We'll find out by studying various critical lens: textual studies, formalism, reception studies, and what has come to be called the New Lyric Studies. We'll become very good at reading short, beautiful poems. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Derek Mong 1.00
CEN 300
15
ENG-497-02
Seminar in English Lit
Lake T
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
ENG 497-02 = BLS 300-01 1.00
LIB LSEM
15 11 
ENG-498-01
Capstone Portfolio
Mong D
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq ENG-311, 312, or 313 0.50
TBA TBA
 
FRE - FRENCH
FRE-101-01
Elementary French I
Quandt K
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
CoReq FRE-101L 1.00
DET 209
18
FRE-101L-01
Elementary French 1 Lab
Staff
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq FRE-101 0.00
DET 111
6
FRE-101L-02
Elementary French 1 Lab
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq FRE-101 0.00
DET 211
6
FRE-101L-03
Elementary French 1 Lab
Staff
TU
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CoReq FRE-101 0.00
DET 211
6
FRE-201-01
Intermediate French
Pouille A
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PreReq FRE-102 or FRE-201 placement, CoReq FRE-201L 1.00
DET 226
18
FRE-201L-01
Intermediate French Lab.
Staff
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
FRE-201 0.00
DET 211
6
FRE-201L-02
Intermediate French Lab.
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
FRE-201 0.00
DET 211
6
FRE-201L-03
Intermediate French Lab.
Staff
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FRE-201 0.00
DET 111
6
FRE-301-01
Conversation & Composition
K. Quandt
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
PreReq FRE-202 or FRE-301 placement 1.00
DET 226
10
FRE-312-01
Studies in French Culture
Pouille A
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FRE 312-01 = ENG 370-01 = BLS 270-01: African Film This course will study the evolution of African cinema since 1950. Traditionally dominated by the celluloid film, known for its sobering representations of Africa, the African cinematic landscape has recently witnessed the rise of the video film, generally characterized by a more aggrandizing portrayal of local cultures and communities. While analyzing the generic differences between these two types of films, we will also examine their appeal among African and international audiences. Furthermore, we will consider and reflect on the nexus points between African orality especially African myths and legends, and several contemporary issues among which immigration, globalization, gender relations, identity formation and modernity. Our primary resources will be films produced by acclaimed directors hailing from Cameroon, Senegal, Burkina Faso, Morocco, Egypt, Mali, Nigeria, South Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo. This course will be offered in English, however French students will submit all writing assignments in French. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Adrien Pouille 1.00
DET 212
20 17 
FRE-401-01
Senior Seminar in French
Quandt K
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
TBA TBA
5
FRT - FRESHMAN TUTORIALS
FRT-101-01
Freshman Tutorial
Abbott M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
The Western: An American Film Genre Michael Abbott teaches Theater, Film, and Interactive Media at Wabash. He is on a mission to help designers build video games that make a difference. The Western is the American mirror. It is the essential folklore and collective dream of American culture, reflecting our greatest hopes and darkest fears, deeply rooted in American cultural mythology. This course will examine the Western as a distinctive film genre, tracing its origins in literature and Wild West shows and analyzing its evolution from the silent era to today. Among the films to be screened and examined are: The Great Train Robbery, Stagecoach, The Searchers, High Noon, Rio Bravo, The Wild Bunch, Unforgiven, Tombstone, No Country for Old Men, Django Unchained, and The Revenant. We will also consider Western genre literature (The Ox-Bow Incident, All the Pretty Horses) and examine its relationship to Western film as a storytelling medium. 1.00
GOO 006
16
FRT-101-02
Freshman Tutorial
Bost A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
How Health Can Change the World Anne Bost, a Biologist, enjoys hiking, reading, and brainstorming about the invisible lives of microbes. Do you ever wonder what our world would be like if every person were healthy and had access to clean drinking water? In our tutorial, we will contemplate the intricate historical and modern linkages between human health and sociopolitical, economic, and cultural development. Using case studies, we will apply multiple liberal arts lenses to consider how best to address global (including local) crises. What does it mean to think critically, lead effectively, act responsibly, and live humanely in an inequitable world? What might we dare to dream, and to do? 1.00
HAY 002
16
FRT-101-03
Freshman Tutorial
Bost P
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
The Automobile and American Culture Preston Bost teaches Psychology, is an avid runner and sports fan, and owns a minivan that he imagines trading in for a Corvette someday. In September 1893 brothers Charles and Frank Duryea tested what was to become America's first commercially produced gasoline-powered automobile, the Duryea Motor Wagon. The Motor Wagon was not fast, or agile, or commercially successful, but the Duryea brothers recognized the potential for the automobile to capture the imagination - and money - of American consumers. Within ten years, over one hundred companies were producing automobiles, racing competitions were popular events, and the era of the horse-drawn carriage was effectively over. Over one hundred years later, Americans' infatuation with the automobile is as intense as ever; this course is about how the entire landscape of American life - work, relationships, finances, and popular culture, to name a few - is shaped by our collective relationship with cars. Over the course of the semester, we will examine the automobile from a wide variety of angles. How are cars designed, produced, advertised, and consumed? What effect has the automobile had on the shape of cities and their architecture? What is the role of automobile production in the nation's economy and the lives of its workers? How has the automobile impacted the lives of women? How does the depiction of automobiles in popular culture capture our ideals and aspirations? Why does driving still get so many people killed, and how can we solve that problem? What will future cars look like and why? How did Indiana become a hotbed of automotive production in the early 20th century, and how did it lose that status? .and how would your life change if you were not able to use a car? 1.00
BAX 301
16
FRT-101-04
Freshman Tutorial
Byun C
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Fashion, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship: How to Dress Like a Gentleman in the 21st Century Christie Byun teaches Economics and in her spare time she enjoys yoga, knitting, slacklining, and rock climbing. How you dress is a reflection of who you are. Whether you wear a hoodie or a power suit, you're making a fashion statement. And unless you wear nothing at all (which is a fashion statement in its own right!), it's a statement you make every day. If you look around, fashion is everywhere-in politics, sports, music, religion, and business. People use fashion to express creativity, pursue anonymity, or stick it to the Man. Fashion may be the ultimate embodiment of democracy since everyone can use it for free expression and creativity. This course is about fashion in all its forms. From the cotton grown in fields half a world away to the t-shirts we buy at the local mall, fashion is a multi-billion dollar global industry with designers, entrepreneurs, counterfeiters, and ordinary consumers. We will see how the production, consumption, and ultimately the disposal of fashion items has made this industry one of the most important in the world. This course may appeal to anyone with an interest in economics, politics, music, science, or art. 1.00
BAX 201
16
FRT-101-05
Freshman Tutorial
Hartnett J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Caesar Builds Wabash: How Ancient Rome Can Help Us Design Our Next Campus Center Jeremy Hartnett teaches archaeology, history, and Latin in the Classics department; when he's not traveling to Italy, conducting research, cooking, or hanging out with his family, he's usually playing in the Wabash Pep Band. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill famously said, "We shape our buildings; and afterwards our buildings shape us." Taking a cue from Churchill, this tutorial is concerned with how architecture affects the ways people interact, both in the past and the present, both in the ancient world and in the modern US. Along the way, in order to test-drive our ideas, we will try our hand at designing a new structure for Wabash's campus. The raw material for our exploration will come from the Romans, a society that was obsessed with using buildings to unify, divide, and separate groups of people. Structures like the Colosseum, for example, herded different social classes through specific entrances and then into different levels of seating. The result was a space where society was literally stratified, as few senators rubbed elbows with the common rabble. By contrast, Rome's huge public baths removed many of these barriers, and, with everyone stripped down amid resplendent surroundings, even the lowliest plebs might feel on equal footing with fancy folk. Examining houses from Pompeii will add more techniques to our analytical toolkit, which we'll employ as we turn our attention to our own campus and assess how its buildings draw our community together or serve to separate it. How, for example, might the layout of a dormitory, a fraternity house, a library, or an academic building help or hinder social interactions? This work will set the stage for the last portion of the term, when we will assume the role of designers and architects to contemplate possibilities for a new Wabash campus center. What practical needs should such a building serve? How might this structure shape our college community for the better? On the basis of interviews, surveys, field trips, meetings with practicing architects, and their own ingenuity and creativity, students will create and present virtual designs for the building as their final project in the course. 1.00
DET 128
16
FRT-101-06
Freshman Tutorial
Himsel S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
The Adventures of Teddy Roosevelt - Lessons in Leadership, Character and Living Large Scott Himsel is a lawyer who teaches political science and loves hearing both sides of a good argument. Teddy Roosevelt led the charge up San Juan Hill. And later as President, he protected our national interests by frequently threatening military action. But we did not fire a single shot against a foreign power during his Presidency. Indeed, TR won the Nobel Peace Prize. Although he strongly believed in private enterprise, TR took on big business to protect competition and the rights of labor. TR loved to hunt and wanted to develop our natural resources. But he was also our most vigorous environmentalist, saving hundreds of millions of acres from development including treasures like the Grand Canyon. How did TR do all of these things at the same time? How was TR so versatile when our leaders today seem unable even to understand other points of view? How did TR use the media to unite the nation when today's leaders seem unable even to reach across the political aisle? We will study TR's adventures not only to understand his times, but also to seek wisdom we need to deal with our challenges today both at home and abroad. Beyond politics, we will also explore how TR's extremely wide ranging interests and his childlike zest for play and adventure made his amazing achievements possible. 1.00
BAX 212
16
FRT-101-07
Freshman Tutorial
Horton R
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Using Failure to Find Your Happy Place Bobby Horton teaches psychology, coaches soccer, and spends any free time he has carting kids to and from swimming pools and soccer fields. Where is your happy place? What is success to you, and how do you work towards it? We all want success, but it is not always clear what success really is, or should be, or what is the best path to get to it. In this class we will explore our own and others' notions of failure and success and the possible link between the two. We will read a variety of texts from multiple different genres - from Shakespeare's plays to contemporary memoirs to scientific articles - that reflect different ideas about failure and success. Among the texts we may consider are Mindset (by Carol Dweck), MacBeth (by Shakespeare), and What Made Maddy Run? (by Kate Fagan), and we will talk to community members, both Wabash folks and those from the Crawfordsville community, about their pursuit of success and their use of failure in its service. And in the end, we may find that, instead of being its opposite, failure is often a critical step towards the success we should most want to achieve. 1.00
BAX 311
16
FRT-101-08
Freshman Tutorial
Ingram A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Culture, Criticism, and Cartoons: Publishing Like a New Yorker Amanda Ingram has been teaching at Wabash for 14 years and is a botanist, a native of Virginia, a devoted fan of Wabash basketball, and a dedicated reader of The New Yorker. Are you interested in politics, science, sports, business, the arts, humor, food, or personal histories? Then this is the tutorial for you! The New Yorker is a weekly magazine known for its brilliant writing, wide-ranging coverage, and amusing (if sometimes mystifying) cartoons, and we'll spend the semester reading articles, analyzing them to understand how great writing is constructed, and discussing whatever fascinating content the magazine sends our way. Students will write a range of articles in The New Yorker style, including gossipy "Talk of the Town" pieces, personal histories, criticism, and news commentary, culminating in a Wabash College-focused magazine of our own. 1.00
HAY 321
16
FRT-101-09
Freshman Tutorial
Lake T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
We Are the world: Multi-ethnic America Tim Lake teaches English and is a member of the Wabash Center of Theology and Religion. This course will introduce students to the field of ethnic studies. We will survey American history with a focus on the many peoples and cultures that comprise the U.S. population. Attention will also be given to contemporary issues we face as a diverse society and how our diversity both strengthens and threatens our democratic ambitions. Students will chart their family histories as it unfolds into the larger story we tell about the U.S. 1.00
CEN 304
16
FRT-101-10
Freshman Tutorial
Lamberton J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
One Helluva Hike: Lessons on How to Live from Dante's Divine Comedy Jill Lamberton who teaches writing and literature courses, is an avid traveler and will return to Wabash in the fall of 2018 after a year in Italy. Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy is one of the great literary achievements of the Western world. Written between about 1308 and 1320 CE, and composed in Italian when great literature was written in Latin, Dante desperately wanted to be ranked among the greatest writers, yet he wasn't necessarily governed by other peoples' rules. The poem-which we will read in English translation-describes a pilgrim named "Dante" who finds himself lost in the middle of his life and begins a journey to get himself unlost. But to find what, exactly? Himself. His first love, "the woman who got away." Revenge. Home. Salvation. God. Each of these answers is correct, yet none is sufficient. The Divine Comedy is a pilgrimage narrative, and, like all pilgrimage narratives, the ultimate goal of spiritual enlightenment is only attainable through travel. You have to leave the comforts of home to find out who you are and how best to live your life. In this freshman tutorial we will travel with Dante through hell, purgatory, and heaven-but also deep into the world of Medieval Italy, learning something about the people, places, beliefs, and questions that moved the spiritual seekers of the middle ages. Assignments in the course will emphasize the speaking, reading, and writing skills necessary for college success, and there will also be one oral presentation. The summer reading for this course is a mystery novel set during the American Civil War-era called The Dante Club, by Matthew Pearl. 1.00
BAX 114
16
FRT-101-11
Freshman Tutorial
McDorman T
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Harry Potter and the Liberal Arts Todd McDorman teaches Rhetoric and enjoys and studies sport, particularly baseball. With 500 million books sold (and translated into 80 different languages), J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter franchise has developed into a global phenomenon. It is probably safe to assume that you've grown up with "The Boy Who Lived," whether that be reading the books, watching the films (which debuted in 2001), or both. With 2018 marking the 20th anniversary of its United States debut, it is a year of celebration for the Potter universe, which also includes a recent play, a new film series, a theme park, and more. Why has Harry Potter developed into a cultural icon? What lessons might we learn from the rich magical world created by J.K. Rowling? What are we to make of the far reaching commercialism existing under the name Harry Potter? The Freshman Tutorial "Harry Potter and the Liberal Arts" investigates such questions by considering the world of Harry Potter from diverse disciplinary perspectives including history, politics, religion, economics, philosophy, and gender. Familiarity with the storylines of the Harry Potter series is encouraged but there is no requirement or expectation that you be an expert to sign up for this class. Fun fact: many Harry Potter books were printed in Crawfordsville, Indiana! 1.00
CEN 305
16
FRT-101-12
Freshman Tutorial
Nelson D, Bowen S
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
God, Human Limits, and the Things That Matter Derek Nelson teaches Religion and makes furniture; he uses scrap wood to smoke meat, which is its own kind of religion for him. Steve Bowen practiced law for forty years and served as chairman of the Wabash board of trustees for ten, before retiring to read even more books than he used to. Diamonds aren't forever, Google doesn't know everything, and -- sorry to say -- not everything is possible. So why do words like "eternal," "omniscient" and "almighty" end up being used in ways that obviously surpass their intended limits? What consequences can we expect when we ignore our own limits? How does the idea of God, or the infinite, or the ultimate, work with and against the limits of our knowledge? Through fiction, film, theological writings and other essays this seminar will explore the ways we appeal to transcendent words and concepts in ordinary life situations. 1.00
CEN 300
16
FRT-101-13
Freshman Tutorial
Novak W
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Race to the Moon Wally Novak is a biochemist who loves astronomy and space exploration. Race to the Moon - October 4, 1957 marks the start of the space race. The Soviet Union's launch of Sputnik sparked fear in the minds of Americans and threatened our national security. Sputnik was followed by a series of space firsts by the Soviet Union and the U.S. struggled to keep up. The U.S. desperately needed a major win, and in 1961 President John F. Kennedy challenged the nation to land a man on the moon and safely return him home. Students taking this course will examine both the technology and the personalities behind the race to the moon (1957 - 1969), and how the recent privatization of space exploration (Space X, Blue Origin, Virgin Galactic, etc.) has affected the space program and the next space race.to Mars. 1.00
DET 212
16
FRT-101-14
Freshman Tutorial
Phillips G
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Eye of the Beholder: Images of Jesus in Gospel and Film Gary Phillips teaches Religion, cycles Indiana back roads, and believes The Matrix explains the meaning of life Have you ever wondered why so many different images of Jesus? A Google search gives us Jesuses who are tall and short, young and old, blue eyed and brown, blond and dark haired, bearded and clean shaven, black and white, brown and yellow, European and Asian, African and American, muscular and emaciated, masculine and feminine, miracle worker and revolutionary. Writers, painters, filmmakers, theologians, and ordinary believers are fascinated by Jesus, and they conjure up images of Jesus that inevitably reflect deeply who they are, where and when they live, and what their concerns and religious beliefs are. Inspired by Jesus' importance, believers fashion a Jesus who speaks to them and their communities' deepest values and most pressing religious questions. This freshman tutorial explores different images of Jesus in ancient Gospel texts and contemporary film. We look at gospel stories that made it into the New Testament (Mark, Matthew, and John) and gospel stories that didn't (Thomas, Philip, and Mary). We will study these different Jesuses in their literary, historical, and theological settings. And we will complement these ancient texts with modern film representations of Jesus (for example, Jesus Christ Superstar, Jesus of Montreal, The Life of Brian, The Last Temptation of Christ, The Passion of the Christ, The Big Lebowski, and The Matrix). We will view these films together over a common meal as we consider why Jesus depends so much on the eye of the beholder. 1.00
MXI 214
16
FRT-101-15
Freshman Tutorial
Poffald E
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Is the Future Here Already? Past and Current Speculations on the World(s) To Come A native of Chile, Esteban Poffald enjoys teaching mathematics, soccer and classical guitar. Gray goo or nanomedicine, malevolent or friendly AI, The Singularity or the Jetsons, Utopia or Dystopia? An exploration of the future through the lenses of fiction writers, scientists, social commentators, and others. In a world with an accelerating rate of scientific and technological progress, the near future is envisioned by many as being full of great promise, but also of grave dangers. In this tutorial we will explore the scientific and technological possibilities for the future, while considering the perilous human, economic, social and political ramifications of "progress". 1.00
HAY 001
16
FRT-101-16
Freshman Tutorial
Rhoades M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
History and Cinema Michelle Rhoades is a long-time skateboarder and traveler to far-flung destinations. In her spare time she makes bread, plays Star Wars Legos with her kid, and goes on 40-mile bicycle rides. Students in this tutorial will explore the relationship between film and history. Naturally, we can view history in motion pictures as a backdrop to the story or actions of the main characters. This is useful for general educational purposes (WWII happened) but what if that history is wrong? When the past is altered and a film becomes very popular, we can still learn a good deal about the society that viewed that film. Choices made by documentary filmmakers can offer interpretations of the past that are incomplete but valuable for understanding viewers' perspectives. Students in this tutorial will read about 20th century European history, view films, and discuss how well the films represent the past. Motion pictures and documentaries screened in the course will address the Holocaust, Weimar Germany, WWI, and WWII. Films screened for class may include "Inglorious Bastards," "The Sorrow and the Pity," "Night and Fog," "Sophie Scholl," "Casablanca," "All Quiet on the Western Front," "Life and Nothing But," "Joyeux Noël," "The Officer's Ward," "Paths of Glory," "Behind the Lines," or "Dawn Patrol." All films will be shown during class time with discussion to follow. 1.00
GOO 305
16
FRT-101-17
Freshman Tutorial
Strader A
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Making Art and Making Trouble Annie Strader teaches performance, video and ceramics, is an artist and mother to two young girls. The Philosopher Theodor Adorno famously wrote, "Every work of art is an uncommitted crime." Throughout the history of social movements and revolutions, artists have responded to violence, injustice and oppression and often have found themselves censored, imprisoned, or facing some other form of persecution. In this tutorial, we will examine artists who address socio-political issues and engage in creative social practice directly with communities creating work that weaves together art and life. We will discuss if Art really can effect social and political change while considering the responsibilities of artists, institutions and curators. We will discuss works by Ai Wei Wei, Banksy, Tania Bruguera, Krzystof Wodiczko, Kara Walker, Mel Chin, Theaster Gates, Rick Lowe, Pussy Riot, Guerilla Girls and many more. 1.00
FIN M140
16
FRT-101-18
Freshman Tutorial
Warner R
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Food in the Liberal Arts Rick Warner worked as a professional chef for over a decade, and now teaches Latin American, African, and World History at Wabash. Can there be anything more central to life than food? Can such a simple subject be made complicated by critical thinking skills in a liberal arts setting? Are there potential connections between EXPERIENCE and REFLECTION that might be gathered by the serious study of food? This freshman seminar will explore the subject of food from numerous disciplinary perspectives; among these are included the disciplines of history, political science, chemistry, economics, and anthropology. We will discover that Food Studies is a new yet fertile academic field. In the end, the course will serve as an introduction to scholarly diversity within the liberal arts, as we hone our skills of critical thinking and expression... and you will learn how to cook! 1.00
MXI 213
16
GEN - GENDER STUDIES
GEN-105-01
Fatherhood
Olofson E
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PSY 105-01 = GEN 105-01 1.00
FIN FA206
40 24 
GEN-200-01
Topics Ethics & Social Phi
Trott A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PHI 109-01/01F = GEN 200-01/01F: Philosophical Perspectives: Nature We refer to nature to make claims about the world, what is and what should be. Nature is used to justify the social order by identifying essences that prescribe roles. It is used to legitimate social hierarchy by dividing the world between what is closer to nature and what overcomes or surpasses nature. Nature is used to distinguish between good and natural actions and bad and unnatural ones. What is more closely associated with nature and material is considered that which culture uses to achieve its ends. This course will examine the philosophical positions behind these claims and critiques of these positions. The course will take up the example of gender at various places across the semester to think about the implications of various conceptions of nature in the history of philosophy. This course is NOT open to Junior and Senior PHI Majors. Prerequisite: None Credit: 1 Instructor: Adriel Trott 1.00
CEN 304
10
GEN-200-01F
Topics Ethics & Social Phi
Trott A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION PHI 109-01/01F = GEN 200-01/01F: Philosophical Perspectives: Nature We refer to nature to make claims about the world, what is and what should be. Nature is used to justify the social order by identifying essences that prescribe roles. It is used to legitimate social hierarchy by dividing the world between what is closer to nature and what overcomes or surpasses nature. Nature is used to distinguish between good and natural actions and bad and unnatural ones. What is more closely associated with nature and material is considered that which culture uses to achieve its ends. This course will examine the philosophical positions behind these claims and critiques of these positions. The course will take up the example of gender at various places across the semester to think about the implications of various conceptions of nature in the history of philosophy. This course is NOT open to Junior and Senior PHI Majors. Prerequisite: None Credit: 1 Instructor: Adriel Trott 1.00
CEN 304
8
GEN-209-01
Special Topics: Behavioral Sci
Olofson E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PSY 210-01 = GEN 209-01: Psychology of Sex and Gender What are the differences between men and women? Why do we tend to emphasize the differences rather than the many similarities? In this course, we will review psychological theory and empirical findings regarding common beliefs about gender, the impact of biological sex on behavior, the role of cultural forces on the construction of gender, the relationship of gender to traditional issues in psychology (e.g., moral development, personality, interpersonal relationships), and special issues pertinent to gender (e.g., gender violence). This course is designed to equip students to critically analyze the evidence for sex differences and similarities, gender roles, and the effect of gender on traditional issues in psychology. Prerequisites PSY 101 or PSY/GEN 105 Credits: 1 Instructor: Eric Olofson 1.00
BAX 212
20 17 
GEN-270-01
Special Topics: Lit/Fine Arts
Benedicks C
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
ENG 180-01 = GEN 270-01: Extraordinary Bodies in Literature and Film We will study literary and filmic representations of bodies that exceed, fall short of, confound, or otherwise problematize "normal" selves. This includes representations of athletes, disabled people, superheroes, pregnant or nursing people, transgender or intersex people, and monsters/mythic creatures of all varieties. All levels of experience welcome. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Crystal Benedicks 1.00
CEN 215
30 25 
GEN-277-01
Special Topics
C. Healey
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ASI 277-01 = GEN 277-01 = SOC 277-01: Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary East Asia This course considers a range of themes related to gender and sexuality in China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. While the course will be interdisciplinary by nature, many of the readings and discussions will be rooted in a sociological approach. Potential topics include: marriage, family, femininity, masculinity, fluid gender identities, queer sexualities, sexual practices, family planning, gendered divisions of labor, gender and the state, women's and LGBTQ+ movements, gendered spaces, the commercialization of sex, and media portrayals of gender and sexuality. Prerequisites: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Cara Healey 1.00
DET 111
20 20 
GEN-490-01
Gender Studies Capstone
Trott A
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
Take GEN-101., Take 2 credits from GEN. 1.00
TBA TBA
10
GER - GERMAN
GER-101-01
Elementary German I
A. Smith
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
CoReq GER-101L 1.00
DET 111
18
GER-101-02
Elementary German I
Redding G
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
CoReq GER-101L 1.00
DET 111
18
GER-101L-01
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
TU
08:25AM - 09:10AM
CoReq GER-101 0.00
DET 212
6
GER-101L-02
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
TU
09:20AM - 10:05AM
CoReq GER-101 0.00
DET 209
6
GER-101L-03
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
W
11:00AM - 11:50AM
CoReq GER-101 0.00
DET 212
6
GER-101L-04
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq GER-101 0.00
DET 112
6
GER-101L-05
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
CoReq GER-101 0.00
DET 109
6
GER-101L-06
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq GER-101 0.00
DET 209
6
GER-101L-07
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
CoReq GER-101 0.00
TBA TBA
6
GER-101L-08
Elementary German I Lab
Staff
W
02:10PM - 03:00PM
CoReq GER-101 0.00
DET 109
6
GER-187-01
Independent Study
Redding G
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
GER-201-01
Intermediate German
Redding G
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PreReq GER-102 or GER-201 placement, CoReq GER-201L 1.00
DET 212
20
GER-201L-01
Intermediate German Lab.
Staff
TU
10:15AM - 11:00AM
CoReq GER-201 0.00
DET 211
6
GER-201L-02
Intermediate German Lab.
Staff
TH
08:45AM - 09:35AM
CoReq GER-201 0.00
DET 209
6
GER-201L-03
Intermediate German Lab.
Staff
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq GER-201 0.00
DET 212
6
GER-201L-04
Intermediate German Lab.
Staff
TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
CoReq GER-201 0.00
DET 209
6
GER-201L-05
Intermediate German Lab.
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
CoReq GER-201 0.00
TBA TBA
 
GER-287-01
Independent Study
Redding G
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
GER-301-01
Conversation & Composition
A. Smith
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PreReq GER-202 or 301 placement 1.00
DET 112
18
GER-312-01
Studies in German Culture
A. Smith
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PreReq GER-301 and 302 1.00
DET 226
12
GER-314-01
Studies in German Literature
Redding G
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PreReq GER-301 and 302 1.00
DET 226
12
GRK - GREEK
GRK-101-01
Beginning Greek I
Wickkiser B
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
CoReq GRK-101L 1.00
DET 111
 
GRK-101L-01
Elementary Greek
Wickkiser B
TBA
TBA - TBA
CoReq GRK-101 0.00
TBA TBA
 
GRK-201-01
Intermediate Greek I
Kubiak D
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq GRK-101 and 102 1.00
TBA TBA
 
GRK-301-01
Advanced Greek Reading: Poetry
Kubiak D
TBA
TBA - TBA
GRK-201 1.00
TBA TBA
 
HIS - HISTORY
HIS-101-01F
World History to 1500
Warner R
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
BAX 202
35
HIS-101-02
World History to 1500
Morillo S, Royalty B
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
BAX 202
35 -1 
HIS-200-01
Topics World Comp History
Royalty B
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
HIS 200-01/01F: A History of the End of the World How will the world end? When will the world end? Will the world end at all? While many recall the May 21, 2011 "deadline" of Harold Camping's Family Radio caravans and the "ending" of the Mayan calendar in December 2012, these questions have provoked the human imagination for millennia. This course will study the history of how these questions have been posed and answered from Jewish and Christian communities in the ancient Mediterranean world to Christians in medieval Europe to contemporary America. Using the lenses of social and cultural history, we will examine how these apocalyptic ideologies have been shaped by historical events and how subgroups have interacted with, and often changed, society. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Robert Royalty 1.00
BAX 202
20
HIS-200-01F
Topics World Comp History
Royalty B
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION HIS 200-01/01F: A History of the End of the World How will the world end? When will the world end? Will the world end at all? While many recall the May 21, 2011 "deadline" of Harold Camping's Family Radio caravans and the "ending" of the Mayan calendar in December 2012, these questions have provoked the human imagination for millennia. This course will study the history of how these questions have been posed and answered from Jewish and Christian communities in the ancient Mediterranean world to Christians in medieval Europe to contemporary America. Using the lenses of social and cultural history, we will examine how these apocalyptic ideologies have been shaped by historical events and how subgroups have interacted with, and often changed, society. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Robert Royalty 1.00
BAX 202
5
HIS-211-01
Ancient Hist:Greece
Wickkiser B
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CLA 105-01 = HIS 211-01 1.00
HAY 319
50 35 
HIS-220-01
Topics Med & Early Mod Europe
M. Ables
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MUS 205-01 = HIS 220-01 1.00
FIN FA206
 
HIS-240-01
Topics in American History
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
EDU 370-01 = HIS 240-01: Social Studies Education for Democratic Citizenship This course takes a "difficult questions" approach to explore the ways in which social studies education in the U.S. must grapple with complex historic content--and sometimes fails to do so adequately. Topics explored include: history curriculum related to immigrant history, slavery, and indigenous peoples; geography approaches such as critical geography to focus upon power relationships; and instruction in U.S. government and economy including the history and nature of social contract, separation of powers, and individual rights and freedoms. Prerequisite: None Credits: 0.5 (First Half-Semester Course) Instructor: Deborah Seltzer-Kelly 0.50
DET 220
10
HIS-240-02
Topics in American History
Seltzer-Kelly D
M W
02:10PM - 03:25PM
EDU 370-02 = HIS 240-02: Science Education for Democratic Citizenship This course explores the history and dilemmas of U.S. educational approaches to science literacy during the 20th and early 21st centuries. Topics include: constructions of the nature of scientific method; recurring dilemmas such as evolution and global warming; and ways in which notions of science literacy itself are understood and discussed in governmental and educational policy and institutions. Prerequisite: None Credits: 0.5 (Second Half-Semester Course) Instructor: Deborah Seltzer-Kelly 0.50
DET 220
10
HIS-241-01
United States to 1865
Thomas S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
MXI 109
20
HIS-241-01F
United States to 1865
Thomas S
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
MXI 109
5
HIS-260-01
Topics Asian History
C. Healey
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
ASI 260-01/01F = HIS 260-01/01F: China's Cultural Revolution In 1966, Mao Zedong declared the start of China's Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, a political and ideological campaign to mobilize China's youth against traditional institutions of all kinds. What followed were ten years of violence and chaos that left an irrevocable mark on Chinese history. This course will consider the causes and legacies of the Cultural Revolution from multiple perspectives. We will study the experiences of individuals from all walks of society as well as how the event has been remembered in a variety of media. Prerequisites: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Cara Healey 1.00
DET 112
15 13 
HIS-260-01F
Topics Asian History
C. Healey
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION ASI 260-01/01F = HIS 260-01/01F: China's Cultural Revolution In 1966, Mao Zedong declared the start of China's Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, a political and ideological campaign to mobilize China's youth against traditional institutions of all kinds. What followed were ten years of violence and chaos that left an irrevocable mark on Chinese history. This course will consider the causes and legacies of the Cultural Revolution from multiple perspectives. We will study the experiences of individuals from all walks of society as well as how the event has been remembered in a variety of media. Prerequisites: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Cara Healey 1.00
DET 112
5
HIS-260-02
Topics Asian History
Morillo S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
HIS 260-02/02F: China, 400 BCE-400 CE This course surveys the Warring States Era and the early Chinese Dynasties - Qin, Han, and the Han's immediate successors, constituting the "classical" period of Chinese history. While encompassing a broad range of topics including economic, social and cultural aspects of Chinese life in this era, the focus will be on the political development of the Chinese state, including its philosophical foundations and the evolution of its administrative and military mechanisms. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Stephen Morillo 1.00
BAX 114
20 15 
HIS-260-02F
Topics Asian History
Morillo S
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION HIS 260-02/02F: China, 400 BCE-400 CE This course surveys the Warring States Era and the early Chinese Dynasties - Qin, Han, and the Han's immediate successors, constituting the "classical" period of Chinese history. While encompassing a broad range of topics including economic, social and cultural aspects of Chinese life in this era, the focus will be on the political development of the Chinese state, including its philosophical foundations and the evolution of its administrative and military mechanisms. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Stephen Morillo 1.00
BAX 114
5
HIS-300-01
Adv Topics:World&Comp History
Morillo S
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HIS 300-01: World Naval and Maritime History, 1500-1800 This seminar will examine in detail key aspects and episodes of sea-borne activity around the world in the Late Agrarian era. Mechanisms of trade in the Indian Ocean, the operations of the Spanish treasure fleets, piracy, and the classic age of sail and cannon naval warfare - which we will explore in part through a table-top simulation game of the professor's invention - are among the topics we will focus on. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Stephen Morillo 0.5 credit from HIS 1.00
BAX 114
15
HIS-310-01
Adv Topics:Anc History
Wickkiser B
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
HIS-310-01 = CLA-105-01 HIS-310-01 = HIS-211-01 .5 credits HIS HIST CLA 0.50-1.00
HAY 319
1
HIS-330-01
Adv Topics: Modern Europe
Rhoades M
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
IMMERSION COURSE - PARIS HIS 330-01: French History and Historical Memory How the history is created in France and how historical memory functions in present-day Paris is the theoretical focus of this course. It's clear that individuals chose to write about some things rather than others and governments keep only a portion of the documents produced. But when individuals select or conserve particular documents, they make a statement about how they see themselves, their country, and their present. In this course on French history, students will explore issues relevant to the field of historical memory. Course reading topics will include the creation of the city of Paris, the Louvre, café culture, and France's military history. To augment course readings, students will travel to Paris to examine historical "sites" of memory. These include: WW II and Holocaust memorials in Paris; the Château of Versailles; the Louvre museum; the Musée D'Orsay, Napoleon's Tomb; Notre Dame de Paris, and still others. Paris remains the #1 tourist destination in the world. However, this is not a tourist excursion. The workload requires extensive reading and classroom participation, several short papers, and a brief research paper. On site, students will participate in daily class meetings and events. Participants may be asked to blog about their experiences while abroad. Upon their return to the United States, students will present final observations during a poster session open to the public. Some history background is preferred but not required. Pre-approval to register for the course is required. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Michele Rhoades PreReq HIS-230, 231, or 232 1.00
GOO 310
12
HIS-350-01
Advanced Topics Latin America
Warner R
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
FULFILLS HSP REQUIREMENT HIS 350-01: Religion in Latin America This course concerns the history of religious belief and practice in Latin America and the Caribbean from pre-Columbian times until the present. Native traditions, the introduction and reception of Catholicism, Liberation Theology, and the Rise of Protestantism will be the major themes of the course. Students will produce a 15-20 page term paper on an appropriate topic of their choice as the culminating project for the class Prerequisite: One HIS Credit Credits: 1 Instructor: Richard Warner .5 credit from HIS 1.00
BAX 201
15
HIS-487-01
Independent Study
Warner R
M
01:00PM - 02:00PM
0.50-1.00
BAX OFF
1
HIS-497-01
Phil & Craft of Hist
Royalty B
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
BAX 201
15
HIS-498-01
Research Seminar
Thomas S
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
BAX 201
9 -1 
HIS-498-02
Research Seminar
Rhoades M
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
BAX 212
9
HSP - HISPANIC STUDIES
HSP-400-01
Senior Capstone
Warner R
W
10:00AM - 11:00AM
1.00
BAX OFF
1
HUM - HUMANITIES
HUM-196-01
Religion & Lit
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
REL 196-01 = ASI 196-01 = HUM 196-01: Religion and Literature: "Old Pond-Frog Jumps In": Religion in Japanese Literature "Old pond-frog jumps in-sound of water." So runs the famous haiku by Basho. Is it religious? For the Japanese, yes. In Japan religion and art are arguably the same thing. In this course we'll ask how and why. We'll study Japanese ideas about art and religion (e.g. emptiness, solitude, "sublime beauty"), and how they appear in Japanese literature. We'll read selections from Japanese poetry (including haiku), No drama, novels both classic and modern (e.g. The Tale of Genji, Kawabata), and some short stories. For first half-semester at 9:45 TTh, see REL 275-01. Prerequisite: None Credits: 0.5 (Second Half-Semester Course) Instructor: David Blix 0.50
MXI 109
20 16 
HUM-295-01
Religion and the Arts
Phillips G
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
REL 295-01 = ART 210-02 = HUM 295-01: Religion and Representations of the Holocaust This course explores a variety of representations of the Holocaust in theology, literature, film, and art. This interdisciplinary course examines the creative and material work of historians, theologians, novelists, poets, graphic novelists, painters, film makers, composers, photographers, and museum architects. The course explores the limits and possibilities of representing atrocity by raising such questions as: Can suffering be represented? What do representations of the Jewish genocide convey to 21st century citizens and subsequent generations of Jews and Christians? Is it barbaric to write poetry and fiction, paint or compose music, film documentaries and TV comedies, draw cartoons and graphic novels, publish photographs or erect monuments about such horrific events? How does visual media facilitate the raising of profound moral and religious questions about the Holocaust and our responses to it? Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Gary Phillips 1.00
CEN 305
20 18 
HUM-400-01
Senior Project
Hardy J
TBA
TBA - TBA
2.00
TBA TBA
 
INT - INTERNSHIP
INT-398-01
Internship
Olofson E
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
1
INT-498-01
Internship
Mikek P
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
2
INT-498-02
Internship
Thompson P
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
2
LAT - LATIN
LAT-101-01
Beginning Latin I
Hartnett J
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq LAT-101L 1.00
DET 111
 
LAT-101L-01
Beginning Latin
Hartnett J
TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CoReq LAT-101 0.00
DET 212
 
LAT-101L-02
Beginning Latin
Hartnett J
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq LAT-101 0.00
DET 212
 
LAT-201-01
Intermediate Latin I
Hartnett J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
LAT-102 or placement in LAT-201 1.00
DET 111
 
LAT-301-01
Advanced Latin Reading: Poetry
Wickkiser B
M W
02:30PM - 04:00PM
Immersion trip; Registration through instructor only. LAT-201 or 301 placement 1.00
HAY 321
 
MAS - MULTICULTURAL AMERICAN STUDIES
MAS-102-01
World Music
Makubuya J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
MUS 102-01 = MAS 102-01 1.00
FIN M120
20 18 
MAS-201-01
Philosophy of Education
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
EDU 201-01 = MAS 201-01 = PHI 299-01 Take FRT-101; Minimum Grade D; 1.00
DET 111
18 17 
MAT - MATHEMATICS
MAT-010-01
Pre-Calc. With Intro to Calc.
J. Cole
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
MAT-010 placement 1.00
HAY 003
30
MAT-108-01
Intro to Discrete Structures
McKinney C
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
GOO 104
24 -2 
MAT-111-01
Calculus I
Z. Gates
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00
HAY 003
35
MAT-111-02
Calculus I
Ansaldi K
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
1.00
HAY 003
35
MAT-111-03
Calculus I
J. Cole
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
GOO 101
24
MAT-111-04
Calculus I
Z. Gates
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
HAY 003
35
MAT-112-01
Calculus II
McKinney C
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq MAT-110, 111 with a grade of C- or better or 112 placement 1.00
GOO 101
24 11 
MAT-112-02
Calculus II
J. Cole
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
PreReq MAT-110, 111 with a grade of C- or better or 112 placement 1.00
HAY 003
24 21 
MAT-223-01
Elementary Linear Algebra
Z. Gates
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PreReq MAT-112 with a minimum grade of C- or 223 placement. 1.00
HAY 001
24 11 
MAT-223-02
Elementary Linear Algebra
McKinney C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PreReq MAT-112 with a minimum grade of C- or 223 placement. 1.00
GOO 101
24 13 
MAT-225-01
Multivariable Calculus
Ansaldi K
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
PreReq MAT-112 with a minimum grade of C- and 223. 1.00
GOO 101
24 11 
MAT-251-01
Mathematical Finance
Thompson P
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PreReq MAT-112 0.50
GOO 104
35 27 
MAT-252-01
Math. Interest Theory
Thompson P
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PreReq MAT-112 0.50
GOO 104
35 29 
MAT-253-01
Probability Models
Thompson P
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq MAT-112 0.50
GOO 104
35 20 
MAT-254-01
Statistical Models
Thompson P
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
MAT-112 0.50
GOO 305
24 19 
MAT-332-01
Abstract Algebra II
Ansaldi K
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
MAT-331 1.00
GOO 006
20 15 
MAT-333-01
Funct Real Variable I
Poffald E
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PreReq MAT-223 1.00
HAY 002
18 15 
MAT-337-01
Numerical Analysis
Poffald E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
MAT 337-01 = CSC 337-01 CSC-111 and MAT-223 1.00
GOO 101
24 18 
MAT-337-02
Numerical Analysis
Poffald E
TBA
TBA - TBA
CSC-111 and MAT-223 1.00
TBA TBA
1
MAT-353-01
Probability Models II
Thompson P
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq MAT-253 0.50
GOO 104
35 25 
MAT-355-01
Regression Models
Thompson P
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
MAT-223, 253, 254 0.50
GOO 305
24 22 
MLL - MODERN LANGUAGES
MLL-101-01
Elementary Modern Language I
Li Y
TBA
TBA - TBA
CoReq MLL-101L 1.00
TBA TBA
2
MLL-101L-01
Elementary MLL Lab
Li Y
TBA
TBA - TBA
CoReq MLL-101 0.00
TBA TBA
2
MLL-187-01
Independent Study
Li Y
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1
MUS - MUSIC
MUS-101-01
Music in Society: A History
M. Ables
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
FIN FA206
25 16 
MUS-101-02
Music in Society: A History
Spencer R
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
BAX 212
25 10 
MUS-102-01
World Music
Makubuya J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
MUS 102-01 = MAS 102-01 1.00
FIN M120
20 12 
MUS-107-01
Basic Theory and Notation
C. Renk
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
FIN M140
20 11 
MUS-151-01
Brass Ensemble
C. Downey
W
07:00PM - 08:30PM
0.50
FIN CONC
 
MUS-152-01
Chamber Orchestra
Abel A
M
04:15PM - 05:30PM
0.50
FIN CONC
 
MUS-153-01
Glee Club
Spencer R
M TH
07:00PM - 09:00PM
0.50
FIN CONC
 
MUS-155-01
Jazz Ensemble
Pazera C
TU
07:00PM - 09:00PM
0.50
FIN CONC
 
MUS-156-01
Wamidan World Music Ensemble
Makubuya J
W F
05:00PM - 06:30PM
0.50
FIN CONC
 
MUS-161-01
Beginning Applied Music
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-160 and Complete Department Placement Exam or MUS-107. 0.50
TBA TBA
 
MUS-201-01
Music Theory I
C. Renk
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PreReq MUS-107 or Permission of Instructor, CoReq MUS-201L 1.00
FIN M140
 
MUS-201L-01
Music Theory I Lab
Spencer R
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq MUS-201, MUS-106 or 107 0.00
FIN M140
 
MUS-201L-02
Music Theory I Lab
Spencer R
F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq MUS-201, MUS-106 or 107 0.00
FIN M140
 
MUS-204-01
Special Topics in Music
Makubuya J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
MUS 204-01 = ASI 204-01: Music in East Asian Cultures This is an introductory survey of the music, musical instruments, and their contextual significance in the societies of China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Pakistan. Beyond the instruments and their roles in producing musical sound, this course will examine the significant ceremonies, rites, and rituals enhanced by the music, as a forum for learning about the cultures of these countries. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: James Makubuya 1.00
FIN TGRR
 
MUS-205-01
European Music Before 1750
M. Ables
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
MUS 205-01 = HIS 220-01 1.00
FIN FA206
 
MUS-221-01
Intro to Electronic Music
C. Renk
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
FIN M140
20 16 
MUS-261-01
Intermediate Applied Music I
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-260. 0.50
TBA TBA
 
MUS-287-01
Independent Study
Makubuya J
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50-1.00
TBA TBA
 
MUS-287-02
Independent Study
Makubuya J
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
MUS-297-01
Electronic Music Projects
Renk C
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prereq: MUS-221. 0.50
TBA TBA
1
MUS-361-01
Intermediate Applied Music II
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: take MUS-360. 0.50
TBA TBA
 
MUS-461-01
Advanced Applied Music
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
Prerequisite: Take MUS-460. 0.50
TBA TBA
 
NSC - NEUROSCIENCE
NSC-333-01
Research Behav. Neuroscience
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
NSC 333-01 = PSY 333-01 PreReq PSY-233 or BIO-112 0.50
BAX 312
12 12 
NSC-400-01
Senior Capstone
Gunther K, Schmitzer-Torbert N, Walsh H
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
 
OCS - OFF CAMPUS STUDY
OCS-01-01
Off Campus Study
Staff
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PE - PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE-011-01
Advanced Fitness
Brumett K
M W F
06:00AM - 07:15AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PE-011-02
Advanced Fitness
Martin J
M W F
06:30AM - 07:30AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PE-011-03
Advanced Fitness
Martin J
M W F
07:30AM - 08:30AM
0.00
TBA TBA
 
PHI - PHILOSOPHY
PHI-109-01
Perspectives on Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PHI 109-01/01F = GEN 200-01/01F: Philosophical Perspectives: Nature We refer to nature to make claims about the world, what is and what should be. Nature is used to justify the social order by identifying essences that prescribe roles. It is used to legitimate social hierarchy by dividing the world between what is closer to nature and what overcomes or surpasses nature. Nature is used to distinguish between good and natural actions and bad and unnatural ones. What is more closely associated with nature and material is considered that which culture uses to achieve its ends. This course will examine the philosophical positions behind these claims and critiques of these positions. The course will take up the example of gender at various places across the semester to think about the implications of various conceptions of nature in the history of philosophy. This course is NOT open to Junior and Senior PHI Majors. Prerequisite: None Credit: 1 Instructor: Adriel Trott 1.00
CEN 304
10
PHI-109-01F
Perspectives on Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION PHI 109-01/01F = GEN 200-01/01F: Philosophical Perspectives: Nature We refer to nature to make claims about the world, what is and what should be. Nature is used to justify the social order by identifying essences that prescribe roles. It is used to legitimate social hierarchy by dividing the world between what is closer to nature and what overcomes or surpasses nature. Nature is used to distinguish between good and natural actions and bad and unnatural ones. What is more closely associated with nature and material is considered that which culture uses to achieve its ends. This course will examine the philosophical positions behind these claims and critiques of these positions. The course will take up the example of gender at various places across the semester to think about the implications of various conceptions of nature in the history of philosophy. This course is NOT open to Junior and Senior PHI Majors. Prerequisite: None Credit: 1 Instructor: Adriel Trott 1.00
CEN 304
8
PHI-110-01
Philosophical Ethics
Hughes C
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PHI 110-01 = PHI 110-01F 1.00
CEN 215
15 -1 
PHI-110-01F
Philosophical Ethics
Hughes C
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PHI 110-01 = PHI 110-01F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
CEN 215
15
PHI-124-01
Philosophy and Film
Gower J
TU
01:10PM - 03:55PM
TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PHI 124-01 = PHI 124-01F 1.00
CEN 216
CEN 216
17
PHI-124-01F
Philosophy and Film
Gower J
TU
01:10PM - 03:55PM
TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PHI 124-01 = PHI 124-01F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
CEN 216
CEN 216
8
PHI-213-01
Philosophy of Law
Hughes C
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
1.00
CEN 300
18
PHI-240-01
Ancient Philosophy
Trott A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PHI 240-01 = CLA 240-01 1.00
DET 209
30
PHI-269-01
Topics Metaphys Epistemology
Carlson M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PHI 269-01: Topics in Metaphysics and Epistemology: Knowledge and Skepticism Here are some things that I take myself to know. I am currently awake, and not merely dreaming. The universe is billions of years old, and did not come into existence five minutes ago. I have hands. Antarctica is a continent, but the Arctic is not. There are 238 Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives. The sun will rise tomorrow. But how do I know those things? This question is made particularly pressing by the existence of philosophical skepticism, according to which it is impossible for us to know what the world around us is actually like. Despite skepticism's absurd appearance, in this course we will study how it arises directly out of our ordinary practices of ascribing knowledge to others and pursuing it ourselves. In light of this, we will study classic and contemporary works in epistemology to help us to explore how philosophical skepticism forces us to reconsider what our knowledge is, and how it is possible for us to have it. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Matthew Carlson 1.00
GOO 310
18 11 
PHI-270-01
Elem Symbolic Logic
Carlson M
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
CEN 216
35 10 
PHI-299-01
Special Topics in Philosophy
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PHI 299-01 = EDU 201-01 = MAS 201-01 Take FRT-101. 1.00
DET 111
18 17 
PHI-345-01
Continental Philosophy
Hughes C
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
Prereq: PHI-240 (or taken concurrently)., PreReq PHI-242 1.00
CEN 300
 
PHI-449-01
Senior Seminar
Carlson M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PHI-449 Senior Seminar: The Philosophy of David Hume David Hume (1711-1776) was a central figure in the "Scottish Enlightenment" of the 18th century, and stands today as one of the most important and influential philosophers in the Western philosophical tradition. Hume produced groundbreaking new approaches in many areas of philosophical inquiry, including knowledge, morality, and the relationship between philosophy and science. While many of his arguments were, and are, disturbing to established systems of thought, the eloquence and intellectual integrity with which he made those arguments is beyond reproach. In this course, we will study some of Hume's central contributions to epistemology, ethics, and the study of human behavior by close and careful examination of his most important philosophical works, A Treatise of Human Nature and his Enquiries Concerning Human Understanding and Concerning the Principles of Morals. This course is required for senior philosophy majors, but is open to other students. Prerequisite: PHI-242 Credits: 1 Instructor: Matthew Carlson 1.00
GOO 310
12
PHY - PHYSICS
PHY-109-01
Motion and Waves
J. Ross
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PHY 109-01 = PHY 109-01F CoReq PHY-109L. 1.00
GOO 104
20
PHY-109-01F
Motion and Waves
J. Ross
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PHY 109-01 = PHY 109-01F CoReq PHY-109L. 1.00
GOO 104
2
PHY-109L-01
Motion and Waves Lab
J. Ross
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
PHY 109L-01 = PHY 109L-01F CoReq PHY-109. 0.00
TBA TBA
20
PHY-109L-01F
Motion and Waves Lab
J. Ross
W
01:10PM - 04:00PM
PHY 109L-01 = PHY 109L-01F CoReq PHY-109. 0.00
TBA TBA
2
PHY-111-01
General Physics I
Brown J
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
PHY 111-01 = PHY 111-01F PreReq MAT-110 or 111 or placement into MAT-111 with concurrent registration, or placement into 112, or 223, CoReq PHY-111L 1.00
GOO 104
45 35 
PHY-111-01F
General Physics I
Brown J
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
PHY 111-01 = PHY 111-01F PreReq MAT-110 or 111 or placement into MAT-111 with concurrent registration, or placement into 112, or 223, CoReq PHY-111L 1.00
GOO 104
18
PHY-111L-01
General Physics Lab
Brown J
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
PHY 111L-01 = PHY 111L-01F CoReq PHY-111 0.00
TBA TBA
15
PHY-111L-01F
General Physics Lab
Brown J
M
01:10PM - 04:00PM
PHY 111L-01 = PHY 111L-01F CoReq PHY-111 0.00
TBA TBA
6
PHY-111L-02
General Physics Lab
J. Ross
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
PHY 111L-02 = PHY 111L-02F CoReq PHY-111 0.00
TBA TBA
15
PHY-111L-02F
General Physics Lab
J. Ross
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
PHY 111L-02 = PHY 111L-02F CoReq PHY-111 0.00
TBA TBA
6
PHY-209-01
General Physics III
N. Tompkins
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq PHY-112 with grade of C- or better and MAT-112, CoReq PHY-209L 1.00
GOO 305
20 15 
PHY-209L-01
Thermal Physics Lab
N. Tompkins
TU
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq PHY-209, PHY-112 and MAT-112 0.00
TBA TBA
20 15 
PHY-287-01
Independent Study
N. Tompkins
TBA
TBA - TBA
0.50
TBA TBA
1
PHY-310-01
Classical Mechanics
N. Tompkins
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PreReq PHY-210 with a C- or better and and MAT-224 or permission of instructor. 1.00
GOO 305
20 15 
PHY-315-01
Quantum Mechanics
J. Ross
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq PHY-210 with grade of C- or better and MAT-223, 224 1.00
GOO 307
20 13 
PHY-381-01
Advanced Laboratory I
Brown J
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
PreReq PHY-210, CoReq PHY-381L 0.50
GOO 305
20 15 
PHY-381L-01
Advanced Lab
Brown J
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq PHY-381, PHY-210 0.00
TBA TBA
20 20 
PHY-382-01
Advanced Laboratory II
Brown J
TH
01:10PM - 04:00PM
PreReq PHY-381 0.50
GOO 305
20 18 
PSC - POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSC-111-01
Intro to Amer Govt & Politics
T. Masthay
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PSC 111-01 = PSC 111-01F 1.00
BAX 114
25 -1 
PSC-111-01F
Intro to Amer Govt & Politics
T. Masthay
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PSC 111-01 = PSC 111-01F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
BAX 114
10
PSC-121-01
Intro to Comparative Politics
Hollander E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PSC 121-01 = PSC 121-01F 1.00
DET 109
22
PSC-121-01F
Intro to Comparative Politics
Hollander E
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
PSC 121-01 = PSC 121-01F FRESHMEN SECTION ONLY 1.00
DET 109
14
PSC-141-01
Intro to Intn'l Relations
Wells M
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PSC 141-01 = PSC 141-01F 1.00
BAX 202
25
PSC-141-01F
Intro to Intn'l Relations
Wells M
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PSC 141-01 = PSC 141-01F 1.00
BAX 202
10
PSC-210-01
Int Topics American Politics
Seltzer-Kelly D
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
EDU 240-01 = PSC 210-01 1.00
DET 112
18 15 
PSC-210-02
Int Topics American Politics
T. Masthay
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
This course will examine the fundamental features of congressional elections and use them to analyze the 2018 midterms in real time. How does incumbency help members of Congress win re-election? Does spending more money really give candidates a better chance of winning? What is the profile of a person who decides to run for Congress in the first place? These are the types of questions you will be able to answer at the end of the semester. The 'permanent campaign' that emanates from Capitol Hill is of intrigue as the midterm elections are rapidly approaching. Students will be able to apply what we have learned to what they see in the news during the run up to Election Day in November. 1.00
BAX 201
15
PSC-297-01
Research/Stats-Political Sci
Hollander E
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
1.00
GOO 101
15
PSC-313-01
Constitutional Law
Himsel S
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
1.00
BAX 212
20
PSC-327-01
Nationalism and Ethnic Conflic
Hollander E
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PSC-121 with C- or better. 1.00
BAX 212
10
PSC-344-01
Insurgency/Revolution/Terror
Wells M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PSC-141 1.00
LIB LGL
17
PSC-497-01
Senior Seminar
Wells M, Staff
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
BAX 114
25
PSY - PSYCHOLOGY
PSY-101-01F
Introduction to Psychology
Horton R
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
BAX 101
40 13 
PSY-101-02
Introduction to Psychology
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
BAX 101
40 11 
PSY-105-01
Fatherhood
Olofson E
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PSY 105-01 = GEN 105-01 1.00
FIN FA206
40 16 
PSY-201-01
Research Methods & Stats I
Bost P
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
PreReq PSY-101 1.00
BAX 214
30 13 
PSY-202-01
Research Methods & Stats II
Gunther K
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PreReq PSY-201 1.00
BAX 214
30 21 
PSY-210-01
Intermediate Special Topics
Olofson E
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PSY 210-01 = GEN 209-01: Psychology of Sex and Gender What are the differences between men and women? Why do we tend to emphasize the differences rather than the many similarities? In this course, we will review psychological theory and empirical findings regarding common beliefs about gender, the impact of biological sex on behavior, the role of cultural forces on the construction of gender, the relationship of gender to traditional issues in psychology (e.g., moral development, personality, interpersonal relationships), and special issues pertinent to gender (e.g., gender violence). This course is designed to equip students to critically analyze the evidence for sex differences and similarities, gender roles, and the effect of gender on traditional issues in psychology. Prerequisites PSY 101 or PSY/GEN 105 Credits: 1 Instructor: Eric Olofson 1.00
BAX 212
20 19 
PSY-220-01
Child Development
Olofson E
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PreReq PSY-101 or 105 1.00
TBA TBA
25 18 
PSY-231-01
Cognition
Bost P
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PreReq PSY-201 1.00
BAX 301
25 14 
PSY-232-01
Sensation and Perception
Gunther K
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
Prereq: NSC-204, PSY-204, BIO-101 or BIO-111 1.00
BAX 311
25 18 
PSY-235-01
Cognitive Neuropsychology
Gunther K
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
PreReq PSY-101 1.00
BAX 311
25 20 
PSY-287-01
Intermediate Research
Schmitzer-Torbert N
TBA
TBA - TBA
PSY-201 0.50
TBA TBA
1
PSY-301-01
Literature Review
Schmitzer-Torbert N
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
PreReq PSY-201 1.00
BAX 312
10
PSY-322-01
Research in Social Psychology
Horton R
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PreReq PSY-202 and 222 0.50
BAX 301
12
PSY-333-01
Research Behav. Neuroscience
Schmitzer-Torbert N
M W F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
PSY 333-01 = NSC 333-01 PreReq PSY-233. 0.50
BAX 312
12 10 
PSY-495-01
Senior Project
Gunther K
M
03:00PM - 04:50PM
PreReq: PSY-202, PSY-301 (may be taken concurrently) 0.50
BAX OFF
 
PSY-495-02
Senior Project
Bost P
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq: PSY-202, PSY-301 (may be taken concurrently) 0.50
TBA TBA
 
PSY-495-03
Senior Project
Horton R
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq: PSY-202, PSY-301 (may be taken concurrently) 0.50
TBA TBA
 
PSY-495-04
Senior Project
Olofson E
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq: PSY-202, PSY-301 (may be taken concurrently) 0.50
TBA TBA
 
PSY-495-05
Senior Project
Schmitzer-Torbert N
TBA
TBA - TBA
PreReq: PSY-202, PSY-301 (may be taken concurrently) 0.50
TBA TBA
 
REL - RELIGION
REL-103-01
Islam & the Religions of India
Blix D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
REL 103-01 = REL 103-01F 1.00
CEN 216
45
REL-103-01F
Islam & the Religions of India
Blix D
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
REL 103-01 = REL 103-01F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
CEN 216
5
REL-141-01
Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Phillips G
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
REL 141-01 = REL 141-01F 1.00
CEN 215
20
REL-141-01F
Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Phillips G
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
REL 141-01 = REL 141-01F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
CEN 215
5
REL-171-01
History Christianity to Reform
Nelson D
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
REL 171-01 = REL 171-01F 1.00
CEN 216
40
REL-171-01F
History Christianity to Reform
Nelson D
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
REL 171-01 = REL 171-01F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
CEN 216
10
REL-181-01
Religion in America
Baer J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
REL 181-01 = REL 181-01F 1.00
CEN 216
35 21 
REL-181-01F
Religion in America
Baer J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
REL 181-01 = REL 181-01F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
CEN 216
15
REL-196-01
Religion & Literature
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
REL 196-01 = ASI 196-01 = HUM 196-01: Religion and Literature: "Old Pond--Frog Jumps In": Religion in Japanese Literature. "Old pond--frog jumps in--sound of water." So runs the famous haiku by Basho. Is it religious? For the Japanese, yes. In Japan religion and art are arguably the same thing. In this course we'll ask how and why. We'll study Japanese ideas about art and religion (e.g. emptiness, solitude, "sublime beauty"), and how they appear in Japanese literature. We'll read selections from Japanese poetry (including haiku), No drama, novels both classic and modern (e.g. The Tale of Genji, Kawabata), and some short stories. For first half-semester at 9:45 TTh, see REL 275-01. Prerequisite: None. Credits: 0.5 (Second Half-Semester Course) Instructor: David Blix 0.50
MXI 109
20
REL-270-01
Theological Ethics
S. Bowen
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
1.00
CEN 305
20 11 
REL-275-01
Topics in Religion & Phil
Blix D
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
REL 275-01: Topics in Religion and Philosophy: Religion and Science. Are religion and science in conflict with each other? In agreement? How or why, one way or the other? These are our questions. We'll do two main things in this course. First, we'll take a careful look at the different "ways of knowing" that are characteristic of science and religion, respectively. Second, we'll look at several models for thinking critically and responsibly about how they are related. Readings will include selections from Bertolt Brecht, Alan Lightman, Jacob Bronowski, John Polkinghorne, and others, as well as some classic texts in the history of science. For second half-semester at 9:45 TTh, see REL 196-01. Prerequisite: None. Credits: 0.5 (First Half-Semester Course) Instructor: David Blix 0.50
MXI 109
20 -1 
REL-280-01
Topics in American Religion
Baer J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
REL 280-01: Religion and Sports in America This seminar examines the relationship between religion and sports in American history and the contemporary United States. The world of American sports overflows with religious elements: players praying after games and speaking openly about their faith; the elevation of superstar athletes to modern gods; sports as a means of acculturation and character formation; the creation of sacred space, time, and rituals; the devotion which some fans give to their teams; the cultural worship of youth, health, and fitness; the historic connections between religious ceremonies and athletics; and much more. Drawing upon a range of disciplinary methods, we will investigate the ways religion and sports uphold similar ideals as well as the ways they are in competition with one another for the hearts, minds, bodies, and resources of their devotees. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Jonathan Baer 1.00
CEN 304
20
REL-295-01
Religion and the Arts
Phillips G
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
REL 295-01 = ART 210-02 = HUM 295-01: Religion and Representations of the Holocaust This course explores a variety of representations of the Holocaust in theology, literature, film, and art. This interdisciplinary course examines the creative and material work of historians, theologians, novelists, poets, graphic novelists, painters, film makers, composers, photographers, and museum architects. The course explores the limits and possibilities of representing atrocity by raising such questions as: Can suffering be represented? What do representations of the Jewish genocide convey to 21st century citizens and subsequent generations of Jews and Christians? Is it barbaric to write poetry and fiction, paint or compose music, film documentaries and TV comedies, draw cartoons and graphic novels, publish photographs or erect monuments about such horrific events? How does visual media facilitate the raising of profound moral and religious questions about the Holocaust and our responses to it? Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Gary Phillips 1.00
CEN 305
20
REL-297-01
Anthropology of Religion
Baer J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
REL 297-01: Anthropology of Religion A seminar examining the various ways anthropology describes and interprets religious phenomena. We will study anthropological theories of religion, and focus on how these theories apply to specific religions in diverse contexts. We will pay particular attention to the social and symbolic functions of beliefs and rituals and to the religious importance of myths, symbols, and cosmology. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Jonathan Baer 1.00
LIB LSEM
15
REL-373-01
Seminar in Theology
Nelson D
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
REL 373-01: God, Guns and Jail: Theology and Criminal Justice This course examines the present state of the American criminal justice system and interprets it from the point of view of Christian theological commitments. The history of the prison, or as it sometimes called, a "penitentiary," relies on theological notions of penance and penitence. Our understanding of what "justice" means draws heavily on theological understandings of punishment, right and wrong, and atonement. Topics to be considered include violent crime and gun culture, for-profit and faith-based prisons, institutional racism, the purpose and rationale for punishment, the meaning of "redemption," and whether "sin" and "evil" are individual, structural, or both. Prerequisite: One REL Credit Credits: 1 Instructor: Derek Nelson 1.00
CEN 304
20
REL-490-01
Sr. Sem: Nature & Study of Rel
Blix D
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
1.00
CEN 304
 
RHE - RHETORIC
RHE-101-01
Public Speaking
Drury S
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
1.00
FIN FA206
20
RHE-101-02
Public Speaking
Drury J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
RHE 101-02 = RHE 101-02F 1.00
FIN FA206
15
RHE-101-02F
Public Speaking
Drury J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
RHE 101-02 = RHE 101-02F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
FIN FA206
5
RHE-101-03
Public Speaking
C. Geraths
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
RHE 101-03 = RHE 101-03F 1.00
FIN FA206
15
RHE-101-03F
Public Speaking
C. Geraths
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
RHE 101-03 = RHE 101-03F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
FIN FA206
5
RHE-101-04
Public Speaking
Abbott J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
RHE 101-04 = RHE 101-04F 1.00
FIN FA206
15
RHE-101-04F
Public Speaking
Abbott J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
RHE 101-04 = RHE 101-04F FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
FIN FA206
5
RHE-101-05
Public Speaking
Geraths C
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
1.00
FIN FA206
20
RHE-201-01
Reasoning & Advocacy
Drury J
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
BAX 202
25
RHE-270-01
Special Topics Lit/Fine Arts
Geraths C
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
RHE 270-01: Digital Rhetoric + The Digital Humanities: Information, Media, Futures "Digital" possesses an expansive definition. It means, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, everything from "a whole number less than 10" to "any of the fingers . of the hand" to "technologies [of] media . television . and audio." In its many grammatical guises "digital" is, all at once, a noun, an adjective, and a verb. We have digits, we use digital things, and we digitize. This course will work to chart the rhetorical expansiveness embedded within our understandings and use of all things digital. In particular, we will work to unpack recent scholarship on "digital rhetoric." We will also explore the recent advent of the "digital humanities" as a field of academic inquiry. Similarly, this course will dwell with the communicative potentials and pitfalls of "information" and "media" as they relate to and make possible our understandings of the digital. Finally, the course will conclude by projecting toward and prognosticating about the "futures" of digitality and the rhetoric(s) therein: including case studies on social media, space exploration, biotechnology, linguistics, and translation. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Cory Geraths 1.00
HAY 001
25 10 
RHE-350-01
Contemp Rhetorical Thy & Crit
Abbott J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Take FRT-101. 1.00
FIN FA206
25
RHE-370-01
Special Topics: Lit/Fine Arts
Drury J
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
RHE 370-01: Rhetoric and Identity This course addresses the overarching question, "how does rhetoric connect to our identities as individuals and community members?" The course will engage themes related to agency (i.e. the capacity to act), similarity and belonging, and difference with an emphasis on national identity. The content will involve theories of rhetoric and identity as well as case studies that illustrate the intersection between them. Students should expect this to be a seminar course, meaning that our class sessions will be largely student-driven discussion from assigned material. By taking this course, students will further develop crucial skills (e.g. productively participating in discussion, critical reading, thinking, and writing) as well as cultivate a more nuanced understanding of how they are positioned by the rhetoric they encounter every day. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Jeffrey Drury Take FRT-101. 1.00
BAX 212
20
RHE-388-01
Independent Study/Lit Fine Art
Quandt K, Geraths C
TBA
TBA - TBA
1.00
TBA TBA
1 -2 
RHE-497-01
Senior Seminar
Drury S, McDorman T
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
M W F
10:00AM - 10:50AM
1.00
GOO 006
GOO 104
 
SOC - SOCIOLOGY
SOC-277-01
Special Topics
Healey C
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
ASI 277-01 = GEN 277-01 = SOC 277-01: Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary East Asia This course considers a range of themes related to gender and sexuality in China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. While the course will be interdisciplinary by nature, many of the readings and discussions will be rooted in a sociological approach. Potential topics include: marriage, family, femininity, masculinity, fluid gender identities, queer sexualities, sexual practices, family planning, gendered divisions of labor, gender and the state, women's and LGBTQ+ movements, gendered spaces, the commercialization of sex, and media portrayals of gender and sexuality. Prerequisites: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Cara Healey 1.00
DET 111
20 13 
SPA - SPANISH
SPA-101-01
Elementary Spanish I
Hardy J
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
CoReq SPA-101L 1.00
DET 112
18
SPA-101-02
Elementary Spanish I
Hardy J
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
CoReq SPA-101L 1.00
DET 109
18
SPA-101L-01
Elementary Spanish I Lab
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq SPA-101 0.00
DET 128
7
SPA-101L-02
Elementary Spanish I Lab
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq SPA-101 0.00
DET 211
7
SPA-101L-03
Elementary Spanish I Lab
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq SPA-101 0.00
DET 226
7
SPA-101L-04
Elementary Spanish I Lab
Staff
F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq SPA-101 0.00
DET 211
7 -2 
SPA-103-01
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Welch M
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
SPA 103 Placement, CoReq SPA-103L 1.00
DET 111
18 -2 
SPA-103-02
Accelerated Elementary Spanish
Y. Botello
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
SPA 103 Placement, CoReq SPA-103L 1.00
DET 211
18
SPA-103L-01
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq SPA-103 0.00
DET 211
6
SPA-103L-02
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
TU
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CoReq SPA-103 0.00
DET 220
6 -1 
SPA-103L-03
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq SPA-103 0.00
DET 128
6
SPA-103L-04
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq SPA-103 0.00
DET 128
6 -1 
SPA-103L-05
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CoReq SPA-103 0.00
DET 220
6
SPA-103L-06
Accelerated Elem. Span. Lab.
Staff
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq SPA-103 0.00
DET 211
6 -1 
SPA-201-01
Intermediate Spanish
Gomez G
M W F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
PreReq SPA-102, 103 or 201 placement, CoReq SPA-201L 1.00
DET 128
18
SPA-201-02
Intermediate Spanish
Gomez G
M W F
09:00AM - 09:50AM
PreReq SPA-102, 103 or 201 placement, CoReq SPA-201L 1.00
DET 128
18
SPA-201-03
Intermediate Spanish
Monsalve M
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
PreReq SPA-102, 103 or 201 placement, CoReq SPA-201L 1.00
DET 212
18
SPA-201L-01
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
M
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq SPA-201 0.00
DET 212
7
SPA-201L-02
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
TU
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CoReq SPA-201 0.00
DET 128
7
SPA-201L-03
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
TU
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq SPA-201 0.00
DET 226
7 -1 
SPA-201L-04
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
W
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq SPA-201 0.00
DET 209
7
SPA-201L-05
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
CoReq SPA-201 0.00
DET 128
7 -1 
SPA-201L-06
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
CoReq SPA-201 0.00
DET 128
7
SPA-201L-07
Intermediate Spanish Lab.
Staff
F
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq SPA-201 0.00
DET 112
7
SPA-202-01
Span.Lang. & Hispanic Cultures
Hardy J
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PreReq SPA-201 or 202 placement, CoReq SPA-202L 1.00
DET 212
18
SPA-202L-01
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
M
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq SPA-202 0.00
DET 112
6
SPA-202L-02
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
W
08:00AM - 08:50AM
CoReq SPA-202 0.00
DET 111
6
SPA-202L-03
Span. Lang/Hisp.Cultures Lab
Staff
TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
CoReq SPA-202 0.00
DET 128
6
SPA-301-01
Conversation & Composition
M. Monsalve
M W F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
PreReq SPA-202 or SPA-301 placement. 1.00
DET 112
18
SPA-302-01
Intro to Literature
Y. Botello
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
PreReq SPA-301 or 321 or 302 placement 1.00
DET 128
18 14 
SPA-313-01
Studies in Hispanic Literature
Monsalve M
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
SPA-301 and 302 1.00
DET 112
18 10 
SPA-401-01
Spanish Senior Seminar
Gomez G
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
Take SPA-302. 1.00
DET 220
 
THE - THEATER
THE-101-01
Introduction to Theater
H. Vogel
M W F
01:10PM - 02:10PM
THE 101-01 = THE 101-01F 1.00
FIN M120
25
THE-101-01F
Introduction to Theater
H. Vogel
M W F
01:10PM - 02:00PM
THE 101-01 = THE 101-01F 1.00
FIN M120
5
THE-103-01
Seminars in Theater
Dreher B
TU TH
08:00AM - 09:15AM
THE 103-01/01F: Stage Properties Stage Properties is a hands-on exploration of the methods and practices used to make convincing, practical props for theater. In this course, we will look at how tools and materials may be used to design and fashion objects which are nearly identical to the "real thing," and we will learn how to build a Jim Henson-style puppet as well. This course consists of individual projects and in-class critiques, with one written assignment. This course is appropriate for freshmen. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: Bridgette Dreher 1.00
FIN T110
8
THE-104-01
Introduction to Film
Cherry J
M F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
W
02:10PM - 04:00PM
THE 104-01 = THE 104-01F 1.00
FIN M120
FIN M120
31
THE-104-01F
Introduction to Film
Cherry J
M F
02:10PM - 03:00PM
W
02:10PM - 04:00PM
THE 104-01 = THE 104-01F 1.00
FIN M120
FIN M120
7
THE-105-01
Introduction to Acting
H. Vogel
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
THE 105-01 = THE 105-01F = THE 105-01S SOPHOMORE AND JUNIOR ONLY SECTION 1.00
FIN EXP
5
THE-105-01F
Introduction to Acting
H. Vogel
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
THE 105-01 = THE 105-01F = THE 105-01S FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION 1.00
FIN EXP
5
THE-105-01S
Introduction to Acting
H. Vogel
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
THE 105-01 = THE 105-01F = THE 105-01S SENIOR ONLY SECTION 1.00
TBA TBA
5
THE-106-01
Stagecraft
Dreher B
TU TH
09:45AM - 11:00AM
1.00
FIN TGRR
20
THE-206-01
Studies in Acting
H. Vogel
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
THE-105 1.00
FIN EXP
15 13 
THE-207-01
Directing
Abbott M
TU TH
02:40PM - 03:55PM
PreReq THE-105 1.00
FIN TGRR
8
THE-212-01
The Revolutionary Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
THE 212-01/01F = ENG 310-01/01F: The Revolutionary Stage NOTE: This class was formerly called "History and Literature of the Theatre II: The French Renaissance to the Rise of Realism" This class will delve into the history of the theatre and its various dramatic literatures in Europe between the years 1660-1900. The course ranges from the witty banterings of Molière and Behn to the realism of Ibsen and Strindberg to the apocalyptic trance of Alfred Jarry. We will discuss the "new woman," the rise of industrialism and cosmopolitanism, and a society shifting under the influence and pressure of the purveyors of new modes of thought-Hegel, Darwin, Nietzsche, Zola. This is a class about the coming of the "new," revolution and counterrevolution, the calms and the storms. The plays in this course will be discussed as instruments for theatrical production; as examples of dramatic structure, style, and genre; and, most importantly, as they reflect the moral, social, and political issues of their time. This course is appropriate for freshmen. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: James Cherry 1.00
FIN TGRR
12
THE-212-01F
The Revolutionary Stage
Cherry J
TU TH
01:10PM - 02:25PM
FRESHMEN ONLY SECTION THE 212-01/01F = ENG 310-01/01F: The Revolutionary Stage NOTE: This class was formerly called "History and Literature of the Theatre II: The French Renaissance to the Rise of Realism" This class will delve into the history of the theatre and its various dramatic literatures in Europe between the years 1660-1900. The course ranges from the witty banterings of Molière and Behn to the realism of Ibsen and Strindberg to the apocalyptic trance of Alfred Jarry. We will discuss the "new woman," the rise of industrialism and cosmopolitanism, and a society shifting under the influence and pressure of the purveyors of new modes of thought-Hegel, Darwin, Nietzsche, Zola. This is a class about the coming of the "new," revolution and counterrevolution, the calms and the storms. The plays in this course will be discussed as instruments for theatrical production; as examples of dramatic structure, style, and genre; and, most importantly, as they reflect the moral, social, and political issues of their time. This course is appropriate for freshmen. Prerequisite: None Credits: 1 Instructor: James Cherry 1.00
FIN TGRR
3
THE-303-01
Seminar in Theater
Bear A
M W F
11:00AM - 11:50AM
IMMERSION COURSE - PRAGUE THE-303-01: Seminar in Theater: A Study in Czech Puppetry This course focuses on the history of Czech puppetry, and its place in the larger culture of the Czech Republic. The students will explore cultural representations of puppetry in Czech art, literature and theatre. They will also design puppets for an end-of-semester theatrical production based on various Czech folktales. During an immersion trip, students will travel to Prague to learn from and work with professional puppeteers to build their own hand-carved marionettes based on their designs. Students will also gain inspiration from visits to various puppet museums, puppet theatres, and daily explorations of the history and culture of Prague. Permission of the instructor is required for participation in this course. Prerequisite: One course from the following: THE-106, THE-201, THE-202, THE-203, ART 125, ART 126, ART 223, ART 227, and permission of the instructor. Credits: 1 Instructor: Andrea Bear 1.00
FIN TGRR
8
THE-498-01
Special Topics
Abbott M
M F
03:10PM - 04:00PM
1.00
FIN TGRR
10